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BADLANDS: Terrence Malick’s “early, funny film”

Malick’s 1973 debut "Badlands" is, thus far, the only film in his oeuvre in which humor is a significant component. If it isn’t a black comedy, then it is a singular and timeless art-house crime drama infused with greyish-brownish comedy.
  • By Lincoln Flynn
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  • April 22, 2013 8:35 AM
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  • 0 Comments

The Venice International Film Festival reviews are in. Viva Italia!

EDITOR'S NOTE: Writer Tommaso Tocci is covering the Venice International Film Festival for Press Play this year and so we have created this landing page which collects all of those links together. Here they are.
  • By Tommaso Tocci
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  • September 7, 2012 10:36 AM
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  • 0 Comments

VENICE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL: Terrence Malick's TO THE WONDER

A movement from the universal to the particular: that’s what Terrence Malick’s "To the Wonder" feels like, a year after "The Tree of Life."
  • By Tommaso Tocci
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  • September 2, 2012 1:03 PM
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OSCARS DEATH RACE: Surveying the race for Best Director and Cinematography

Perhaps I should have given each of these categories its own piece, but I don't think you can separate them, and also, we're running out of time here. Let's take cinematography first.
  • By Sarah D. Bunting
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  • February 26, 2012 5:24 AM
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OSCARS DEATH RACE: TREE OF LIFE

It's it fair to review a work that functions, as Roger Ebert said in his piece on "The Tree of Life," as more of a prayer than a story? Can we measure this intensely personal, individual film with traditional yardsticks? I believe it is; I believe we can. Some of the positive reviews of "The Tree of Life" seem defensive to the point of stridency, meeting charges of "but there's no narrative!" with a carpet-bombing of superlatives, and implying between salvos that such an unconventional and daring form of filmic storytelling has no use for bourgeois adjectives like "linear" and "coherent." Well…actually, on the one hand, I agree, in the sense that Malick has his ways of doing things and thinking about stories and connecting (or shuffling) dots, and that peculiar Malickian blend of compulsive control and sticky viscera either hits you or it doesn't, so no review per se is going to change your mind.
  • By Sarah D. Bunting
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  • February 24, 2012 12:35 PM
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'SHOULD WIN' VIDEO ESSAY SERIES: Best Picture TREE OF LIFE

All of the 2011 Best Picture nominees have their merits, but one towers above the rest: "The Tree of Life," writer/director Terrence Malick's film about...well what is "The Tree of Life" about, anyway? For a free-associative non-linear movie that skips back and forth through time and space, and that includes a lengthy early section recounting the creation of the universe, the movie was a surprising commercial success, dominating discussion among cinephiles throughout a summer moviegoing season that is usually overshadowed by much louder, dumber movies. And at the center of the discussion were very basic questions about writing and direction – about storytelling generally – that cut to the heart of what movies are and what they can be.
  • By Matt Zoller Seitz & Serena Bramble
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  • February 21, 2012 12:13 PM
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  • 26 Comments

TRAILER: Terrence Malick's TREE OF LULZ (Hey, it could have happened. . .)

Annals of film history are filled with masterpieces that never were. Cineastes spend many a sleepless night thinking of Stanley Kubrick’s unproduced epic on Napoleon’s life. Film historians still search every nook and cranny to possibly locate Orson Welles’ first cut of The Magnificent Ambersons. Then there is the original script for John Huston’s Freud: The Secret passion that a little known philosopher by the name of Jean-Paul Sartre wrote; and Aldous Huxley’s Alice and the Mysterious Mr. Carroll, which was an amalgam of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Through the Looking Glass, and the biography of Lewis Carroll, of which Walt Disney said: “[The script] was so literary I could understand only every third word.” There are many, many more, and probably none of these intriguing projects will ever get to see the light of day. But don’t despair, gentle reader. As a late Christmas present, PressPlay is proud to offer you a glimpse of another masterpiece that could have been. Drown your cinephile sorrows in this.
  • By Kevin B. Lee & Ali Arikan
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  • December 28, 2011 3:27 AM
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VERTIGOED: THE THIN RED LINE

  • By Cole Smith
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  • May 1, 2011 12:25 AM
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VERTIGOED: BADLANDS

  • By Emma Phelps
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  • May 1, 2011 12:08 AM
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  • 0 Comments

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