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"Uptown Saturday Night" Remake w/ Denzel Washington, Will Smith Finds A Director

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by Tambay A. Obenson
April 26, 2012 8:31 PM
48 Comments
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Uptown

I'm actually getting tired of talking about this project, and almost didn't post this new piece of news; alas, I am posting it.

Seems strange to me that it's taking so long for it to get off the ground.

Years ago, Will Smith expressed interest in remaking the Sidney Poitier/Bill Cosby 70s film, Uptown Saturday Night. However, sadly for Smith, and despite sounding like a possible all-star African American Ocean’s Eleven-style romp, very little actually happened on the project since he acquired the rights, even though Smith had reportedly also talked with Eddie Murphy, Martin Lawrence, and Denzel Washington about co-starring.

2 years ago, Warner Bros was on the hunt for a writer to rewrite the most recent draft of the script at the time, which was penned by Cop Out’s Mark and Robb Cullen. It looked like the project would surely happen, and was only a matter of when.

A year later, Warner Bros. and Will Smith's Overbrook Entertainment brought on comedy writer Tim Dowling to rewrite the Uptown Saturday Night script, with David Dobkin (who? Oh yeah, the guy who directed Shanghai Knights and Wedding Crashers) attached to direct.

Last I wrote about this earlier this year an update stated that writer Tim Dowling (This Means War) (who was hired last year to pen the script) had finished and turned it in, and that Will Smith and Denzel Washington were still very much attached to star in the roles originated by Sidney Poitier and Bill Cosby in the 1974 film.

Here's what Dowling revealed about his take on the story:

"Will Smith is producing it. He hired me to write it because he liked the script for 'This Mean's War.' He and Denzel Washington grew up loving the original... It’s been a fun one to write, I just turned it in. We’re all hoping it’s something [Washington] wants do... the funny thing is, Will is so funny but hasn’t done a comedy in a while and Denzel I don’t think has ever done a comedy. I think the pairing would be great... David Dobkin is attached to direct it and hopefully we’ll get that going... The best way to describe it is a 'one crazy night' movie but it's not just one night... Both of the main characters are blue collar guys, one doesn’t get a promotion, one’s business isn’t doing great, they go out for a night and get caught up in something they need to find their way out of. It’s similar in tone to 'The Hangover.' I think it will be really fun."

Things that make you go hmmm, right? Obviously, still not a lot to go on here, so I'll reserve comment till we know more. I do like the emphasis on so-called "blue collar guys" though.

It's been announced today that Adam McKay (Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy) is signing on to direct the film, still with Smith and Washington starring, after he directs the sequel to Anchorman. which is expected to start shooting in 2013 for a 2014 release; so it looks like, as long as nothing more changes, we shouldn't expect to see the Uptown Saturday Night remake until at least 2014.

As an aside...  said it before, and I'm going to continue saying it. It's just baffling to me that throughout all these flip-flops of writers and directors, not one of the names mentioned is African American. Seriously though, these jobs really could have gone to a black writer and a black director, couldn't they? If only to keep it somewhat in the spirit that the first trio of films were made - all 3 directed by Sidney Poitier; 2 written by African American playwright Richard Wesley; the other by Charles Blackwell, also African American.

There certainly are a few of them (writers and directors of African descent) who could use the work, and I think do a serviceable job with the project.

It's one of those films that would be sold mainly on its big name stars, and not who's directing or writing it, so why not give a brotha or sistah a shot?

Of course I'm assuming that Will Smith and Denzel Washington combined are powerful enough in this industry to have some influence on who gets to write and/direct films they are in - this particular film anyway. Especially Will Smith. 

Anyway... so it goes... moving on... obviously the remake will likely diverge from the original storyline.

Stay tuned…

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48 Comments

  • Joyce Jackson | July 29, 2012 4:40 PMReply

    Just today my husband was talking a about a remake of Uptown Saturday Night and we thought about Will Smith, Martin Lawrence and Jamie Foxx would be hilarious!

  • kknotu | April 30, 2012 7:42 PMReply

    I have all three movies in my personal collection and would enjoy seeing if they could do a remake any justice

  • Fidel | April 30, 2012 2:51 PMReply

    I've never even heard of this movie. I just read the article because it had Saturday Night and Denzel Washington in the title. Oh, and because of the picture of Bill Cosby and Sidney Poitier. But I agree with some of you...leave classics alone. Let 2012 be the death of remakes. I understand that there is no originality left in the world but damn, there are other stories to be told.

