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10 Fascinating Statistics You Should Know As The New TV Season Gets Underway

Television
by Tambay A. Obenson
October 8, 2012 6:41 PM
3 Comments
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From a well-researched, very useful FutonCritic.com report which they're calling The 10 Things You Need to Know About the New Season.

That is, the new TV season.

We already mentioned the first one a couple of weeks ago, which was that only 32% of new broadcast network shows make it to a second season - a figure I thought would actually be higher.

But the hard data tells the story of that first thing, as well as the other 9 on their list, which the revealed, one-at-a-time, over a period of about 2 weeks. 

And out of courtesy to them, and the work that they did, I'll list the 10 items here, but to read the insightful breakdowns of each of the 10 items, you'll have to head over to Futon Critic for that. 

Here's the list of 10, along with my own quick reactions to each:

1) Only 32% of broadcast network shows make it to a second season - as already said, I thought that figure would be higher. But it obviously means that the majority of the new shows you'll be watching this season, won't be back, so don't get too attached to them until you're sure.

2) Shows that premiere in September have the best chance of survival - hmm... interesting; I suppose it could be because they'll have more time to grow on audiences, who are ready and primed to begin the new TV season in September, and by the time shows debut in the mid-season, audiences may have already become attached to those shows that debuted in September, and may not be as interested in discovering anything new.

3) Scripted and unscripted shows fail at the same rate - Ok. Nothing to add here. Although maybe I'd would've liked to read that unscripted show fail more often than scripted.

4) Friday night is indeed the "death slot" - Make sense; it's Friday night. Last day of the work week; happy hour(s); people go out, and stay out, and unwind, as opposed to any other day of the work week. So any new shows that are programmed for Friday nights are most likely sent there to die.

5) 10 o'clock is just as successful as any other time period - In essence, it's not *late* hour, and cable TV doesn't suddenly draw audiences away.

6) 5% of shows that are announced don't even air - I'm surprised it's not higher actually.

7) 4% of broadcast series have changed networks - Hmm... interesting. I've never really given much thought to what that percentage might be... until now.

8) New shows on average lose 14% of their audience by episode two - I can see that.

9) Cable dramas are almost twice as likely to return as broadcast ones - No surprise there either, with all the talk of much of the best TV being on cable, and recently, that cable TV shows are more attractive than films released in the theater.

10) History is on the side of the majority of this fall's new shows - Here's where I say goodbye, and send you over to the Futon Critic website for the rest of the story.

Click HERE to go there.

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3 Comments

  • Dankwa Brooks | October 9, 2012 2:40 PMReply

    Thanks for the info Tambay. I loved breakdowns like this since before I had to study them in college. LOL.

    Anyway, as far as #9 I've noticed that cable shows get larger episode orders and or whip fire renewals. By the airing of the second episode the cable network is announcing renewal for another season. And if it's a already successful show like 'Dexter' it will a two season renewal. Maybe it's the absence of feeling pressure to sell ads, but cable seem to be a better bet for your show to have a chance to gain traction. Frankly I wasn't that interested in 'Boardwalk Empire' (Season 1) until about the 5th episode. Then I was hooked.

  • ALM | October 8, 2012 7:41 PMReply

    Wow. I'm surprised to see "The Mindy Project" as being quoted with having a 0% possibility of renewal.

  • Akimbo | October 8, 2012 8:22 PM

    Yeah, but that analysis is based on the historical performance of shows in that genre and timeslot and on that network; it has nothing to to with Mindy as a show. Any Fox half hour placed on the same day/time would have the same prediction.

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