leonardmaltin
Contact Leonard at MovieCrazyMail@maltinmovies.com


Click inside the box for details




Leonard Maltin

film review: Conviction

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • October 15, 2010 4:00 AM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
I know, I know: this sounds like TV-movie fodder. But Conviction isn’t a formulaic feel-good saga. It is based on a true story that takes many unexpected turns, and I found it quite moving. Hilary Swank plays a working-class Massachusetts woman in the 1980s who vows to go back to school and earn a law degree so she can help her innocent brother beat a murder rap that’s put him in prison for life. Sam Rockwell is the brother, a lifelong hellraiser who can’t believe his sister has that kind of devotion—

Another Studio Vault Opens!

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • October 13, 2010 4:00 AM
  • |
  • 10 Comments
Following Warner Bros.’ great success with warnerarchive.com, and Universal’s licensing of vintage titles to Movies Unlimited and Turner Classic Movies, Sony has stepped up to the plate to launch its own vintage movie line on DVD, drawing on its vast library of Columbia Pictures. The more the merrier, says I.
More: Journal

A Towering Figure—And A Towering Book

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • October 11, 2010 4:00 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
BOOK REVIEW — EMPIRE OF DREAMS: THE EPIC LIFE OF CECIL B. DeMILLE by Scott Eyman (Simon & Schuster)

film review: Secretariat

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • October 8, 2010 4:01 AM
  • |
  • 5 Comments
The secret of this film’s success is that it isn’t just the saga of a famous, prize-winning horse; it’s also the story of his owner, a suburban housewife and mom who stepped into a man’s world and took charge of an animal she believed to be a champion. It documents a time in the late 1960s and early 70s, when social change was in the air, and women’s roles in society were changing, if slowly. Mike Rich’s screenplay captures the time quite well, as do all the visual details onscreen. Those qualities—plus an exceptionally good cast—lift this above the norm for sports movies and underdog tales.

film review: Nowhere Boy

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • October 8, 2010 4:00 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
I saw this film in the best possible way: I didn’t know what it was about before I attended an early screening. I found it to be a moving look at a teenage boy’s struggles with his splintered family in England during the 1960s. When I realized the protagonist was John Lennon, it made even more sense, as I remembered, in sketchy form, the story of his adolescence.

film review: It's Kind Of A Funny Story

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • October 8, 2010 3:59 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

Just For Laughs

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • October 6, 2010 4:00 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Imagine my surprise when, last week, I was contacted by a producer from The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. She told me that they were preparing an annual fundraising event called The Night of Too Many Stars, to raise money for Autism education. Launched several years ago by comedian Robert Smigel, better known to most people as the voice of Triumph the Insult Comic Dog, and whose son has autism, the charity event has raised millions of dollars thanks to its airing on Comedy Central and the participation of Jon Stewart as host… not to mention a truly impressive array of stars. The producer explained to me that Smigel and Sarah Silverman had created a—
More: Journal

Prodding My Memory...

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • October 5, 2010 8:59 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Gloria Stuart was no empty-headed ingénue: here she plays chess with George Sanders on the set of The Lady Escapes (1937).
More: Journal

Movie Crazy All Over Again

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • October 2, 2010 5:00 AM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
Dooley Wilson as Sam, the movies’ most famous piano player (who couldn’t really play) in Casablanca.
More: Journal

film review: The Social Network

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • October 1, 2010 4:31 AM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
The most talked-about film of the season turns out to be worthy of all that chatter, whether it be online or in person. The Social Network is a completely absorbing, high-octane drama about the invention of Facebook, as told from several points of view—and it’s that Rashomon-like approach that makes it especially intriguing.

Email Updates