Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
leonardmaltin
Contact Leonard at MovieCrazyMail@maltinmovies.com


Click inside the box for details




Leonard Maltin

My Oscar Best Picture Breakdown

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • January 28, 2011 5:30 AM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
Entertainment Tonight asked me to provide some thoughts about all of this year's Best Picture nominees. Here are the results at ETOnline.

5,000 Fingers…And More

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • January 26, 2011 5:30 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment

Oscar Looks Beyond Hollywood

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • January 25, 2011 6:49 AM
  • |
  • 9 Comments
Considering that the membership of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is comprised of people who work in the mainstream movie industry, it’s encouraging to see that they refuse to follow the company line and repeatedly honor good work from the independent film world and foreign countries. Some major players lobbied hard, and spent untold thousands of dollars, to attract Academy interest this year, but the voting members opted for actors like Javier Bardem, Jennifer Lawrence, and Michelle Williams and films like Winter’s Bone, Blue Valentine, and Rabbit Hole instead.

German Film History Uncovered

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • January 24, 2011 5:29 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment
A beautiful poster for Das alte Gesetz (The Old Law), from 1923, a seeming precursor to The Jazz Singer about a rabbi’s son who becomes a successful stage actor.
More: Journal

My Award Show Diary

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • January 18, 2011 5:00 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
Bill Murray waxes eloquent about Sofia Coppola at the National Board of Review awards.
More: Journal

CRUISING THROUGH THE HOLIDAYS

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • January 5, 2011 5:00 AM
  • |
  • 4 Comments
It may not sound like work, because I’m lucky enough to combine business and pleasure, but I lecture on Princess Cruises. For a year-end trip through the Panama Canal I was asked to introduce four of my favorite unsung films of 2010, and I was happy to do so. City Island was by far the audience favorite—people thanked me for days after the screening—but Mother and Child was also well received, along with Flipped and The Winning Season. Seasoned film-buff passengers also fared quite well with my session of movie trivia, scoring 17 out of a possible 20.
More: Journal

Remembering “Hollywood And The Stars”

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • December 30, 2010 5:00 AM
  • |
  • 11 Comments
It’s that time when we look back and remember the people who’ve pass on during 2010. (If you haven’t seen Turner Classic Movies’ always-incredible memorial segment, you should: www.tcm.com) One of those who left our midst was producer David L. Wolper. When I read his obituary in August, I knew it would focus on his early success with television documentaries like The Making of the President, his epic miniseries Roots, his well-loved feature Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, and his spectacular opening ceremonies for the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles.
More: Journal

Scanning The Movie Year

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • December 27, 2010 5:00 AM
  • |
  • 13 Comments
Like any critic, I have an ego: it comes with the territory, or I couldn’t express my opinion with confidence. Imagine what it’s like, then, to sit in a room with forty other critics—each one certain and confident—and try to reach a consensus, as I do with my colleagues in the Los Angeles Film Critics Association every December. We meet in person and vote out loud, using a point system to determine the most popular candidates in every category; then we have a runoff show of hands between the two top vote-getters to determine who wins. (If you’d like to see all of this year’s winners, or learn more about our group and its members,—

MR. DeMILLE, MEET MR. DISNEY

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • December 23, 2010 5:00 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
When I first became interested in old-time radio I didn’t comprehend just how strong a connection existed between the empire of the air and the movie industry during the 1930s, 40s, and 50s. At first, Hollywood was wary of radio, just as it would be when television came along. Then the powers-that-be realized that radio wasn’t the enemy: it was a potential ally, capable of promoting its stars and upcoming movies to an enormous audience.
More: Journal

DORIS DAY SPEAKS!

  • By Leonard Maltin
  • |
  • December 20, 2010 5:00 AM
  • |
  • 8 Comments
There aren’t many true movie stars still with us from Hollywood’s golden age, or even from the 1950s and 60s, when the studio era was on the wane. But one star who occupied a unique place in America’s heart, as a top box-office attraction and a top-selling recording artist at the same time, is still alive and well: Doris Day. She avoids the limelight and hasn’t appeared on camera in many years. (I felt very lucky to spend some time with her for Entertainment Tonight in 1993, during a weekend-long fundraiser she held for her Animal League.)
More: Journal

Email Updates