Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

Eric Kohn

In Praise of Roman Polanski's "What?"

  • By Eric Kohn
  • |
  • July 11, 2011 2:52 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Roman Polanski's "What?" is a pleasurably offbeat sex romp that deserves greater recognition among fans of his work. Made in 1972 (but released in the U.S., just barely, with an X rating in 1973; see a review here), the movie preceded "Chinatown," Polanski's universally acclaimed masterpiece, and a far more palatable expression of the director's talents than this twisted satire of free love and American innocence.

"Curb Your Enthusiasm" Returns for Eighth Season, and Larry Gets Lucky.

  • By Eric Kohn
  • |
  • July 7, 2011 7:58 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Larry David is back in fine form with the latest season of "Curb Your Enthusiasm," its eighth (!), which premieres on HBO July 10. Of course, if you're a "Curb" viewer, this should come as no surprise. David's "Seinfeld 2.0" appeal comes the root of his personality. His improvisational approach to each episode's comedy-of-errors progression gives the impression of the world's most awkward documentary scrunched into the comic mayhem of a Looney Tunes cartoon. (David himself resembles Elmer Fudd, with Jeff Garlin as his Daffy.)

5 John Carpenter Alternatives to "The Ward."

  • By Eric Kohn
  • |
  • July 6, 2011 6:27 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
In a review posted today on the main site, I wasn't exactly kind to John Carpenter's "The Ward," although if it was just some forgettable effort from a first-timer I may have simply ignored it. Instead, it's a forgettable effort from a guy who has made masterpieces and for all intents and purposes should still be able to make them. "The Ward" proves that by containing many of the components of great Carpenter works while failing to bring them to life. Here are a few other options that will remain classics long after "The Ward" fades from memory. ("Halloween" being "Halloween," I have left it off this list. It's not really fair to compare any movie to an acknowledged classic of its genre, is it?) With the exception of "Dark Star," all of these titles are available on Netflix Instant.

Robert Sklar, RIP.

  • By Eric Kohn
  • |
  • July 5, 2011 12:00 PM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
I was lucky enough to take one course taught by Robert Sklar, the esteemed film historian and scholar who passed away over the weekend in an unexpected accident, but wish I could have taken many more. Sklar's most influential work, "Movie-Made America," first came out over thirty years ago but remains one of the most important texts for the study of American cinema. (After all, he helped invent the field.) Its thesis, that American film culture owed much to the lower class and the struggles against capitalist interests rather than efforts to sustain them, echoed the egalitarian nature of Sklar's writing: Although primarily an academic, he had the capacity to speak to movie lovers of all stripes. In doing so, he was essentially an activist, capable of making the inarguable case for taking movies seriously--not only as an art form, but a socio-economic force that helps us understand the world.

The Tragedy of Michael Bay.

  • By Eric Kohn
  • |
  • July 4, 2011 12:00 PM
  • |
  • 13 Comments
The best part of "Transformers: Dark of the Moon" has no transformers in it. In the first act of Michael Bay's two-hour-plus threequel, regular transformer pal Shia LaBeouf fights a harder battle than any Decepticon has ever forced on him: Finding a job. In a humorous montage of ill-fated interviews, LaBeouf reminds us that he posseses legitimate acting talent beyond those countless reactions shots to CGI. (Remember "A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints"?) In a vain display of self-confidence, the erstwhile hero repeatedly gets put in his place by striking out. Even a bemused John Malkovich doesn't bat an eyelash when LaBeouf proclaims that he saved the world twice already. When he tells another potential employer that he received a medal from President Obama, the hustler hits another wall: "We're mostly Republican here," comes the reply.

About Eric Kohn

  • July 1, 2011 12:15 PM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
Screen Rush is the personal blog of Eric Kohn, the lead film critic for indieWIRE. His writing has also appeared The New York Times, New York magazine, New York Press, The Wrap, Moving Pictures magazine, Filmmaker, Moviemaker, Heeb Magazine and several other outlets. Born in Texas and raised in Seattle, he holds bachelors and masters degrees in cinema studies from NYU. He currently resides in Brooklyn with his girlfriend, two cats and a projector. E-mail Eric here: eric(at)indiewire(dot)com.

The Starman Who Fell to Earth.

  • By Eric Kohn
  • |
  • July 1, 2011 8:39 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Random question: Has anyone ever pointed out the relationship between these two films?

Bill Pohlad on Terrence Malick: "Why isn't he here? It's not an easy question to answer."

  • By Eric Kohn
  • |
  • May 23, 2011 7:32 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

Why Lars Von Trier Doesn't Offend Us Jews.

  • By Eric Kohn
  • |
  • May 18, 2011 10:57 AM
  • |
  • 10 Comments
Why Lars Von Trier Doesn't Offend Us Jews.

Cannes Clip: A Somber Kanye Plays a Great Set, Including a Stevie Wonder Cover.

  • By Eric Kohn
  • |
  • May 15, 2011 11:54 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Eugene Hernandez provides a nice summary of last night's Kanye West show and the context behind it. Here are few clips I took from my vantage point at the front:

Follow Us

Most Comments

Most "Liked"