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Amy Schumer's "The Foodroom" Deep-Fries Aaron Sorkin

Photo of Sam Adams By Sam Adams | Criticwire April 15, 2014 at 12:17PM

Amy Schumer's parody of Aaron Sorkin's tics isn't a friendly jab but a scorched-earth polemic.
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Josh Charles and Amy Schumer in "The Foodroom"
Josh Charles and Amy Schumer in "The Foodroom"

Aaron Sorkin's style has become so recognizable it almost parodies itself, but this clip from tonight's episode of "Inside Amy Schumer" does more than serve up screwball dialogue and walk-and-talks. In fact, despite its open-credits invocation of "The Newsroom's" portentous fanfare, "The Foodroom" doesn't go after Sorkin's style so much as his worldview. Watch first, then let's discuss.

"Sports Night" veteran Josh Charles knows Sorkin's house style cold, but he's not aping it the way he did during his post-"Good Wife" EPSN cameo. Nor does Schumer try to squeeze herself into the Jimmy Choos of Sorkin's typical feather-brained heroines: When she coos to Charles' fast-food manager that "A woman’s life is worth nothing unless she’s making a great man greater," you don't get the sense that even she believes it. What's most enjoyable is the way "The Foodroom" skewers the underlying premise of all of Sorkin's shows -- that what these people are doing matters, dammit. (Check the disconnect between the Defcon 1 tension inside the restaurant and the diffident school bus driver without.) This isn't one of those parodies where you feel like, deep down, the people who made it really love the thing they're poking fun at. It's a scorched-earth polemic in sketch-comedy form, one that were Sorkin susceptible to criticism at all would prompt a long, hard look in the mirror.


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