New and Reviewed on DVD/Blu-Ray for March 27th

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by Forrest Cardamenis
March 27, 2013 11:45 AM
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"Lincoln."
There's a strong batch of home video releases this week, with acclaimed titles domestic and abroad, award-nominated studio films and independent hits. First is the Steven Spielberg, Tony Kushner, Daniel Day-Lewis collaborative biopic "Lincoln," which won some of 2012's best reviews:

"Lincoln"
Criticwire Average: B+ (108 ratings)

"The movie is at its heart a 'West Wing'-ish political drama, talky and detailed, submerged in legislative maneuvering, shot in patient, unflashy golden tones by a subdued Spielberg." -- Eugene Novikov, Film Blather

More divisive is Andrew Dominik's long-awaited follow-up to "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford," the more reasonably (and briskly) titled "Killing Them Softly:"

"Killing Them Softly"
Criticwire Average: B (94 ratings)

"This symbolism is all a little too neat but it’s also hard to quarrel with Dominik. These wise guys do business with the same carelessness as Wall Street only not so many people get hurt." -- Kirk Honeycutt, Honeycutt's Hollywood

From Denmark, the Oscar-nominated "A Royal Affair" also arrives:

"A Royal Affair"
Criticwire Average: B+ (39 ratings)

"Nicolaj Arcel's Danish history lesson avoids several of the most glaring pitfalls of the genre -- it is both illuminating and eminently entertaining." -- Piers Marchant, Sweet Smell of Success

This divisive Tim Heidecker vehicle from Rick Alverson may not play like a comedy, but it's bound to get you thinking:

"The Comedy"
Criticwire Average: B (38 ratings)

"The film's director and writers are, it seems, very careful in allowing the film to have a deliberately vague sensibility, turning it into a cinematic Rorschach test." -- Josh Spiegel, Sound On Sight

But don't miss "Easy Money," which received lots of acclaim despite never getting a chance in the spotlight:

"Easy Money"
Criticwire Average: B+ (15 ratings)

"Thanks to sharp direction from Daniel Espinosa, the interlacing stories come together in a way that feels more organic than calculated." -- Allison Loring, Film School Rejects

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