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BEST FILMS OF 2013

Reviews
by Caryn James
December 20, 2013 12:35 AM
6 Comments
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I am absolutely certain about the top three films on this list. But the further down we go, the more absurd it seems to rank films as different as the Coen Brothers' wonderfully layered look at a struggling folk singer in the 60's and Martin Scorsese's bacchanalia of 80's excess. So feel free to juggle the numbers in your own mind. What I know is that all these films share ambition and artistry, and are among the year's best.

1. HER

By far the year's most audacious and truthful film, and also its most romanctic. Spike Jonze uses the affair between a lonely guy (the incredibely touching Joaquin Phoenix) and his computer's operating system (Scarlett Johansson's voice) to reveal the sometimes uneasy truth about love and romance in the age of the internet. (You can find my longer take on "Her and Seduction" at The Daily Beast.)

2. 12 YEARS A SLAVE

The fact-based story of a free man trapped into slavery is the year's most powerful film, held together by director Steve McQueen's unblinking rigor and grace, and especially by Chiwetel Ejiofor, giving the year's single best performance. His portrayal of Solomon Northrup is so painfully sympathetic you can't look away, even when the film is at its most wrenching.  

3. NEBRASKA

Alexander Payne's droll, affecting story of an old man and the son who takes him on a hopeless quest to pick up his sweepstakes winnings may be the year's most perfectly-wrought film. From its flawless performance by Bruce Dern to its counterintuitive use of cinemascope black-and-white, there is not a misstep.

4. INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS

Joel and Ethan Coen's comic drama about a struggling folk singer in the Greenwich Village of the 60's is totally charming, with a dark underside that never gets in the way of its  hilariously observed scenes and perfect lines. John Goodman saying you commit suicide by jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge, not the George Washington ( "Who does that?") is classic Coen brothers.  

5. THE WOLF OF WALL STREET  

Simply amazing. Martin Scorsese's relentlessly energetic film about a corrupt, drug-fueled Wall Street millionare (Leonardo DiCaprio) grips you for three hours without ever offering a likable major character. It's like being in the vortex of an alien world of drugs and money.    

6. AMERICAN HUSTLE  

David O. Russell's comic romp about a 70's FBI scam is shaped by  joyfully outsize performances from Christian Bale, Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper.

7. THE INVISIBLE WOMAN

Ralph Fiennes is dynamic as director and star in this emotionally penetrating film about Charles' Dickens'  tortured love affair with a young actress, Nelly Ternan (Felicity Jones). I hope this delicately beautiful yet deeply moving film doesn't get swamped by the Christmas competition.

8. THE BROKEN CIRCLE BREAKDOWN

Bluegrass from Belgium, as director Felix Van Groeningen uses music and a fractured chronology to tell the story of romance, marriage and grief. One of those captivating little films that is achingly better than its bare-bones plot.    

9. TOP OF THE LAKE  

If I  hear  one more argument about film vs. television I will scream. The lines have blurred; they're both good. Jane Campion's sharply observed characters have room to breathe in this smart, engrossing Sundance Channel miniseries about a detective (Elisabeth Moss) obsessed with finding a missing girl. .  

10. THE SELFISH GIANT

Honestly, a few films could also have taken this last slot (Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine, Derek Cianfrance's The Place Beyond the Pines) but Clio Barnard is one of today's most audacious filmmakers. She brings visual poetry to a gritty world, in the story of the friendship between two working-class British boys who gather scrap metal for money.

There also seemed to be more smart, accomplished, small-scale indies than ever this year, films that didn't make the Top Ten but deserve wider audiences and a long afterlife. Don't miss  Scott McGehee and David Siegel's update of Henry James' What Maisie Knew, with Julianne Moore and Steve Coogan as bad parents in contemporary New York;  Destin Cretton's  Short Term 12, with its perfectly balance performance by Brie Larson as a youth counselor with her own problems; and  Todd Berger's ultra-dark black comedy about a dirty bomb in the neighborhood,  It's a Disaster. 

Free Indie Movies and Documentaries    

6 Comments

  • Rose Marie Morse | January 4, 2014 8:35 AMReply

    True about Nebraska. A flawless performance by Bruce Dern. I was so taken by the barren landscape both in nature and in culture and yet underneath the desperation, the alcoholism, the emptiness of the days, the rough talk, there was love. Love that ultimately lit everyone.

  • Eric | December 20, 2013 1:33 PMReply

    Great list. Look forward to seeing many of these in the next couple weeks. I also really did enjoy Mud.

    @Dan The Place Beyond The Pines played at the Toronto Film Fest in 2012 but was released in 2013.

  • dan | December 20, 2013 11:57 AMReply

    place beyond the pines came out in 2012

  • MDL | December 22, 2013 6:22 PM

    The Place Beyond the Pines came out in 2013. Everwhere. It DID play Toronto Film Festival in 2012 but so did other 2103 films. Films are determined by theatrical release date not by festival appearance.

  • Guenther Krumminga | December 20, 2013 11:12 AMReply

    Caryn:
    You must be kidding. What About "Blue is...."
    Happy holidays!

  • Kailash Gaur | December 20, 2013 4:33 AMReply

    Nice article.

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