Emotional Hardcore

By slacek | Enzian Theater September 8, 2006 at 12:17PM

Emotional Hardcore
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This morning there was no water pressure in our apartment. So maybe being on the 11th floor in an old building isn't so great. Nighttime showers it is! We went to the ThinkFilm breakfast this morning and there among the cast of SHORTBUS celebrated the company's fifth anniversary. Matthew and I saw SHORTBUS a few weeks ago and I have to admit it was odd at first standing there watching the cast eat danish and coffee having seen them bend in positions I didn't even know was possible. But then it hit me that that was part of the point of the film. We all do it. IT and other stuff, eat, drink, shit. We just are. If we kill and mame on film constantly, why can't we fuck too? A little philosophical for 9:30 in the morning but there it is.

Afterward we planned out our day and parted ways. I to Adrian Grenier's SHOT IN THE DARK, the French drama CAGES, and VENUS starring a now ancient Peter O'Toole. Matthew to three others. I don't know a lot about Grenier. I am one of the fraction of people who have barely seen Entourage. But his film is a touching and honest look at a 23 year-old searching for his father. Not overly emotional, but obviously heart-felt. A publicity stunt? Maybe, but I kind of find that hard to believe considering the grounded people around him.

CAGES was powerful and interesting. A fresh look at deep love and loss. French films never cease to amaze me in their honesty. They are so much more emotionally real to me for some reason. Maybe because just when I thought the film was about to turn into a campy revamped Misery, it didn't and held my attention until the end.

VENUS proves that talent is talent at any age. Peter O'Toole is brilliant and sharp as always as an aging actor with the opporutnity for one last Lolita encounter. The young woman playing opposite him, Jodie Whittaker, completely held her own in the presence of greatness. Despite eons of culture between them, the two characters connect because of their vulnerabilities. Vanessa Redgrave turns in stellar performance as usual, nearly out shining someone a fraction of her age and highlighting what it means to age gracefully.
-- Shannon

This article is related to: TIFF