  • Ava | April 29, 2012 9:51 PMReply

    From what I've gleaned about the writing process, the more times a script changes hands (re-writes), the less it bodes well for the final draft and the finished product. That 'too many cooks..' proverb doesn't come from thin air. Not too mention that I heard about Will Smith's production company buying the rights about a decade ago-- were they in danger of losing the rights to make this film? Oh dear, I think I'm getting fatigued with the very idea of this remake already.

  • NOTAVA | May 1, 2012 7:40 PM

    Why are you never answering if you are Ava Duvernay or not when people keep asking you. Why are you posing?

  • Neziah | April 28, 2012 1:20 AMReply

    I smell a flop and critical failure. Leave classic black comedies alone. What's next, are they going to remake "Cooley High" with Kyle Massey and Christopher Massey?

  • Miles Ellison | April 28, 2012 1:05 AMReply

    There are a lot of red flags waving here. Hack director. Hack writer. By the time it actually gets made, it will probably have Seth Rogen and Jonah Hill starring and Judd Apatow directing.

  • CareyCarey | April 27, 2012 11:13 PMReply

    Damn Miles, I should have asked somebody! I just received an e-mail and I am sure you know what it said? Well... since you didn't speak on it I'll keep it close to my vest. But man, you can answer many of my questions. What's the connection between the director and the storyline? Also, I've been around many gays of the butch type. The actors in Pariah killed those parts. Were many of them of the gay persuasion? What was the point of the strap-on if this was going to be "her" coming out party? Also, the opening scene was an attention grabber, what was the thoughts behind including it at the beginning of the film?

  • Mark & Darla | April 27, 2012 4:11 PMReply

    Will Smith is a jerk and prick.

  • TCM | April 27, 2012 2:06 PMReply

    Wesley is still around teaching at NYU. He couldn't have been brought on or consulted?

  • Ava | April 29, 2012 9:45 PM

    He is head of the Dept now. He was one of my professors and a sometime adviser. I found him to be very supportive and encouraging of my work. It's been awhile since I've been in touch so I have no idea about how he feels about this remake.

  • Said in Los Angeles | April 27, 2012 1:10 PMReply

    The concern I understand, yet why waste energy on stressing that the studios aren't approaching black folks? Why do they have too? They'll approach who they want to. My concern is why wait on a remake when something in a similar vain/genre can be produced now with many of the outstanding talents that read Shadow & Act?

  • Nadine | April 27, 2012 11:40 AMReply

    "As an aside... said it before, and I'm going to continue saying it. It's just baffling to me that throughout all these flip-flops of writers and directors, not one of the names mentioned is African American. Seriously though, these jobs really could have gone to a black writer and a black director, couldn't they? If only to keep it somewhat in the spirit that the first trio of films were made - all 3 directed by Sidney Poitier; 2 written by African American playwright Richard Wesley; the other by Charles Blackwell, also African American." - TAMBAY. I understand your concern, but at this point, I kind of compare these Black writers to TYPHOID MARY. These writers who are so diseased that everything they touch becomes a means of transmission and no matter how hard others try to track down and recreate "Mary's" tracks, for a multitude of reasons, including further proliferating the disease to the amusement of the mainstream, the insidiousness of the CARRIER of the disease cannot replicated and NO ONE can spread a disease and decimate the Black American community like these Black Hollywood writers. NO ONE... Tambay, we cannot keep in the spirit of the original writers because they had more depth and dignity which, after handing over our culture to the American mainstream/corporations, the Black community has been missing for generations... again... I blame P. Diddy (I'm not even joking)...

  • other song | April 27, 2012 11:00 AMReply

    just appalling. I think I speak for everyone that just wants a great movie, regardless of who writes it. But this really is a case where a Black director/writer could have easily been approached to do the work. are you telling me there are no competent Black writers or directors who could have been considered? The guy who wrote "This Means War"? really? I didn't read the original script but that movie was panned hard and barely made its money back. So competence isn't really an issue here. It's like Will and Denzel would prefer to go with a substandard White writer than to even approach any Black writers. Just wow

  • THE BLACK POLICE | April 27, 2012 9:48 AMReply

    Who are some of the black writers you would suggest if (hypothetically) you were consulted?

