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Leonard Maltin

film review: The Kids Are All Right

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • July 9, 2010 4:00 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Annette Bening and Julianne Moore are worth the price of admission to The Kids Are All Right all by themselves, as far as I’m concerned. That the film is so smart and entertaining is icing on the cake.

Looney Tunes, On-Screen And In Print

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • July 7, 2010 4:00 AM
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  • 6 Comments
Sometimes I think I was born at exactly the right time, as a child of the first television generation. When local TV stations purchased libraries of old cartoons and made them part of their daily programming, I had the opportunity to digest and memorize seemingly every Warner Bros. cartoon from the 1930s and 40s. And that’s exactly what I did. I wish I’d had a book like the newly-published The 100 Greatest Looney Tunes Cartoons to guide my path back then.

Cartoons Forever!

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • July 5, 2010 4:00 AM
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  • 5 Comments
As Toy Story 3 racks up some of the best reviews of the year, I’m pleased that so many critics have taken time to make note of the innovative short-subject that accompanies it. Day & Night—which is so clever it’s almost impossible to describe—is the work of an up-and-coming talent named Teddy Newton whom the folks at Pixar have earmarked for big things.

Movie Palaces Come Alive Again

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • July 2, 2010 4:00 AM
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  • 2 Comments
There is no thrill to compare with seeing a classic movie in a great movie theater. For twenty-four years, the Los Angeles Conservancy has hosted a month-long series called Last Remaining Seats, showing vintage films in the city’s great movie palaces, most of which are located on Broadway downtown. This year’s wide-ranging bill of fare included Strangers on a Train, American Graffiti, The Graduate, the 1943 Mexican classic Flor Silvestre, and the silent version of Peter Pan. (The evening I’m really sorry I missed featured How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying with its stars Robert Morse and Michele Lee in person, interviewed by Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner, who features Morse on his show.) I don’t know of another major city with more surviving theaters from the glory days than ours. Alas, this part of Broadway—which used to be a Mecca for Southland shopping and entertainment—is now just a business district during the day and something of a ghost town at night. Post-World War Two suburban sprawl and the destruction of Los Angeles’ much-loved Red Car light-rail system saw to that.
More: Journal

Book review: Shoot The Rehearsal!

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • July 1, 2010 3:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
By Rudy Behlmer (Scarecrow Press)

film review: Eclipse

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • June 30, 2010 1:00 AM
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  • 1 Comment
I haven’t read Stephenie Meyer’s books, but I liked the first Twilight movie, so even though I’m not a card-carrying Twi-hard I have no axe to grind where this series is concerned. That said, I thought this new installment was incredibly boring. Woe to any newcomer who’s unfamiliar with the characters and situations, because Eclipse offers virtually no exposition. I suppose the filmmakers feel that only the faithful will bother to see it, but that’s no excuse for the complete lack of dramatic context.

secret's out: Pulling John

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • June 29, 2010 4:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Pulling John | Leonard Maltin | Leonard Maltin's Secret's Out | Movie Trailers

secret's out: Mary and Max

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • June 28, 2010 8:10 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Mary and Max | Leonard Maltin | Leonard Maltin's Secret's Out | Movie Trailers

secret's out: Art & Copy

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • June 22, 2010 1:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Art & Copy | Leonard Maltin | Leonard Maltin's Secret's Out | Movie TrailersAn excellent--and unsung--documentary now available on DVD.

Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M.: Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast At Tiffany's, And The Dawn Of The Modern Woman

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • June 21, 2010 11:50 AM
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  • 1 Comment
by Sam Wasson (HarperStudio) This splendid new book is more than a mere “making-of” chronicle. It examines Breakfast at Tiffany’s in a variety of contexts, including the careers of its principals (Truman Capote, Audrey Hepburn, Blake Edwards, Henry Mancini, Edith Head, et al), the state of American mores in the early 1960s, society’s view of single women at that time, and the exigencies of the still-potent Production Code in Hollywood.

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