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Listen to a Film Criticism Panel Discussion Featuring Scott Foundas, Katey Rich, Josh Rothkopf, and Some Other Guy

Criticwire By Matt Singer | Criticwire March 6, 2013 at 11:24AM

Yesterday, Indiewire's Eric Kohn and I returned to the Digital Hollywood Summit in New York City for our second Criticwire panel discussion on the state of film criticism (you can listen to the first, from last fall, here). This time we were joined by three new esteemed guests: Scott Foundas from The Village Voice, Katey Rich from Cinema Blend, and Joshua Rothkopf from Time Out New York. Over the course of a nearly hourlong conversation, the panel discussed a whole mess of topics pertaining to the world of film criticism in 2013: how critics choose their subjects, how they approach film festivals, how Twitter is changing the way critics talk about movies, and how embargoes are affecting critics' ability to write (and their ability to whine about access). Later, we fielded questions from the audience and talked further about embargoes and the role of Rotten Tomatoes in the modern critical landscape. If you listen that long you'll also hear me take issue with one member of the audience when he bemoans the fact that critics no longer have the power to save movies from obscurity (as I noted, Kenneth Lonergan might disagree with him).
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"Ratatouille"
Disney/Pixar "Ratatouille"

Yesterday, Indiewire's Eric Kohn and I returned to the Digital Hollywood Summit in New York City for our second Criticwire panel discussion on the state of film criticism (you can listen to the first, from last fall, here). This time we were joined by three new esteemed guests: Scott Foundas from The Village Voice, Katey Rich from Cinema Blend, and Joshua Rothkopf from Time Out New York. Over the course of a nearly hourlong conversation, the panel discussed a whole mess of topics pertaining to the world of film criticism in 2013: how critics choose their subjects, how they approach film festivals, how Twitter is changing the way critics talk about movies, and how embargoes are affecting critics' ability to write (and their ability to whine about access). Later, we fielded questions from the audience and talked further about embargoes and the role of Rotten Tomatoes in the modern critical landscape. If you listen that long you'll also hear me take issue with one member of the audience when he bemoans the fact that critics no longer have the power to save movies from obscurity (as I noted, Kenneth Lonergan might disagree with him).

Once again, the staff at the Digital Hollywood Summit were nice enough to record the entire panel and now we're pleased to share it with you for your listening pleasure. Enjoy.


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