  • bama | May 1, 2012 7:42 PM

    Why does have he have to offer a substitute for his critique to be valid?

  • Dee | May 1, 2012 6:59 PM

    I smell Planty McPlant.

    Go away Planty. We'll have none of your dissenting here.

  • vdub | April 27, 2012 3:46 AMReply

    this makes me sad. period. the original movie was my allllll time favorite as a young teen. i remember falling out of my seat onto the theatre floor literally lmbao. and now to read this convoluted series of events to bring the remake to the screen -- seriously? and i totally feel you on the director and writer issue... mebbe they should just ask sir sidney to direct it... HA!

  • misha | April 27, 2012 1:13 AMReply

    Sad and very telling when Bill "The Trayvon case isn't about race" Cosby seems more progressive and daring than the likes of Will Smith. Also, this project sounds like it can't possibly compare to the original. So why even bother? Why not just make a black version of The Hangover?

  • Ken | April 30, 2012 4:46 PM

    @Nadine
    I never said anything about a black man. Nothing against you but I'm just tired of the "Shame" reference as if it's something more than what it really is.

  • CareyCarey | April 30, 2012 1:10 PM

    "Don't play a playa!" Now Nadine, I am laughing with you because that was my exact thought. I could be wrong but I viewed the "sky sky" comment and others, as slightly condescending. Nevertheless, I've been trying to say that this medium - a board - is probably one of the worst places to have a serious debate. !1) S & A's comment section is ass-backward, in that a reply is listed ahead of the comment it's responding to. And it's very difficult to discern which comment, or person, one is replying to. 2) Since there is no moderator, a person can drop several issues/points/concerns/questions in one post. Consequently, it's damn near impossible to address them all (without writing 10 pages), especially if they've gone off topic and/or presented something as facts instead of their opinion 3) Time lapse between comment and rebuttle leaves one questioning or forgetting what they were even talking about. 4) My concerns with "ambiguity" has more to do with a person's inability to stop the other person from continuing when something isn't clear, than any one thing you've said. Granted, it may seem obvious and clear to the writer, however, if the recipient has questions or is not understanding exactly what's being presented or what the other is trying to say, the conversation has broken down, regardless of who's at "fault". So, in short, considering all the mine fields and pot holes mentioned above, and many I didn't mention, I believe we've both been on a fool's errand. :-) So yeah, I agree, lets call this one another love TKO.

  • Nadine | April 30, 2012 12:06 PM

    @KEN and @CAREYCAREY - Here's what I'm not getting from you all. What portion of your reticence over the film has to do with its MALE LEAD? I'm just wondering because it hadn't even occurred to me that that would be the problem from the Black male's P.O.V. I was like "thank you, Steve, for not making him a BM"... from @KEN, I'm hearing "explicit sexuality of a white male " ... ummm, is that supposed to be a good thing? I thought that was gross... interesting Also what would you call R&B and commercial rap music in the U.S. other than an expression of the VIRILITY of the Black "man". Boring... @CAREYCAREY - you're too obvious... I knew you would grab onto the "sky is blue". Don't play a playa'! Lenses are somewhat interchangeable. There is an entire portion of basic expository writing devoted to this. When I use "lens" I mean it, but I make a point of not including one's willingness to view a situation through the lens of another. That's where I won't spend too much time talkin'... I'm too haggard, at this point to try to work through the unwillingness that makes it impossible to continue.

