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Leonard Maltin

film review: Boxing Gym

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • November 5, 2010 4:10 AM
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  • 0 Comments
The grand old man of cinema vérité-style documentaries, Frederick Wiseman, shows no signs of slowing down, nor has he lost his keen ability to capture the sights, sounds, and overall milieu of his chosen subject. Last year he took us behind the scenes of the Paris Opera’s ballet troupe in La Danse; this year he presents a compelling portrait of life at Lord’s Gym in Austin, Texas.

film review: 127 Hours

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • November 5, 2010 4:05 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Directors like to test themselves, especially when they’re riding a wave of success. Having enjoyed worldwide acclaim for the emotional and immersive Slumdog Millionaire, Danny Boyle has chosen an entirely different kind of story for his next project that presents a unique series of filmmaking challenges. I’d say he has met them all in 127 Hours, collaborating with key members of his Oscar-winning Slumdog team, including screenwriter Simon Beaufoy, composer A.R. Rahman, and cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle (who shared his task with Enrique Chediak).

film review: Due Date

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • November 5, 2010 4:01 AM
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  • 0 Comments

James MacArthur: The Disney Connection

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • November 2, 2010 11:23 AM
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  • 2 Comments
When James MacArthur passed away last week at the age of 72, the obituaries I read emphasized his role as “Danno” on the long-running TV hit Hawaii Five-O, and understandably so…but at the same time they glossed over his career-building years at the Walt Disney studio. I was too young to see teenaged MacArthur in the live TV drama The Young Stranger and the feature film it spawned was over my head as a young moviegoer, but I vividly remember being introduced to the actor when Disney released The Light in the Forest, Third Man on the Mountain, Kidnaped, and Swiss Family Robinson. I wrote about all those films, and their significance, in my book The Disney Films, and still think Third Man on the Mountain is an—
More: Journal

book review: Kay Thompson: From Funny Face To Eloise

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • November 2, 2010 3:02 AM
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  • 1 Comment
By Sam Irvin (Simon and Schuster)

maltin on movies: The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • October 30, 2010 7:10 AM
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  • 0 Comments
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest | Leonard Maltin | Maltin on Movies | Movie Trailer

maltin on movies: Welcome To The Rileys

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • October 29, 2010 7:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Welcome to the Rileys | Leonard Maltin | Maltin on Movies | Movie Trailer

Horror's Forgotten Man

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • October 29, 2010 5:00 AM
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  • 1 Comment
TOD SLAUGHTER… AND OTHER HALLOWEEN DISCOVERIES
More: Journal

film review: Nora's Will

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • October 28, 2010 7:51 AM
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  • 0 Comments
Indie and foreign films have a tougher time than ever in today’s marketplace, which is why I want to call your attention to an import that’s truly worth seeing—even though you may not have heard much about it. Nora’s Will has won a number of film festival awards, which got my attention. I also put considerable stock in Menemsha Films, the small, dedicated distributor that has taken on its U.S. release. They tell me that business actually increased after its first week at the Paris Theater in Manhattan because of strong word-of-mouth; now it’s opening at a number of Laemmle Theaters in Los Angeles, with other cities to follow in the weeks and months ahead.

Tarzan Swings Again

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • October 26, 2010 5:00 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Umgawa! Every generation has its own image of Tarzan, from beefy Elmo Lincoln in 1918 to Disney’s muscular animated incarnation of 1999, but for die-hard movie buffs, former Olympian Johnny Weissmuller remains the definitive Ape Man. What’s more, the films that cemented his image as Edgar Rice Burroughs’ lord of the jungle have retained a special fascination for anyone who grew up with them, when they were new in the 1930s or years later on television.
More: Journal

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