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The Movie Talk Show of Our Time

  • By Caitlin Hughes
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  • October 18, 2012 4:21 PM
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  • 0 Comments
On a disarming, and disarmingly entertaining television series about great film artists.

Like the Last Time I Saw Someone in Love in Macao

  • By Forrest Cardamenis
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  • October 17, 2012 4:31 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Comparing two portraits of urban loneliness from the New York Film Festival.

Looking For Reasons to Believe in 'Life of Pi'

  • By Max Nelson
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  • October 17, 2012 1:05 PM
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  • 0 Comments
On the difference between "It's visual stunning, but..." and "It's visually stunning, because..."

Through the Looking Glasses

  • By Max Nelson
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  • October 16, 2012 1:02 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Hiler’s lens, it seems, doesn’t always respect the jurisdiction of its peers.

Cristian Mungiu, Beyond the Films

  • By Alec Kubas-Meyer
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  • October 16, 2012 10:20 AM
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  • 0 Comments
On the evolving aesthetics of a brilliantly talented young director.

Garden States: New Jersey, According to David Chase

  • By Caitlin Hughes
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  • October 15, 2012 2:10 PM
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  • 0 Comments
The attraction to, and repulsion of New Jersey in the films of David Chase and the music of Steven Van Zandt's bandmate, Bruce Springsteen.

Intruding on the History of Iranian Cinema

  • By Peter Labuza
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  • October 12, 2012 6:08 PM
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  • 0 Comments
On the film from the New York Film Festival that made one of our Critics Academy members physically ill -- and why that's not a bad thing.

Small (Cinema)Scope: The Widescreen Imagery of 'Beyond the Hills'

  • By Blair McClendon
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  • October 12, 2012 11:51 AM
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  • 0 Comments
"Work of art" does not suffice as a label for Cristian Mungiu’s new film, "Beyond The Hills." Cameras have long celebrated labor, of bodies as well as minds, and here the film itself has become "work" in all of its most beautiful, terrifying connotations. This tale of two young women -- friends since their days in an orphanage, who reunite in a monastery -- pushes itself to the point of exhaustion. Yet, it never collapses. It only builds upon itself promising something ever more powerful until the screen finally goes black and the audience, too, has labored long and hard.

Window Shopping Through Kiarostami and Dorsky

  • By Max Nelson
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  • October 11, 2012 12:08 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Just one look (or two) in the films of two New York Film Festival auteurs.

Love and Death in the Films of Michael Haneke

  • By Forrest Cardamenis
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  • October 10, 2012 1:06 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Sadistic? Maybe. Hard to watch? Sometimes. Familial? Definitely, though it may take a bit of work to notice.