  • Nadine | April 30, 2012 11:48 AM

    @CAREYCAREY - " 'the specifics of the stories are where the two movies should not even be considered in general comparison. PARIAH is nothing like PRECIOUS outside of the downtrodden darkie female trope'. Yes... one more time... we have weighted aspects of each story...differently." - you. It almost sounded as if you were signifying... The statement you cited of mine was nowhere near ambiguous. Maybe another word, but ambiguous, it was not. Also, I'm sorry that was the only thing you could get out of my reply to you. Did you not think that molestation and incest was a significant part of the story of PRECIOUS? Also, were you attempting to problematize me for pointing out the most obvious connection, or lack thereof... "darkie female trope"... which was offensive to you, I guess? Maybe that was not your issue but your reply to me was ironically ambiguous. Was that intentional? Can you be more specific with what you are trying to say to me regarding my response to you? I fear no questions or possible response I could give. You sometimes try to figure out my feelings on one topic (when we are engaged in conversation) based on my thoughts on another which would be fine if I were the type to not be transparent, but if you just ask me the question straight up, I'll give you the answer. I will on the boards and I do in person as well. Just ask me, my dear CAREY. You know I'll always try to honor your thoughts, but my point is that I cannot, especially over the boards, try to encroach my POV when it does not advance or even align with your beliefs which I steadily gained more insight to as we continued to discuss SHAME, and my basically forcing you to watch it. I learned/accepted that it would be wrong of me to force you to watch something that you feel strongly about not seeing. At the same time, some of your statements, based on hearsay, were incorrect about the movie so when you would debate the movie with others, I could see you were giving them ammunition because your statements, always consistent, were based on the characterizations from someone else and their having watched specific portions of the piece. I can tell you right now that your characterizations of Marianne's time in the film and the extent of her speaking role is off and anyone who saw the film would know that therefore your other arguments would lose their impact. That was ONE of the reasons I wanted you to watch. Anyway... I have to get going. Help me understand what you would like me to gleam from your last statement, because I don't quite understand it. Just a short summary, I just need clarity cause I'm weening myself of the boards, but don't want to leave anything up for misinterpretation.

  • CareyCarey | April 30, 2012 10:43 AM

    "I am thinking, especially after @KEN's reply down there that I am wasting my time trying to convince people that the sky is blue... - you. Good point... especially if and when the sky is NOT blue. A person errs when they try to convince others that their opinions are facts. I am suggesting (AGAIN) the following statement is the most pertinent comment in this whole discussion--> "I'm guessing that we have weighted aspects of each story...differently... based on our individual lenses, therefore we will not be able to find common ground". Yep! It goes without question that everyone does not view films from the same perspective as you. Consequently, one might consider it a fool's errand to try convincing another person that your vision and outlook on films - any film - is the "correct" one.

  • CareyCarey | April 30, 2012 10:04 AM

    "Anyway, I'm guessing that we have weighted aspects of each story...differently... based on our individual lenses, therefore we will not be able to find common ground" ~Nadine . Now we've reached an agreement. I mean, we can't continue... comments like the following only lead to a never ending circle of ambiquity--> "the specifics of the stories are where the two movies should not even be considered in general comparison. PARIAH is nothing like PRECIOUS outside of the downtrodden darkie female trope". Yes... one more time... we have weighted aspects of each story...differently.

