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The GIF Budapest Hotel: Wes Anderson's Stylistic Building Blocks

Photo of Sam Adams By Sam Adams | Criticwire March 5, 2014 at 9:25AM

Breaking down Wes Anderson's favorite devices, one GIF at a time.
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Jason Schwartzman and Jude Law in "The Grand Budapest Hotel"
Jason Schwartzman and Jude Law in "The Grand Budapest Hotel"

With "The Grand Budapest Hotel" beginning its theatrical rollout on Friday, Wes Anderson's oeuvre is once more under the adorable toy microscope -- and given the importance of interior design in Anderson's films, perhaps it's fitting that one of the tributes appears on a site whose primary function appears to be selling roller blinds.

Tudor Davies breaks Anderson's films down according to six stylistic themes, illustrating each with a series of GIFs. Here's the series on point-of-view shots:

POV1
POV3
POV4
POV5
POV6

To be precise, these aren't really themes so much as "building blocks," as they're later described: Anderson's fondness for bright, contrasting colors and sans-serif fonts is obvious, but that observation doesn't tell you much about him beyond his stylistic predilections. But putting these images side by side reveals just how consistent, even obsessive, Anderson is about carrying through visual motifs from one film to the next, and that in turn puts us on the road to understanding how he approaches the process of filmmaking, and perhaps why he favors the obsessive and isolated protagonists he does.

This article is related to: The Grand Budapest Hotel, Wes Anderson


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