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leonardmaltin
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Leonard Maltin

dvd review: Stagecoach

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • May 24, 2010 6:56 AM
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  • 4 Comments
(Criterion Collection)

secret's out: taking a closer look at North Face

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • May 24, 2010 1:09 AM
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  • 0 Comments
North Face | Leonard Maltin | Leonard Maltin's Secret's Out | Movie Trailers

film review: Solitary Man

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • May 21, 2010 4:00 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Michael Douglas has nothing to fear, so he’s perfectly willing to play a role other actors might run away from: a 60-ish New Yorker who’s a complete and utter louse. Once he married his college sweetheart and owned a string of car dealerships; now all he’s got left is his gift of gab, which can still win over almost any woman, young or old. But without a moral compass, he makes one bad decision after another, causing his personal and professional life to crumble…and he has no one to blame but himself.

film review: Holy Rollers

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • May 21, 2010 4:00 AM
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  • 2 Comments
A good movie starts with an idea. In the case of Holy Rollers, a news item about a drug bust involving Hasidic Jews from Brooklyn, New York inspired a novice producer to believe that this could be the springboard for a film…and he was right. Holy Rollers is a piece of fiction inspired by that factual incident. It’s modest in its ambitions but realizes them fully, in a deceptively simple, stragithforward film that’s both satisfying and thought-provoking.

The Original King of Comedy

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • May 19, 2010 3:59 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Book Review: MACK SENNETT’S FUN FACTORY by Brent E. Walker (McFarland)

The Italian Straw Hat

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • May 18, 2010 6:11 AM
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  • 0 Comments
How can a film that’s more than eighty years old seem fresh and modern? That’s the marvel of Rene Clair’s silent gem The Italian Straw Hat (1927), which has been lovingly restored by producer David Shepard for DVD release through Jeffery Masino’s Flicker Alley. If you’ve never seen the picture, you owe it to yourself to experience its wit and charm, which is comparable to the finest work of Ernst Lubitsch…yet it is distinctly, unmistakably French. While its source material (an emblematic stage farce written in 1851) was already well-worn by the late 1920s, Clair put his own stamp on it by changing—

secret's out: A Closer Look at Please Give

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • May 17, 2010 6:48 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Please Give | Leonard Maltin's Secret's Out | Movie Trailers

film review: Robin Hood

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • May 13, 2010 4:30 AM
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  • 28 Comments
I went into this film with a “show me” attitude, but I freely admit it won me over. In spite of a few quibbles, I came away entertained. Perhaps the best compliment I can pay to director Ridley Scott, screenwriter Brian Helgeland, and their cast is that I didn’t find myself comparing their work to Robin Hoods past. They have managed to put their stamp on a familiar tale without completely subverting it.

Remembering Other Robin Hoods

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • May 13, 2010 4:16 AM
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  • 9 Comments
If you ask my daughter, there’s only one Robin Hood that matters: the Disney animated feature from 1973 with Phil Harris (channeling Baloo the Bear from The Jungle Book) in the role of Little John. If you ask me or most of my film-buff pals we’ll reflexively point to Errol Flynn in the ageless Technicolor swashbuckler The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), as perfect a movie as one could ever ask for, with superb production values and a cast that can’t be beat. Yet I wonder if some moviegoers in 1938 approached that film grumbling that no one could replace Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. After all, Fairbanks was the movies’ first great swashbuckler, and he put his indelible brand on such characters as Zorro, D’Artagnan, and Robin Hood. (Indeed, in his New York Times review on May 13, 1938, Frank S. Nugent was obliged to observe, “Mr. Flynn is not the acrobatic Robin Douglas Fairbanks was some years ago. He doesn’t slide down tapestries or vault the balustrades with—
More: Journal

On The Set With Lena Horne

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • May 10, 2010 6:51 AM
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  • 5 Comments
There are some days you just can’t forget. On March 13, 1993, I was given the opportunity to watch Lena Horne film her introductions for That’s Entertainment! III and interview her for Entertainment Tonight. The setting was the recording stage where Horne and all the MGM stars and musicians worked during the “golden age.” (Never mind that it was now the Sony Pictures lot; the stage itself hadn’t changed a bit.) The fabled hairdresser to the stars, Sydney Guilaroff, had come out of retirement to take care of Ms. Horne that day, and Roddy McDowall was there with his camera to take pictures of the historic happenings.
More: Journal

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