  • Nadine | April 30, 2012 8:46 AM

    CAREY... Mary, when masturbating (don't get me started), would call for Precious to finish the job. Incest from both parents. This was in the movie, but we only saw Mary's part in those acts while we were left to infer from Precious' pregnancy her "father's" role. Antwone Fisher sexually abused by a woman...TSTATJ...you know... The DEVIL is in the details... is a common, or was a common idiom. In other words, the disingenuous/duplicitous manner in the specifics or of how something is put together... We can speak in generalities about two movies and make superficial comparisons (finding connections), but the specifics of the stories are where the two movies should not even be considered in general comparison. PARIAH is nothing like PRECIOUS outside of the downtrodden darkie female trope. I am thinking, especially after @KEN's reply down there that I am wasting my time trying to convince people that the sky is blue...you did not trigger this in me, but PRECIOUS sure as heck does... it's just that things are so bad when we as a people cannot see that Black people in America, specifically Black women, are not situated in a safe place where "movies" like PRECIOUS with its consistent negative imagery happily placed into the zeitgeist by Black men (doing the work more thoroughly than White Hollywood ever could) first comedically (Big Momma's house series, Norbit, obese mammy's in commercials,etc...starting in 2000), and now under the guise of sociology (as if PRECIOUS is a case study on Black motherhood - don't forget the BLIND SIDE came out the same year) should be counter intuitive and is just plain evil... Neen's story I get (http://blogs.indiewire.com/shadowandact/watch-now-affecting-doc-on-triumph-over-trauma-drug-addiction-healing-neen#5b7234e0-92b6-11e1-a232-1231381613d6), but even she doesn't know or didn't acknowledge for the documentary the roots of her story because we didn't hear her speak of her mother's background. The mother was CLEARLY born of alcohol (her mother's facial features clearly exhibit the symptoms of severe fetal alcohol syndrome/spectrum which is INSIDIOUS and INCURABLE and turns the brain SOCIOPATHIC - don't let anyone tell you otherwise) but we never hear of these things because Alcohol lobbyists in D.C. want to keep that information from the general public - the fact that crack-cocaine's effects on a fetus is NOTHING compared to ALCOHOL'S effects....nothing... Anyway, I'm guessing that we have weighted aspects of each story...differently... based on our individual lenses, therefore we will not be able to find common ground unless I put in more work in than I am willing. Again, nothing personal, but I'm just tired of this "money" focused, drug dealer-like, sold-out negro way of pimping Black culture to the masses (which always seems to be focused on the women, for some reason when foul, but COOL when it is about the men). I'm tired of the division...idk. I work very hard behind-the-scenes to keep a balance ... forget it. I'm just done. Tired. Anyway before I sign-off, I need a break from the disappointment (12 years still kickin' my ass), I will answer your questions to the best of my abilities. "...was Pariah and Precious both about a young lady finding/discovering herself while dealing with family strife?"...every movie with a chick in it is about discovery. You might as well throw in the movie "THE HOLIDAY" with Cameron Diaz...or "JUNO" ... nothing new there. "Furthermore, was the excitment of Pariah simply a result of a story/issue that's seldom told through the eyes of a gay black women?"...100%. As I said in a previous post on the Twelve Years page, "...there is a convenience that doesn't and shouldn't really apply to [casting] actors of color because they don't get as many opportunities to shine publicly (I could go on for days talking about how they, BW actress[es], only really shine when they are advancing another groups agenda or [White] female supremacy)." "I admit, the storyline was unique but the story was not, don't you think?" - yup. "Was the acting in Precious equal or superior to that in Shame and/or Pariah?". I would compare Mo'Nique's acting to Fassbender's in their respective movies, both Oscar-worthy (in a perfect world). That's about it.

  • CareyCarey | April 29, 2012 11:09 PM

    Nadine, since you're here, I have another concern with your earlier comment. You said: "Wouldn't Precious be closer to an "Antwone Fisher" or "The Strange thing about the Johnsons" than "Pariah"? I don't recall Oduye's character having to give her MOTHER "head". The actual DEVIL is in the details". Nadine, I don't understand the connection to Antwone Fisher, nor, unless I missed something, did anyone give head in Precious? I also do not understand your reference to the DEVIL. Now, as I said before and you didn't address, was Pariah and Precious both about a young lady finding/discovering herself while dealing with family strife? Was the acting in Precious equal or superior to that in Shame and/or Pariah? Furthermore, was the excitment of Pariah simply a result of a story/issue that's seldom told through the eyes of a gay black women? I admit, the storyline was unique but the story was not, don't you think?

  • Nadine | April 29, 2012 10:38 PM

    "Are you saying that black people should see theirselves in other ethnic groups to under stand humanity?" - KEN... WHERE, pray tell, did you come up with that... Is that what you think I said? Tomfoolery? "Shame expressed explicit sexuality of a white male end of story." - KEN... interesting summary... please explain, if you will... I'm not getting your angle. Would you have preferred a Black male as lead for you to "get it"? I'm not understanding what you're saying...and again... discussing the movie is becoming tiresome.

  • Ken | April 29, 2012 9:55 PM

    @Nadine
    Are you saying that black people should see theirselves in other ethnic groups to under stand humanity? That sounds like some tomfoolery to me. Shame expressed explicit sexuality of a white male end of story. That has already been done before.

  • Nadine | April 29, 2012 11:56 AM

    BTW - I'm starting to tire myself out over SHAME...and the "Twelve Years..." debacle isn't helping. It is unlikely I'll mention SHAME again, so there is my answer for you below. Again, you don't have to watch the movie.

