Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

Shadow and Act

Wrapping Up The 19th Annual African Diaspora International Film Festival (ADIFF)

  • By Aundre Burke
  • |
  • December 27, 2011 1:18 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
Sunday, December 11th marked the closing ceremony for the 2012 19th Annual African Diaspora International Film Festival (ADIFF).

L.A. Rebellion 2011 Retrospective Review - Jamaa Fanaka's "Emma Mae" + Interview w/ Star Jerri Hayes

  • By Brandon Wilson
  • |
  • December 20, 2011 12:25 PM
  • |
  • 18 Comments
When I asked Jerri Hayes how it felt to revisit her star turn in Jamaa Fanaka’s second feature Emma Mae (1976) after a recent screening, she answered without hesitation. “You know, it’s so different; I was sitting there relating to Emma Mae like it wasn’t me” she replied.

Post-Blackness: Every Movement Needs a Manifesto

  • By Andre Seewood
  • |
  • December 19, 2011 1:26 PM
  • |
  • 8 Comments
More: Reviews, oped

L.A. Rebellion 2011 Retrospective Review - Larry Clark's "Passing Through"

  • By Brandon Wilson
  • |
  • December 12, 2011 9:50 PM
  • |
  • 2 Comments
There are two filmmakers named Larry Clark, and this is NOT about the Larry Clark whose ephebophiliac imagination has given us films like Kids, Bully, and Wassup Rockers! Just so we’re clear, this Larry Clark is Black, a Cleveland native who went to UCLA along with Charles Burnett, Julie Dash, Haile Gerima and Billy Woodberry and was a key member of the L.A. Rebellion movement.
More: Reviews

L.A. Rebellion 2011 Retrospective Review - Charles Burnett's Other Masterpiece "To Sleep With Anger"

  • By Brandon Wilson
  • |
  • December 8, 2011 4:36 PM
  • |
  • 9 Comments
To Sleep With Anger was released with a small bit of fanfare in 1990. Charles Burnett had already acquired a reputation as one of our most important homegrown auteurs even if most of the audience, black and white alike, were unfamiliar with his work.
More: Reviews

African Diaspora International Film Fest 2012 - Review Of Psychodrama "David is Dying"

  • By Jasmin
  • |
  • December 7, 2011 12:29 PM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
When I think of a character being diagnosed with a terminal illness in a movie, especially HIV/AIDS, I think of sorrow. I expect to see the illness take center stage, to spend the rest of the film rooting for the victim to overcome whatever physical and personal obstacles lie ahead, and to weep when he or she finally passes (think Philadelphia, And the Band Played On, Rent, even Precious). Maybe it’s because HIV/AIDS has become such an epidemic within the black community, or because of the way it’s typically portrayed on film. But when I recently attended the NYADIFF screening of David is Dying, the second feature film by UK director Stephen Lloyd Jackson, it quickly became clear that this wasn’t going to be a typical HIV-themed film, and that David was definitely not a typical patient.

African Diaspora Film Fest Review - "The Story Of Lovers Rock" Educates And Inspires

  • By Tambay A. Obenson
  • |
  • December 6, 2011 10:25 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments
I'll be posting some quickie reviews of films screening at the ongoing African Diaspora Film Festival here in New York City... starting with Menelik Shabazz's The Story Of Lovers Rock, which opened the festival, but is also currently on a 1-week run at Quad Cinemas in lower Manhattan, though I believe this is its last week, so see it if/while you can. You may not get another opportunity for sometime.

"A Different Image": Alile Sharon Larkin Retrospective (L.A. Rebellion Film Series)

  • By Nijla Mumin
  • |
  • December 5, 2011 6:10 AM
  • |
  • 5 Comments
In Alile Sharon Larkin’s 1982 film A Different Image, main character Alana, played by Margot Saxton-Federella says to her male friend Vincent as she motions to her breasts and butt: “All they see is this and this. The rest is invisible.”
More: Reviews

Review - Steve McQueen's "Shame" (Smack It up, Flip It, Rub It Down, Oh, No...!)

  • By Tambay A. Obenson
  • |
  • December 2, 2011 9:59 AM
  • |
  • 9 Comments
It opens in the US today, so I figured I'd repost my review of it, which I penned after I saw it in early October.

"Sankofa" Revisited (L.A. Rebellion Film Series)

  • By Nijla Mumin
  • |
  • November 21, 2011 6:47 AM
  • |
  • 13 Comments
Sankofa is an Akan word meaning roughly, “We must go back and reclaim our past in order to move forward.” Haile Gerima’s cinematic rendering of this is perhaps one of his greatest filmmaking achievements. Screened this weekend as part of the UCLA L.A. Rebellion Film Series at the Hammer Museum, the film follows Shola, a black model who is transported back to a West Indian plantation after participating in a fashion shoot on shores of the slave castles in Ghana. Shola becomes a house slave alongside Shango, a militant Maroon fieldhand and love interest who resists her early warnings to ignore the brutalities committed against others on the plantation. Sexually abused by the plantation’s owner, Shola is drawn to Nunu, an African-born fieldhand and Maroon leader, who ignites her eventual rebellion.
More: Reviews