"Autistic Like Me" Documentary From A Black Father's Perspective

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by Sergio
December 14, 2011 10:47 AM
3 Comments
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Here's a look at a new documentary film film about autism told from a black father's perspective, something that, at least to my knowledge, has never been done before. The film is Autistic Like Me made by filmmaker Charles Jones which tells his story and of five other fathers coming to grips and understanding their children's autism disorder. Needless to say this is a worthwhile and valuable film.

As Jones says: "There are many men walking around silently suffering as I once did. The film and this movement gives a voice to those men. Our children need this voice."

Below in a trailer for the film and a short video of Jones discussing why he made the film:

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3 Comments

  • artbizzy | December 17, 2011 10:10 AMReply

    I'm so glad he made this. And I truly love the title. Looks like a powerful film. To witness a black father's perspective on such a painful topic is right on time. I love the still image above of him embracing his son who is dressed like him. I gotta see this. I hope many people do.

  • Adriane Haye | December 14, 2011 11:49 AMReply

    As a mother, African American and more importantly a human-this trailer touched me deeply. The silence that men so often go through as father's because our society says it's not manly to express your pain is prevelant and damaging. It is damaging to the parent and child. A child mirrors their first understanding of expression from their parents and if that is void, where will it be learned? To see an African American male narrate and direct this film is a powerful statement because it goes against the stereo type that men of color are absentee parents with no heart.

    BRAVO Charles Jones!

  • Adriane Haye | December 14, 2011 11:48 AMReply

    As a mother, African American and more importantly a human-this trailer touched me deeply. The silence that men so often go through as father's because our society says it's not manly to express your pain is prevelant and damaging. It is damaging to the parent and child. A child mirrors their first understanding of expression from their parents and if that is void, where will it be learned? To see an African American male narrate and direct this film is a powerful statement because it goes against the stereo type that men of color are absentee parents with no heart.

    BRAVO Charles Jones!

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