In the Absence of Serious American Drama, A New Movie About Batman Captures the Heart of a Nation

By robbiefreeling | REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog July 21, 2008 at 6:11AM

In the Absence of Serious American Drama, A New Movie About Batman Captures the Heart of a Nation
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AP, Sunday, 12:32 a.m.

Christopher Nolan's new movie about Batman and Big Themes, like Duality, The Dark Knight took the nation's movie houses and film critics by storm this weekend. Words like "operatic" and "Shakespearean" were bandied about by moviegoers and online film writers whose background in opera and Shakespeare is limited at best, but who prefer their "classical, serious" films with a dose of cool gadgets. When asked about the success of the latest film in the franchise which transformed him from a mediocre, strictly technical indie actor to a mediocre, strictly technical Hollywood star, reclusive Christian Bale responded in a gruff, gravely, very masculine voice not unlike that of the muppet Dr. Teeth, "I think moviegoers were just really hungry for something that would challenge their preconceived notions of good and evil, right and wrong, all that stuff; but they prefer to have that message delivered by a comic book superhero that they've admired since they were children." Cinema-lovers have responded in droves, especially males, who have already helped catapult Nolan's sequel to the much coveted number one spot of all-time movies on the IMDb top 250 films list—not bad for a film that has been in general release for only three days. Especially pleased with the success of the film are all those adult Americans who have never seen a film made outside of this country and who have never attended the theater. When asked the source of the film's magic, superfan Jim Cherrystone, of Somerville, MA, responded, "I think people are just relieved that there's still serious films being made. I haven't been this excited about true art since reading about Harry Potter and his little witch friends casting spells. With JK Rowling's last Potter installment, books may be over, but it looks like movies got a stay of execution." Film critics were just as jazzed as the film's makers and its boyish fans, even proud to consider themselves part of the film's creation, in a way. "I think it's the critic's duty to tell people how awesome this movie is," said Insert-Pullquote Pete, of the Toulane Tribune. "Thank God there's finally a movie that audiences and critics can agree on, cause it makes our job so much easier."

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