Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
First Reviews: 'Hail, Caesar!' Is the Coens at Their Best First Reviews: 'Hail, Caesar!' Is the Coens at Their Best A.O. Scott and Why It's a Critic's Duty to Be Wrong A.O. Scott and Why It's a Critic's Duty to Be Wrong Kristen Wiig's 'AbracaDeborah' Is the Non-Existent Sundance Movie Everyone's Talking About Kristen Wiig's 'AbracaDeborah' Is the Non-Existent Sundance Movie Everyone's Talking About Film Writers Narrowly Escape Tragedy in Sundance Accident Film Writers Narrowly Escape Tragedy in Sundance Accident Is There More to Louis C.K.'s 'Horace and Pete' Than Its Surprise Release? Is There More to Louis C.K.'s 'Horace and Pete' Than Its Surprise Release? Natalie Portman's Doomed Western 'Jane Got a Gun' Gets Shot Down by Critics Natalie Portman's Doomed Western 'Jane Got a Gun' Gets Shot Down by Critics New Classics: Greg Mottola's 'Adventureland' New Classics: Greg Mottola's 'Adventureland' 'Manchester by the Sea,' Indiewire's Sundance Critics Poll Winner, Is Part Tragedy, Part Farce 'Manchester by the Sea,' Indiewire's Sundance Critics Poll Winner, Is Part Tragedy, Part Farce Daily Reads: Why the Disney Vault Needs to Go Away, How the Republican Primaries Have Broken 'SNL,' and More Daily Reads: Why the Disney Vault Needs to Go Away, How the Republican Primaries Have Broken 'SNL,' and More The Totally Insane Ending to 'Little Boy' Has Critics Fuming The Totally Insane Ending to 'Little Boy' Has Critics Fuming Daily Reads: The 100 Jokes That Shaped Modern Comedy, When TV Drama Cover The Iowa Caucus, and More Daily Reads: The 100 Jokes That Shaped Modern Comedy, When TV Drama Cover The Iowa Caucus, and More New Classic: Asghar Farhadi's 'A Separation' New Classic: Asghar Farhadi's 'A Separation' Daily Reads: The 'Hollywood Blackout' Controversy at the 1996 Academy Awards, Everybody's a Critic and That's How it Should Be, and More Daily Reads: The 'Hollywood Blackout' Controversy at the 1996 Academy Awards, Everybody's a Critic and That's How it Should Be, and More Adam Sandler's 'The Ridiculous 6' Is Getting Some of the Year's Most Hilariously Scathing Reviews Adam Sandler's 'The Ridiculous 6' Is Getting Some of the Year's Most Hilariously Scathing Reviews One of the Best Movies of 2015 Is Now Available On Demand. (Also It's 16 Minutes Long.) One of the Best Movies of 2015 Is Now Available On Demand. (Also It's 16 Minutes Long.) Is 'Horace and Pete' Worth $5? And Who's Asking, Anyway? Is 'Horace and Pete' Worth $5? And Who's Asking, Anyway? Could 'The Hateful Eight' Kill Film Instead of Saving It? Could 'The Hateful Eight' Kill Film Instead of Saving It? 'The Gift': A Great Thriller (Almost) Ruined By a Terrible Ending 'The Gift': A Great Thriller (Almost) Ruined By a Terrible Ending Fear of a Black Dingus: Quentin Tarantino's 'The Hateful Eight' Fear of a Black Dingus: Quentin Tarantino's 'The Hateful Eight' 'Star Wars: The Force Awakens': Why Rey's Hypercompetence Is a Feature, Not a Bug 'Star Wars: The Force Awakens': Why Rey's Hypercompetence Is a Feature, Not a Bug

'The Wes Anderson Collection's Matt Zoller Seitz on the "Perfect" 'Rushmore'

Photo of Sam Adams By Sam Adams | Criticwire October 16, 2013 at 11:29AM

The author of 'The Wes Anderson Collection' pays tribute to the director's first masterpiece with a video essay.
1
Rushmore

Like the movies it lovingly details, The Wes Anderson Collection is a beautiful object, a weighty, oversize 300+-pager that's a physical pleasure to page through. But it's also a phenomenal work of criticism. Matt Zoller Seitz's essays incisively tease out the themes in Anderson's individual films, and his lengthy interviews with Anderson -- whom Seitz first covered as a novice filmmaker in the Dallas Observer 20 years ago -- are both familiar and exacting. 

The book's been getting rave reviews and selling briskly, and now Seitz is unveiling a series of video essays via his blog at RogerEbert.com. Today, the series hits Rushmore, the movie that first unveiled Anderson's mature style, and it's a treat to feast on those images once more while listening to Seitz discuss what he calls one of few "perfect films." The text is taken largely from Seitz's essay in The Wes Anderson Collection, but he delivers it in amiably offhand fashion, at one point barely suppressing a laugh. Perhaps his most surprising insight is seeing Jason Schwartzman's Max Fischer as a parody of the hyper-confident, rule-breaking heroes incarnated in the 1980s by Robin Williams and Eddie Murphy, as well as Bill Murray, who here plays an older, sadder version of that character. (According to Anderson's interview, Murray played the part for a total of $9,000, and turned down the offer for a piece of the gross.) More video essays will follow, but for now enjoy the first two in the series, and check out Seitz' previous five-part video essay series on Anderson, "The Substance of Style."


This article is related to: From the Wire, Wes Anderson, Matt Zoller Seitz, Jason Schwartzman, Bill Murray


E-Mail Updates