  • Nadine | April 29, 2012 8:12 AM

    @CAREYCAREY - I was just about to go to sleep.. up all night finishing up a project. I'm a little tired, but you know... I don't see how you could really not see the difference between the 2 movies. Wouldn't Precious be closer to an "Antwone Fisher" or "The Strange thing about the Johnsons" than "Pariah"? I don't recall Oduye's character having to give her MOTHER "head". The actual DEVIL is in the details. Man I hate Lee Daniels so much....hate him... so much... I'm not going to force you to watch SHAME. I'm sorry we only know each other through the Internet and that you are not local to me because I would have loved for you to sit and watch the movie with us during one of our screening/pow wow sessions. I expressed to you earlier in a ridiculously hyperbolic way, that I saw SHAME as a Black film, but really I saw it as a film that a White person would struggle to make a la "Remains of the Day", a gorgeous film based on the book by Japanese author, Kazuo Ishiguro. THERE ARE NO EXALTATIONS OF WHITENESS IN SHAME (which only distracts), none...there is only a true expression of HUMANITY which was absolutely beautiful to watch. There was a reality evident in SHAME that you don't get out of Hollywood because, for example, they don't give you the credit to think that a 400 sq-ft one bedroom in the city is glamorous enough for you to enjoy the plot line of a movie. I appreciated the casting specifically of the woman on the train and the blonde in the bar....THEY WERE ACTUALLY PRETTY! Why is that significant? An attraction would be AUTHENTIC and because, as a woman, your "pretty" is your CURRENCY. Hollywood has determined that in order to be a beautiful/pretty woman in the U.S. you must have pale skin, European hair (or be along that spectrum), fit into a certain size dress (curviness not required) and be between the ages of 14 and 45. Pure lies. The power White womanhood wields in Hollywood forces Americans to believe that all these average-looking women are to be desired (currency & power) despite their "short-comings" and you're not despite your strengths as a non-pale person and ummmm... real-life. To place an authentic representation of "prettiness" on-screen juxtaposed by Hollywood's versions of "prettiness", you get reality. ... I'm nauseated and super-tired and can barely continue, but a couple of other things to note 1) the main character's (Brandon's) change in demeanor, tone/voice when dealing with family as opposed to his outside world, 2) again, the realism of the expression of NYC in the film, 3) starkness versus glamor, 4) choices McQueen made in filming and voyeurism; as the audience, one could forget you were watching a movie because you felt like a fly on the wall at times due to McQueen's holding of shots and sparse cutting. I'm sure I'm missing other things, I could talk about how the feeling of "shame" from Brandon, but also from those who interacted with Brandon (outside of his underground world) permeated the film quite successfully without the audience having to feel uncomfortable...yes, I could go on... but I can't... too tired and I have to get a couple of hours before I start my day. I hope this made sense as I am delirious.

  • CareyCarey | April 29, 2012 7:01 AM

    **WAVING OVER HERE** I can't hear y'all... Nadine & Miles? Miles Maker was connected to the film Pariah? And what exactly am I missing by refusing to find pleasure in watching white folks naked asses as they do the humptydump... you know, that shame thang? Also, how exactly does Pariah and Precious differ? All I know is one made millions while the other remains lanquished in obsurity. Things that make me go huuumm and I still can't hear you.

  • CareyCarey | April 27, 2012 4:01 PM

    Okay Nadine, I'll wait for the return of you and Miles. But before you go... you know I can't let you get away with misrepresenting MY stance on "BLACK FILMS". Granted, you have your vision and understanding of what constitutes a "BLACK FILM"... HOWEVER I, nor you, wrote the play book. I am simply suggesting that when one... up in here... in Shadow and act... says the word "BLACK FILM" er'body knows what that means. So, regardless of how you expertly expalined your position and showed your love of Steve McQueen, Shame IS NOT a black film. And listen, stop it *LOL*. I don't have to see Shame to discuss it's less than finer points. I've seen Pariah and I know naked white asses wasn't running across my screen. In fact, no nudity was shown in Pariah. The same cannot be said for Shame's less than noteworthy freaky deaky. More importantly, there was a real honest and true story weaved throughout Pariah. The pitch for Shame was that it was suppose to be about sex addiction and the lesson we can learn by viewing it. Yeah... right.... I don't have to "SEE" shame to know that pitch was a bunch of BS, I know what constitutes an addiction. So Nadine, when you come back, the DEFINITIVE answers I am looking for is 1) What's to be gained by watching Shame? 2) How did the storyline in Pariah really differ from that in Precious? Were they not both about a young lady finding/discovering herself while dealing with family strife? 3) Was the acting in Precious equal or superior than that in Shame and/or Pariah? 4) Was the excitment of Pariah simply a result of a story/issue that's seldom told through the eyes of a gay black women? I admit, the storyline was unique but the story was not. Nadine, lets start with those 5 points... you have the floor :-)

