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Chiwetel Ejiofor & Steve McQueen Will Explore "12 Years A Slave" With Brad Pitt Producing

by Tambay A. Obenson
August 16, 2011 6:38 AM
35 Comments
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Breaking from Variety:

“Shame” director Steve McQueen is set to direct Chiwetel Ejiofor in “12 Years a Slave,” which Brad Pitt’s Plan B shingle is producing. Pic tells the true story of Solomon Northrup, a New York citizen who’s kidnapped in Washington in 1841 and rescued from a cotton plantation in Louisiana in 1853.

So, whoa! I know what you're thinking before you even say it... another historical narrative on black suffering; this one set during slavery. And you'd be right!

The book gives harrowing descriptions of Northrup's years in captivity, leading up to his freedom, as the title suggests.

It's certainly not the blaxploitation-inspired Django Unchained; this is actually based on a real story, written by the man himself, Solomon Northrup, which the script will be based on; and he does win in the end, using brains not brawn, at one point having to defend himself in court when he is counter-sued by the slave traders he sues in the first place for kidnapping him into slavery, though he was born free.

And with McQueen's minimalist style, I can only wonder how he'll adapt this particular story for the screen; but I'm definitely curious.

So what about the Fela biopic that Chiwetel and McQueen were working on together, which was announced a year or 2 ago? I wonder if that's still in their respective futures. Last we reported, a new writer had been hired to re-write the script, but I haven't heard much since.

No word though on when 12 Years A Slave will go into production, or when we can expect its release. Interesting Brad Pitt's interest. I wonder who initiated the project, McQueen? Pitt? Ejiofor? And can we go ahead and pencil in Chiwetel for an Oscar nomination whenever this is released?

I should note that Ejiofor is already attached to play a freed slave in a film loosely based on a book by John Eugene Cay, Jr., titled, Ducks, Dogs and Friends, set during post-Civil War, Jim Crow-era days, and which tells the story of Christmas Moultrie (the last slave born on the historical Mulberry Grove Plantation, where the Cotton Gin was invented), who hunted on the Savannah River, together with Ward Allen (to be played by James Caviezel).

Have your say...

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35 Comments

  • Brent | August 19, 2012 4:25 AMReply

    phenomenally written book considering African-American's circumstances at that time. The book digs deep into the cruel brutality the plantation slave endured at the hands of his/her master. I would like to see McQueen focus on that aspect of the story. This will open up more possibilities, and allow for Fassbender to really get his hands dirty and take his role to the next level past your typical "slave movie" May also give something for Ejiofor something to feed off of as well. Very excited for this potential mega-hit!

  • Jug | August 18, 2011 11:22 AMReply

    LOL Aww shit don't get all crazy. Real talk, they ARE kickin' our butts as far as scoring. Everytime I turn around, somebody I love their work is actually British (Clarke Peters on THE WIRE comes to mind). But since I look at these agencies and see their client rosters and see how sooo many of them are filled with foreign actors who can pass for white American, I wonder "Are they reeeally that good? Or is it good business to import an unknown quantity, make them a star & then export them to the world?" Always about that International Dollar ya know...

    I love Simon Baker on THE MENTALIST, but that dude doesn't even TRY to keep his accent anymore. Neither does Archie Punjabi on THE GOOD WIFE. If we (Americans) did that they'd say "Aww hell no. Those American actors are so poor at their craft". LOL

  • CareyCarey | August 18, 2011 11:14 AMReply

    Oh sh*t, I think you've trumped me Jug. Yep, after reading the following quote, I've been left with my mouth hanging open. I have no more ammunition. Damn, when a guy says he has been their and done that, what the hell can I say.... NOTHIN" :-)

    **my hands are in the air and my guns are on the ground.

    You said: Carey, the reason I don’t believe it is I’ve SEEN British actors up close, on the stage and in person. Not everyone is banging. I’ve MET British actors who think we are better actors, in the sense of actually “being” not using technique. When I was there I saw shows on the West End & at the RSC & went “What the fuck was that mess?!”

    Damn Jug, I'm not worthy. I bow at your feet.

