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Leonard Maltin

Everything Old Is New Again—In 3D

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • August 12, 2010 4:00 AM
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  • 6 Comments
If you’re in New York City any time over the next two weeks and you’ve never seen “old-school” Hollywood 3D, make a beeline for Film Forum on Houston Street. Forget the untruths and distortions you’ve read about how primitive the process was in the 1950s and judge for yourself. You’ll have a great time, even if most of the movies aren’t great…and you won’t be wearing red-green glasses: that’s just one of the myths that’s been perpetuated by an ignorant press while touting new digital 3D.

Silent Stars Still Mesmerize

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • August 10, 2010 4:00 AM
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  • 4 Comments
At the recent San Francisco Silent Film Festival I acquired several recently-published books I hadn’t seen before. Now that I’ve spent time with them I feel duty-bound to spread the word.

film review: 3D Worth Paying to See: Step Up 3D

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • August 6, 2010 4:00 AM
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  • 1 Comment
As a longtime 3D fan, I’ve been puzzled and discouraged to hear more than one director refer to “subtle use of 3D” in their films. Excuse me? I may be wrong, but I don’t think “subtle” and “3D” belong in the same sentence. The whole point of 3D is to provide an enhanced movie-watching experience. At its best, it can be a lot of fun—whether it’s Charles Bronson leaping out of the dark to pounce on Phyllis Kirk in House of Wax or a winged creature taking flight in How to Train Your Dragon.

A New Show: Maltin On Movies

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • August 5, 2010 9:03 AM
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  • 6 Comments

book review: Three Chords For Beauty's Sake:

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • August 4, 2010 4:00 AM
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  • 4 Comments
The Life of Artie Shaw by Tom Nolan (Norton)

Turner Classic Movies Plays Its Cards Right

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • August 3, 2010 9:03 AM
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  • 0 Comments
I don’t know how the folks at TCM keep topping themselves, but they do. For their annual Summer Under the Stars festival, featuring a different star for every day in August, they’ve hired graphic artist Michael Schwab to create a series of distinctive collector cards, depicting each star in an iconic role one can recognize even in silhouette. You can admire the whole series online HERE. These are not “virtual” creations, however: the network plans to give away 500 complete sets through a sweepstakes drawing you can read about at their site.
More: Journal

secret's out: In Conversation with Kevin Kline

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • August 2, 2010 7:44 AM
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  • 0 Comments
The Extra Man | Kevin Kline | Leonard Maltin | Leonard Maltin's Secret's Out | Movie TrailersI’d never had a chance to talk to Kevin Kline before; what a treat!

film review: Dinner For Schmucks

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • July 31, 2010 6:26 AM
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  • 3 Comments
I’d like to extoll the virtues of a great comedy, but this isn’t it. A word of explanation: I come to Dinner for Schmucks at a disadvantage, because I love the French film on which it’s based, The Dinner Game (1998). I’ve also heard its creator, the brilliant writer-director Francis Veber, describe his filmmaking philosophy, and criticize Hollywood colleagues for always wanting to expand and complicate his material. (The Birdcage is the best translation ever made of a Veber property, but I still prefer his original, La Cage aux Folles.)

film review: Get Low

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • July 30, 2010 4:01 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Get Low is one of the treats of the summer movie season, a modest film that offers ample rewards, not the least being the opportunity to watch wonderful actors at work. The setting is Tennessee during the Great Depression. Robert Duvall is well cast as a man who’s lived as a hermit for the past forty years. One day he turns up in town and asks the local preacher to hold his funeral—while he’s still alive. Over the course of the film we learn what has brought him to this moment, and what drove him away from his friends and neighbors so many years ago.

film review: The Extra Man

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • July 30, 2010 4:00 AM
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  • 3 Comments
If you have any fondness for life’s oddballs, I think you’ll share my affection for the latest film from the writing/directing team of Robert Pulcini and Shari Springer Berman, who brought us American Splendor. The Extra Man, based on a novel by Jonathan Ames, focuses on two men who exist out of their time: Henry Harrison, a pompous, world-class eccentric who gets by as an escort, or “extra man,” for aging Manhattan society women, and Louis Ives, an unworldly academic with a propensity for cross-dressing.

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