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ReelPolitik

Why Did it Take Three Years for Nadav Lapid's "Policeman" to Get Released?

  • By Anthony Kaufman
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  • June 13, 2014 11:47 AM
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Israeli filmmaker Nadav Lapid's superb art-film thriller and incisive social critique "Policeman" is finally getting released in the U.S., three years after it won the top prize at the Locarno Film Festival. It's been called one of the strongest debut films on the world cinema stage. And Lapid's follow-up "The Kindergarten Teacher," which just premiered in Cannes, proves that Lapid is no one-hit wonder. He's an auteur-to-watch, with big ideas and aesthetic mastery to match. We can thank small distributor Corinth Releasing for picking up the film, but it will be the critics that will need to drive this micro-release.

Emergency Cinema: Syrian Docs Transcend the "Bang-Bang Shit" of the Mainstream Media

  • By Anthony Kaufman
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  • June 13, 2014 7:35 AM
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"This isn’t just some 'bang bang shit' from Syria," said Human Rights Watch Film Festival Deputy Director Andrea Holley. It was the key defining line of my recent Indiewire article--the kind of declarative in-your-face statement meant to turn people's heads. Indeed, when 54,000 civilians have reportedly died in the conflict in Syria, it's about time people turn their heads.

Thailand Bans Screening of Orwell Film "1984"

  • By Anthony Kaufman
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  • June 12, 2014 9:26 AM
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Thailand's political unrest continues to get wrapped up with cinema. After the three-finger salute from "The Hunger Games" become a symbol of resistance among protestors, now a screening of Michael Radford's 1984 adaptation of the dystopian George Orwell classic has been cancelled in the Northern region of Changmai after police warned "it breached a ban on political gatherings,"

Agnieszka Holland's "Burning Bush" Raises Not-so-historical Spectre of Russian Occupation

  • By Anthony Kaufman
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  • June 11, 2014 10:18 AM
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It wasn't so long ago that Russian tanks were rolling through Eastern Europe and subjugating their neighboring country's peoples. Oh, wait: that was just a couple months ago in Ukraine. But Agnieszka Holland's wonderfully engaging miniseries,"Burning Bush" (opening theatrically at New York's Film Forum today), set in Prague 1969, takes this historical moment to create a sensitive and resonant account of Russian totalitarianism that should feel all too familiar.

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