leonardmaltin
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Leonard Maltin

CURE FOR A MOVIE HANGOVER

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • January 4, 2013 1:00 AM
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  • 3 Comments
I love watching movies, but it becomes challenging during December when the year’s lengthiest and most ambitious films arrive all at once. By the time I’m done digesting, writing about and voting for them, I need a breather. That’s when I start reading, for pleasure, and watching vintage B movies—even while exercising. I’ll review some of the show-business books I read during the next week, but I also took a tip from "The New Yorker’s" Anthony Lane in his review of "Killing Them Softly."

Going Movie Crazy Again

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • October 1, 2012 1:00 AM
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  • 1 Comment
A decade ago I launched a newsletter for old-movie buffs. I’ve had a ball doing it, but I haven’t been able to maintain a regular publishing schedule. Last month I vowed to catch up a bit, so now there are two new issues hot off the press, #29 and #30. My leading story is a two-part exploration of how the 1941 Warner Bros. movie 'Blues in the Night' came about.

Raymond Scott Back On The Big Screen

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • July 12, 2012 1:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
If you grew up watching Warner Bros. cartoons, you know the music of Raymond Scott, even if his name isn’t familiar. He was an innovative musician and composer whose propulsive, syncopated piece “Powerhouse” was adopted by Warner’s music director Carl Stalling as a recurring theme in his Looney Tunes scores.

From Renoir To Ellington: Scanning Recent DVDs

  • By Leonard Maltin
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  • March 12, 2012 1:07 AM
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  • 1 Comment
I haven’t been able to keep up with Twilight Time’s limited-edition DVD and Blu-ray releases since the company launched last year, so it’s ironic that the first disc I’ve spent real time with—Jean Renoir’s 'Swamp Water' (1941)—benefits least from the label’s innovative offering of isolated music tracks. That feature is much more valuable in other Twilight Time releases with scores by Bernard Herrmann, Franz Waxman, Hugo Friedhofer, et al., as well as 'Picnic', which I’ll discuss in a moment.

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