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From the Wire: A Next-Gen Film Criticism Symposium

Criticwire By Matt Singer | Criticwire March 8, 2013 at 3:45PM

A sampling of critics under the age of 35 talk about what it means to be a film critic in 2013.
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Cineaste

Some recommended reading for your weekend: Cineaste's new symposium on "Film Criticism: The Next Generation." The magazine surveyed half a dozen film critics under the age of 35 --  Simon Abrams, Adam Cook, Leo Goldsmith, Calum Marsh, Boris Nelepo, and Vadim Rizov -- and posted their responses to five questions about their work, their inspiration, and their influences. If you're a reader of this website, it's a pretty essential look at what these next-gen critics are thinking and feeling (also if you're not a reader of this website, how are you reading this right now?). Here's Goldsmith answering the question "What does being a film critic mean to you?"

"I think of criticism in the same realm as all other writing, as an act of production, of creation -- in reaction to another work, to be sure (and therefore something like a translation or a remake), but nonetheless as something that advances a position of its own, that delineates a space that includes the writer, the filmmaker, and the viewer-reader. (Philippe Grandrieux’s film about Masao Adachi, 'It May Be That Beauty Has Strengthened Our Resolve,' in this sense, is an ideal work of film criticism.) In the best cases, which are admittedly few, this is something more than the mere beginning of a dialogue; it is philosophy and politics."

Film criticism is an art form unto itself, even if, as Goldsmith writes, it draws on another art form for inspiration. There's lots more inspiration in the rest of this Cineaste article, which includes lengthy responses from all six younger critics. If you want even more responses to their survey, you can pick up the magazine's new Spring 2013 issue, which includes contributions from five additional critics under the age of 35.

Read more of "Film Criticism: The Next Generation."

This article is related to: From the Wire


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