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peterbogdanovich Peter Bogdanovich
Blogdanovich is the blog of director, producer, writer, actor, film critic, and author Peter Bogdanovich. He has directed over 25 feature films including international award winners The Last Picture Show, What’s Up, Doc?, Paper Moon, Daisy Miller, Saint Jack, Mask; cult favorites Targets, Texasville, Noises Off, They All Laughed, and A The Thing Called Love, among stars he’s introduced: Cybill Shepherd, Tatum O’Neal, Madeline Kahn, John Ritter, Sandra Bullock; has directed stars Audrey Hepburn, Barbra Streisand, Michael Caine, Cher; best-sellers Who the Devil Made It: Who the Hell's In It, The Killing of the Unicorn; standard texts John Ford, This is Orson Welles; and was a recurring guest-star on the popular HBO series The Sopranos.

Peter Bogdanovich

Ball of Fire

  • By Peter Bogdanovich
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  • August 31, 2010 9:24 AM
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  • 5 Comments
Gary Cooper was the archetypal American long before either John Wayne or James Stewart moved into that spot, but he died relatively young fifty years ago and the passionate fervor with which he was adored has been forgotten.  His tall good looks combined with a little-boy innocence was like catnip for women:  the word is that of all Hollywood players, Cooper had the highest score.  His acting style was imitable but not emulatable.  Orson Welles told me he’d stood not more than three feet away from Coop while a close-up of the actor was being made and was convinced that it would have to be re-taken because he could see nothing happening.  When he later saw the dailies, Welles was astonished by the subtle play of expression the camera had caught.  “I swear I could see none of that from three feet away!”  This was Cooper’s mystery, and it made him a born picture-star…

Meet Me in St. Louis

  • By Peter Bogdanovich
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  • August 31, 2010 9:22 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Gene Kelly is often credited as the key man in the birth of the modern movie musical of the late 1940s, but Gene himself said he felt the first modern picture musical was released in 1944, starred Judy Garland as she became a woman, and was directed by her soon-to-be first husband, Vincente Minnelli—only his third picture: That charming Technicolor piece of early 1900s’ Americana (based on the book by Sally Benson), Meet Me in St. Louis (available on DVD).

Love Affair

  • By Peter Bogdanovich
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  • August 31, 2010 9:19 AM
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  • 0 Comments
The movie that inspired the popular Sleepless in Seattle (1993), director-producer Leo McCarey’s An Affair to Remember (1957) with Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr, was actually the remake of a picture McCarey had conceived and directed nineteen years before with the suave French star Charles Boyer and the elegantly delightful Irene Dunne: A picture McCarey preferred to his second version, and one of the most affecting romantic comedy-dramas ever made, 1939’s now very rarely seen LOVE AFFAIR (available on DVD).

A Woman Under the Influence

  • By Peter Bogdanovich
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  • August 31, 2010 9:15 AM
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  • 5 Comments
In the history of America’s modern independent film, Orson Welles was first—-with his self-financed 1952 production of Othello—-and next, eight years later, came John Cassavetes with his self-financed Shadows.  Like Welles, Cassavetes used his acting salaries (mainly from indifferent films or TV shows) to pay for his directing-writing career, and to keep himself free and his pictures made without interference or compromise.  To protect the work, he even self-distributed two of the most successful of independent films:  his first mature masterpiece, Faces (1968), and A WOMAN UNDER THE INFLUENCE (available on DVD), perhaps his finest film, Oscar-nominated for Best Director and Best Actress—-the sublime Gena Rowlands, Cassavetes’ favorite player, and wife of over three decades.  Recently, the picture was correctly designated a “National Treasure” by the Library of Congress.

Publications

  • By Peter Bogdanovich
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  • August 24, 2010 8:43 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Publications

Filmography

  • By Peter Bogdanovich
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  • August 2, 2010 8:40 AM
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  • 3 Comments
Filmography

Biography

  • By Peter Bogdanovich
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  • August 1, 2010 4:07 AM
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  • 4 Comments
After spending most of his teens studying acting with the legendary Stella Adler, and working as an actor in live TV and various theaters around the country, including the New York and the American Shakespeare Festivals, Peter Bogdanovich at age 20 began directing plays Off-Broadway and in N.Y. summer theater. He also wrote for the Museum of Modern Art a series of three monographs on Orson Welles, Howard Hawks, and Alfred Hitchcock, the first such retrospective studies of these directors in America. He also began writing a classic series of feature articles and profiles for Esquire, doing the ground-breaking Humphrey Bogart tribute, as well as definitive pieces on James Stewart, Jerry Lewis, and John Ford, among others.

Welcome to Blogdanovich

  • By Peter Bogdanovich
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  • January 28, 2010 12:02 AM
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  • 59 Comments
A couple of people suggested I do a blog about older films. I had no idea what a blog was. A blob? No, blog! Eventually I was guided into the computer world of the 21st century. And I find it’s a very congenial, personal way of communicating with you, where if you’re interested in seeing a movie I’m recommending, you can practically push two buttons and look at the picture, or certainly within a day or so; the same with books I might encourage you to read. It feels more like an intimate one-on-one experience—I’m right here in your own private computer, talking to you.

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