  • Jug | August 18, 2011 10:25 AMReply

    @Carey-

    http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/archives/watch_sam_worthington_tries_on_a_texan_accent_in_texas_killing_fields_trail/ (notice how it's Jeffrey Dean Morgan in a majority of the shots but the movie is about Sam's character?)

    http://thefilmstage.com/trailer/main-st-trailer-featuring-colin-firth-and-orlando-bloom/ 'Nuff said LMBAO

  • Jug | August 18, 2011 9:48 AMReply

    LMBAO All that mess, just to try and convince me of something I don't believe. Carey, the reason I don't believe it is I've SEEN British actors up close, on the stage and in person. Not everyone is banging. I've MET British actors who think we are better actors, in the sense of actually "being" not using technique. When I was there I saw shows on the West End & at the RSC & went "What the fuck was that mess?!"

    I've also met those, like you, who believe that actors who are British are just simply amazing "just because" LOL

    For real tho, I think my view is shaped by having seen these actors in their natural habitat and even seeing them do American works, cringing & having "my bubble burst". I've also been absolutely spellbound by their work-same as Americans. I think we have a romantic notion that British acting is flat out better because of their diction or their facility with language (mainly having to master an American accent if you want to work in Hollywood). And everyone ain't killing it (yeah I'm lookin' at Orlando Bloom, Idris (go watch THE LOSERS and get a GOOD laugh), Michael Fassbender). I'm also talking about stage as well, not just film. Many amazing American actors are, sorry to say, a little "facially challenged" to be in front of the camera, so they're on the boards :-O

    I mean, if this were a real argument about "who is best" we reeeally should include Australians, because many of the actors we reactively take as British are Australian/New Zealand. Cliff Curtis, Sam Worthington, Guy Pierce, Rose Byrne, I could go on. If you saturate the market with Australians & Brits-while being good-it is a fallacy of reason to say that Brits are "better" than Americans, when it is simply that there are more OF them in films. You could make the argument that they're there BECAUSE they're better, but that sort of 2+2=4 logic ain't necessarily how Entertainment works, now is it?

    You know you my man tho Carey, but we will NEVAH agree on this one LOL :-D

  • CareyCarey | August 18, 2011 7:47 AMReply

    Orville, I’m tryin’ to work with you man, but if you don’t stop slobbering and put out your flame, every time a black man hits the door, I don’t know what I’m going to do with you. *LOL*

    Now, my good ol’ HBCU graduate friend, Jug. You sho is a smart fella, but I see you still don’t believe fat meat is greasy. LMBAO

    Listen son, I see I’m gonna have to put you on my knee and tell you a little story. Yeah.... I know, I heard what you didn’t write. You know, about Laurence Olivier & Marilyn Monroe & Method Acting & Method Man & how you don’t get along with AT ALL, but slow down my young genius, lets go back to something we both can relate to.

    Listen, there was an American animated television series featuring Tooter Turtle and The Wizard. Mr. Wizard lived in a tiny cardboard box at the base of a tall tree (something like S & A). Tooter would knock on the cardboard box, to ask another favor. From inside the box, Mr. Wizard would shrink Tooter (Jug) small enough to enter through the box's front door, and eagerly invite him in. Mr. Wizard (Carey)has the magic to change Tooter's life to some other destiny, usually sending him back in time and to various locales. Since none of Tooter's alternate lives ever worked out, the moral of each segment was always the same: "Be satisfied with your lot."

    When Tooter's trip finally became a catastrophe, he always called out the same thing, "Help me, Mr. Wizard!" Mr. Wizard would rescue him with the incantation, "Drizzle, drazzle, druzzle, drome; time for zis one to come home." Then, Mr. Wizard would always give Tooter the same advice: "Be just vhat you is, not vhat you is not. Folks vhat do zis are ze happiest lot." Tooter never learned, though.

    Now Tooter... I mean Jug, listen, be what you is and not what you is not, cut to the chase and just spit it out. It’s simple... just say, “Carey, my brother from the same struggle, I am so wrong for trying to clean up my spilled milk with another post that has dragged you back in the hi-jack post zone. I should have known better than try to Bamboozle an old school playah like you. Yeah, I said it, I said British actors are better trained, and thus better actors than their American counterparts”

    "Drizzle, drizzle, druzzle, drome; time for zis one to come home" *L-Big Time- OL*

  • Orville | August 18, 2011 6:55 AMReply

    Chiwetel Ejiofor is gorgeous too bad he's straight! Wow this guy is definitely going to become a leading man he's a good actor and he's cute!

