The Choice Is Yours

By robbiefreeling | REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog July 28, 2006 at 7:56AM

The Choice Is Yours
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There’s a wealth of oddities in theaters this weekend, and RS is there. Sigh. Check out our latest reviews, up on the main site, and pick which best suits your personality. Do you prefer your wizened New York-born-and-bred Jews to be scurrying around London with buxom blondes (Scoop), or hidden behind a Greenwich Village restaurant counter screaming at patrons and slinging hash (I Like Killing Flies)? Do you prefer your boys united in their love of ass-pounding (Another Gay Movie) or literally joined at the hip (Brothers of the Head)? Something for everyone? Nah, something for the very special few. Check out more below, and happy weekend.


“The pleasure you take in Scoop depends entirely on how much slack you're willing to cut Woody Allen. Has the reservoir of goodwill, left empty after a half-decade drought, been replenished by Match Point? Or have the accumulated disappointments of a faltering legend bred an enduring skepticism? Read more…

"In an age where laborious rituals of self-transformation are so imperative, from joining the gym to hooking our bodies up to tissue vacuums and silicone pumps, it's unsurprising that we have a certain preoccupation with the easy auto-mutilation of severe birth defects. Brothers of the Head appeals to this sort of morbidity while graciously pretending to critique it, and meanwhile contains the singularly democratic balance of visual pleasure and pain one expects from a good horror film." Read more…

"One could quibble that gays finally having their own Scary Movie might be as dubious a distinction, as say, oh, the first gay western, but Another Gay Movie is so rabidly forthright in its splattering of orifice-indiscriminate man-juices that it reaches a level of almost cleansingly ribald sadism. Indeed its crosscut climactic triumvirate of ass-pounding reaches levels of decadent perversity normally unseen outside a Tsai Ming-liang closing sequence." Read more…

"Jewish, Mexican, Chinese, Cuban, even Senegalese dishes spike the menu at Shopsin’s, even though the tangiest flavor, and what people come back for repeatedly, as the film alleges, is the candor, and occasional volatility, of Kenny Shopsin himself. The choice is yours: did you come to Shopsin’s for the social commentary or the “Postmodern Pancakes” (cooked, then mashed up with batter, and put back on the griddle, FYI)?" Read more…