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Apparently Dogs Are Reviewing Movies Now

Photo of Sam Adams By Sam Adams | Criticwire July 11, 2014 at 2:06PM

At last, a perspective that has too long been absent from the world of film criticism.
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Dogs

Good news for those concerned about the lack of diversity in the film-criticism field? No, there aren't significantly more women reviewing movies than there were earlier this week, but the cruel barrier limiting the profession to sentient human beings has finally fallen, thanks to the Wrap's "In the Doghouse."

In the show — we could argue about whether it deserves the term, but let's give them that — two unidentified humans act as interpreters for "Barkston Globe critic Gaston, miniature schnauzer, and New York Pawst critic Bugsy, a pug" as they offer their opinions on a variety of TV shows and current movie releases. Have a look, if you dare:

Bugsy, who picks "Rectify" over his Gaston's "Pretty Little Liars," is clearly the Roger Ebert of this particular team. But as far as canine critics go, both pale in comparison to the articulateness of the three dogs Maxim employed to review "Pacific Rim" last summer. At least they're both more on it than their human handlers, who evidence the level of on-camera polish normally associated with the public-access graveyard shift. (If you like awkward interaction, don't miss the final signoff.) Hell, you could do worse.

Update: Kartemquin's Tim Hosburgh points out that Siskel & Ebert themselves used to call on the services of one Spot the Wonder Dog, who would introduce their "Dog of the Week" segment. Here's a glimpse.


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