Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
leonardmaltin
Contact Leonard at MovieCrazyMail@maltinmovies.com


Click inside the box for details




Leonard Maltin

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • December 18, 2013 12:00 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
At a time when so many comedies try to push the boundary lines of raunchiness as far as they can, this one deals in another, much rarer, commodity: sheer silliness.

The Best Movies You've Missed This Year

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • November 25, 2013 10:04 PM
  • |
  • 5 Comments
McConaughey, Gosling, Cooper, O'Dowd, Carell, and More.

The Way, Way Back

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • July 5, 2013 12:00 AM
  • |
  • 5 Comments
This is my favorite film of the summer so far. It entertained me and left me with a feeling of satisfaction that’s all too rare, especially at this time of year...

Hope Springs—movie review

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • August 8, 2012 1:00 AM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
First, the good news: here is a Hollywood movie for adults that deals fairly honestly with a relatable, real-life situation: a marriage that has become so routine there is no evidence of love anymore. Vanessa Taylor’s screenplay gives Meryl Streep the opportunity to build an empathetic and believable character, a woman who is so frustrated that she has reached a breaking point.

Crazy, Stupid, Love.

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • July 29, 2011 4:25 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
When a movie opens with a woman telling her husband that she wants a divorce after twenty-five years of marriage and it isn’t played for laughs, you know you’re not in for a “typical” Hollywood comedy. Given the current state of comedy, that’s not necessarily a bad thing, but what we get instead is an odd, meandering, mood-swinging movie called Crazy, Stupid, Love. (Yes, there’s a period at the end of the title, for no apparent reason.)

film review: Dinner For Schmucks

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • July 31, 2010 6:26 AM
  • |
  • 3 Comments
I’d like to extoll the virtues of a great comedy, but this isn’t it. A word of explanation: I come to Dinner for Schmucks at a disadvantage, because I love the French film on which it’s based, The Dinner Game (1998). I’ve also heard its creator, the brilliant writer-director Francis Veber, describe his filmmaking philosophy, and criticize Hollywood colleagues for always wanting to expand and complicate his material. (The Birdcage is the best translation ever made of a Veber property, but I still prefer his original, La Cage aux Folles.)

Email Updates