  • Nadine | April 27, 2012 3:26 PM

    @CC - ...have to go into this meeting, but CC... come now... what DEFINITIVE statement are you getting from my comment below, my dear? ;) You must know me better than that! ...and this thing, man, about discussing MY movie, "SHAME", without the other party having not seen it.... I cannot be a party to... I CAN'T do it and you know I would LOVE to discuss with you, hence my proposition last week, but you know... having watched it, oh,... 800 times now (admittedly, I know when to turn my head), I do honor that you know what you like, and this movie wouldn't be your "cup of tea"... I have to honor that as I knew, before I even saw the movie in the theaters that I would love it and it would reinvigorate my hope in the future of filmmaking. Although I WHOLLY disagree with your stance on "BLACK FILMS". I couldn't watch the movie after the first 500 times, and could think of nothing else but how it WAS a Black Film, or something I would expect from a Black filmmaker (reality... not fantasy)... Steve McQueen's position on HUMANITY and la raza, as a Black man/Black Briton, had to do with the perfection of the film, for me, in that it is CLEAR, that SM doesn't believe in his or the supremacy of the supposedly dominant group. He see's himself in other people... ALL PEOPLE. It would take too long to get into, but I do think Steve McQueen's basic understanding of humanity is something VERY much lacking in Black movie making here in the U.S. There is this sense that, as a writer, you're writing from the point of view of "THIS" type of person, this MAN or this WOMAN, and all of your lack of understanding of who that person really is goes into that script making the script pedantic and useless and TYPHOID MARY ON THE LOOSE (diseased) as opposed to writing from your point of view IF YOU WERE IN THE POSITION OF THE PERSON FOR WHOM YOU ARE WRITING (the same for acting). That's called respecting, honoring and loving your neighbor, believing in the rights of all people, not just your own, truly understand the meaning of equality... see Red Tails and it's failures... I hope this made sense I have to run... So much more I would want to say. I'll write you about the Precious "thing" elsewhere.

  • Nadine | April 27, 2012 2:57 PM

    @MM - I meant everything I said about KW. I could go on for days... She's got "it" and "it" radiates from behind her eyes and her spirit. ...for days... I could go on for days... I personally compare her to the eighties crew of comedians. Like an early Robin Williams as serious actor... with more serious opportunities... I don't know... she could tear it up and then run the talk show circuit and be as effervescent and magnetic as she is in real life... that's a great combo in this business. She's very lucky.

  • CareyCarey | April 27, 2012 2:55 PM

    @ Miles, we must have been posting at the same time. Now, since you enjoyed the conversation, I invite you to join in. I know this post is about the remake of "Uptown" but we've beat that subject to DEATH and I am sure that party is not over... it will return. More importantly, although many view conversations that may "seem" off topic as hijacking a post, I view comment sections as a place much like the lines of moviegoers at film festivals. A conversation ensues on the film being shown, and then it moves to other events and/or movies on the program. Sooooo, and anyway, I have concerns about Kim Wayans acting in Pariah. Also, I have questions about all the actors in that film. Also, if you will, please tell me what you enjoyed the most about Pariah, and how it differed from Precious?

  • CareyCarey | April 27, 2012 2:35 PM

    Yep, your post on Pariah's amazon page is were my question can be found. But now, you know my motto is "What About A Time Called Now". So here we are, you championing Kim Wayan's performance in Pariah while poo-pooing Precious. Now, can I say it.. OMG! That's exactly were my thought were. I have no idea how some would champion Pariah over Precious... not to mention my concerns with Kim Wayans performance. Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed Pariah (somewhat, for what it was), but it pales in comparison to Precious. Listen, I've been trying to find out exactly why some love love love Pariah, and I've yet to understand their enthusiasm. Granted, I've found reviews written in reviewer ambiguous writer's talk, but I need the real thang. For instance check this--> "not only is "Pariah" nothing like "Precious", it is so much better and so much more rewarding than anything Lee Daniels "achieved" with his hysterical, exploitative, ghetto soap opera porno. Real in ways few movies ever are, "Pariah" mixes the coming out and coming-of-age story and pitches it against the backdrop of an African-American family adapting to the shifting cultural sexual tides. The result is a film that is warm and raw" ~ by Kevin Jagernauth. Yeah right Kevin, s'plain that to me like I am a 9 year old, cuz you're leaving out the good part. So Nadine, we really need to talk. Btw, good catch, I was trying to bait you into discussing the sexual content in Pariah, verses that of Shame. And I KNOW you don't want to go there :-)

  • Miles Maker | April 27, 2012 2:26 PM

    Nadine and CAREYCAREY -- Thanks so much for supporting PARIAH by watching it and talking about it. I enjoyed reading the Kim Wayans comments.

