Eric Kohn

Brief Thoughts on “Batman: Year One.”

  • By Eric Kohn
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  • October 31, 2011 10:56 AM
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Brief Thoughts on "Batman: Year One."

  • By Eric Kohn
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  • October 21, 2011 6:03 AM
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While the web has been drenched with rumors and buzz about the upcoming third entry in Christopher Nolan's live action "Batman" movies, the dark knight made a comparatively quieter arrival in a new movie this week: On Tuesday, Warner Home Video released the direct-to-DVD "Batman: Year One," an hourlong adaptation of Frank Miller's seminal '80s comic. Directed by Lauren Montgomery and Sam Liu, the animated feature captures the original elegance of the source material, while at the same time proving that a transcendent experience in one medium doesn't always seamlessly translate into another one.

What's Guillermo Del Toro's Transmedia Studio Working On?

  • By Eric Kohn
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  • August 22, 2011 1:40 AM
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In today's interview with Guillermo Del Toro (the first of two parts), I spoke to the director at great length about his interest in transmedia, which includes the transmedia studio called Mirada that he launched last year. Here's what Del Toro had to say about Mirada's productivity:

Meet Conan O'Brien's Brilliant Editor, Dan Dome.

  • By Eric Kohn
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  • July 28, 2011 1:17 AM
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  • 4 Comments
The best thing about this very funny spoof trailer for a nonexistent exploitation movie called "Butterworth," which aired on "Conan" this week, passes by in a matter of seconds:
More: New Media

David Wain Discusses "Darkon," Screening This Week in New York!

  • By Eric Kohn
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  • July 26, 2011 11:59 AM
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indieWIRE's 15th anniversary series at the 92YTribeca comes to a close this week with a screening co-hosted by our parent company SnagFilms. As the curator of this little program, I invited Snag to choose a film from its library that they felt was particularly strong, and couldn't be happier with the one they have selected. I saw "Darkon" a few years back after it premiered at the SXSW Film Festival. I was immediately struck by the way it treated its subjects, live action role players who dress up in medieval outfits, with utter seriousness. Of course, the movie has certain comedic elements for anyone whose sense of normalcy exists outside of its subjects' point-of-view. But "Darkon" mainly succeeds at dismantling any preconceived judgement of those subjects and widens its focus to become a fascinating portrait of outsiders finding a way to belong, and holding onto it at all costs.

Rex Reed Handicaps "The Myth of the American Sleepover" on Metacritic.

  • By Eric Kohn
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  • July 20, 2011 8:39 AM
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  • 3 Comments
As if you needed another reminder that review aggregators are better for finding reviews rather than measuring them, check out this list of reviews for "The Myth of the American Sleepover," opening this Friday. I may have been more enthusiastic about the movie than Reed, but Metacritic processes his review as the only 0% rating, which knocks the movie's overall rating down a full ten percent. These days, for better or worse, that means something. If you're seeing movies based on numbers alone...stop.

William Mapother is Creepy, But Not in "Another Earth."

  • By Eric Kohn
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  • July 18, 2011 5:15 AM
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When I saw "Another Earth" at Sundance earlier this year, I was caught off guard by the presence of William Mapother. A cousin of Tom Cruise, Mapother recently played the eerie "Other" Ethan on ABC's "Lost," showing up in the first season as a mysterious presence among the plane crash survivors and slowly taking on a more complex dimension over the course of the show (even long after his character was killed off). Although I wrote in my review that Mapother did powerful work in "Another Earth," which opens this week, it's mostly the material that deepens his performance. I don't really feel for the guy as a frustrated widower; he seems like a better fit for the Paul Giamatti school of uncomfortable anti-heroes, as the embedded clip below hopefully demonstrates.

"Our Time," A Documentary About Today's American Youth.

  • By Eric Kohn
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  • July 17, 2011 9:16 AM
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I've been really curious about "Our Time," a documentary directed by Matt Heineman and Matt Wiggins about four recent college grads traveling the country in a quest to understand it. I have yet to watch the movie, which premiered on the Documentary Channel last night, but there will be other opportunities: It's currently available on Amazon and making its way to other VOD platforms soon. In the meantime, I've asked my friend and current Columbia University doctorate candidate Ryan Hagen, who contributed some writing to "Our Time," for his brief thoughts on the project.

This Saturday, Check Out the Last Panel on Distribution You Ever Need to Attend.

  • By Eric Kohn
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  • July 15, 2011 12:00 PM
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I've had a great time putting together a series of events this month to celebrate indieWIRE's 15th anniversary. Although I've only been involved with the site a fraction of that time, I'm always amazed when I hear from longtime readers of the site. indieWIRE has been around to cover some of the biggest accomplishments in (largely American) cinema in recent years. That's what the indieWIRE at 15 series at 92YTribeca and the premiere of the Sundance hit "Bellflower" on Friday are meant to recognize. But there's another aspect of this world--the business side--that indieWIRE has also followed closely. We'll tap into that side of the story on Saturday.

A Yiddish-Speaker Sees "Romeo and Juliet in Yiddish."

  • By Eric Kohn
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  • July 13, 2011 9:15 AM
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You don't have to find the Yiddish language inherently amusing to get something out of "Romeo and Juliet in Yiddish" -- which is currently playing at the Film Society of Lincoln Center's Elinor Bunin Monroe Film Center -- but it helps. A linguistic oddity with oodles of charm, it cleverly satirizes the paradoxical sense of pride and self-loathing that has come to define the modern America Jew. Eve Annenberg's scrappy feature has plenty of appeal if you're willing to go with it.

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