  • Nadine | April 27, 2012 1:47 PM

    Really? I don't think I can recall your ever asking me about "Pariah". I was just teasing about your watching Pariah BEFORE watching what I wanted you to watch (I'm not comparing the two movies at all). I bought PARIAH the day it came out, per usual, while walking down the street (gotta love amazon). I think I even placed a link on S&A's post directing people to PARIAH's amazon page. I snatch these movies up like candy the second they come out on VOD to add to the library and to support if possible (this Ozwald Boateng this is killing me...V.O.D. in the U.S. please). Were you thinking of someone else, because I've never (or maybe I didn't see your post) been asked my thoughts on Pariah. I'll tell you this.... I'm in love with Kim Wayans and she, who has gotten SOME recognition, deserves more. This woman's acting is soooo from the heart - she has such a beautiful demeanor and spirit AND YOU REALLY FEEL WHAT SHE AS AN ACTRESS IS TRYING TO CONVEY...which only reinforces my beliefs that comedians are the best actors. If you can do comedy, you have an understanding of the human spirit that most can't touch. Though I rightfully HATED "PRECIOUS", I knew Mo'Nique would throw it down.... I had no doubts. The same here with KIM. She was so wonderful. It is what is behind her eyes that really connects with people, I think.... Beautiful, just beautiful...

  • CareyCarey | April 27, 2012 1:18 PM

    **Looking @ Nadine with squinting eyes** Well Nadine, show me yours and I'll show you mine. I mean, for one, I have not dismissed your offer... it's still in the "to be considered" stage. However, you oughta know why I watched Pariah? First, I do BLACK films... nuff said. Now, I've been trying to get you to drop your thoughts on Pariah, and then, after you do or if you do, I believe many answers/concerns will come to the light. Btw, why are you comparing Pariah to Shame?

  • Nadine | April 27, 2012 11:23 AM

    ... gotcha. @CAREYCAREY - You're not going to be watching Pariah and NOT take me up on my offer, which expired Tuesday by the way.

  • CareyCarey | April 27, 2012 1:33 AM

    Dang it Misha, I am sooooo mad. I wanted to disagree with you so badly (cuz I like it like that) but we're in agreement on this one. But Misha, if I can take a moment to hijack this post, I need someone's opinion on Pariah. I mean, I just watched it (Tuesday)and I know you don't mind giving your opinion. Listen, my memory is slip slip slipping away so I can't quite remember what everyone was waving about Precious's step-child. So seeing that your mother is letting you stay up late tonight, tell me what's good. :-)

  • writer | April 27, 2012 12:54 AMReply

    Trust, both of these men are powerful enough to hire a black writer. I guess there are NO black writers with the comedic genius of This Means War.

    Between this, The Help, and Think Like A Man, it's clear black feature writers need to focus on TV.

  • james evans from the c-b pj's | April 27, 2012 12:11 AMReply

    The potential lack of top quality black folks involved behind the camera is EXACTLY why I will (potentially) not be supporting this (until it comes out on video.) Come ON, Will. Work with a Negro Director FOR ONCE IN YOUR CAREER. JUST ONCE IS ALL I ASK. Damn, even Denzel has worked with Fuqua (and got himself an oscar because of it). Even Dr. Cosby himself would recommend hiring black folks for this project.

  • ispeakforthehughes | April 27, 2012 2:09 PM

    add the hughes brothers (book of eli directors) and antwone fisher (screenwriter of his directorial debut) to the mix. denzel is pretty good at working with his folks actually.

  • Donella | April 27, 2012 12:31 PM

    For Denzel adding Carl Franklin and Spike Lee.

  • urbanauteur | April 26, 2012 9:52 PMReply

    Both of `em are closet Neo-Conservatives.

  • ade | April 26, 2012 8:57 PMReply

    Agree with you wholeheartedly on the writing and directing aspect of the project. Give our creative people a shot .

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