  • Jug | August 18, 2011 4:56 AMReply

    LMBAO Oh no Carey!

    See what I didn't write is that while many American institutions may not spend their time on Classical training, they spend a WHOLE helluva lot of time on American Classics and American styles of acting, which tend to be more muscular, emotive & messy (in a good way). It has it's place, because in that respect British actors mimic our shit all day, especially for film-bcuz most want to work in the medium. There's many interviews & stories about THE PRINCE & THE SHOWGIRL, where Laurence Olivier hated Marilyn Monroe but had to admit that she blew him off the screen because of her Method Acting. Now, me & Method don't get along AT ALL, but that sort of messy, naturalistic style of Acting is an American innovation & plays extremely well for film. Sucks for the stage where you have to be able to hear the words to get intention & emotion as well as clear physical movements that may get muddied in "natural" acting. The camera, being close up, caters to it-the muddied movement & sound become clear thanks to tight shots & microphones. All that has since changed and the "styles" have sort of mixed together and become a "whatever works" but know that both ways of skinning the cat work.

  • CareyCarey | August 17, 2011 8:57 AMReply

    "Hmm I’m noticing that all the comments have been positive. "Where are the “I don’t wanna see that slave shit no more!!” rants?"

    Well Jug, I didn't know how to address this post but your question opened the door. But wait, if a person shows me who they are, I will believe them.

    Now, I've been waiting for some of the people (the rant and "I don’t wanna see that slave shit" crowd (at least one of them) to drop by and say a thing or two, but I think they've bben burnt by "The Help". See, by blasting on The Help (before they even saw the movie) they've learned when to fold'em and when to hold 'em.

    Here's my point... I just saw The Help, and well.... moving polictics out of the way... it was a good movie. Some of the white characters (most of them) were caricatures, however, Viola Davis (it could be Oscar time) killed her part, and the story held me. In fact, all the black actors did a great job.


    @ Darkan my friend, I think Accidentalvistor is holding the best hand... on this one. His argument on the slave trade and the birth place of an actor (Brit or American) is a point that cannot be denied. .

  • CareyCarey | August 17, 2011 7:53 AMReply

    **bout done jackin:**

    Tamara, I just want to say that you exhibited a quality that's rarely seen. It's not often a person comes back and admits the errors/"skews" of their ways (whatever they may be).

    My hat is tipped in your direction!

    You're gonna make a fine wife and a trustworthy friend... especially if you can cook too. :-)

  • Hijinks & Highjacking | August 17, 2011 7:25 AMReply

    @ CareyCarey,

    Thank you for responding. If I pull back and reconsider I can see my view skews fully appreciating the film...as film, because I'm still thinking in terms of the book's flow, pace...at least in the beginning. Honestly it took me a second to get used to Viola's narration. And the mention of her son came earlier in the book, I think, or it came in bits and pieces over and throughout whereas in the movie it came out of nowhere, was jutted in and didn't fully meld for me until that close-to-the-end mention in V's kitchen with Minnie and Skeeter. And the scene the night of the riots was pivotal and probably one of the most powerful...at least for me during the entire bit. I'll concede and shut up about who's deserving of Oscar or no. I'm just a fan....who read the book....and more fiercely loved the book than the movie. And that's major blockage for me, I think; the discrepancies and change-up that I purposely went-in searching for. *sigh* So yeah, I'll hush and let you and Jug carry-on.

    Just realized, I co-hijacked another thread. Carey we've got to STOP THIS! lol :-)

    -Tamara

  • Jug | August 17, 2011 6:36 AMReply

    @Carey-HAHAHAHA

    Neverrrrrrrrr!

    But I'm seeing it soon, so I'll let you know what I thought. Expecting big things-Viola is a beast day in/day out.

  • CareyCarey | August 17, 2011 6:19 AMReply

    "And no Carey, I’m not proving your argument that British actors are better LOL"

    Now c'mon man, you can't have your cake and eat it too... LMAO! It's okay to agree with ol' CareyCarey. :-) some folks might still love you in the morning. So spit it out b/c you've already said it... black british actors are better (across the board) then their American counterparts.

    But check this, your little tangential - as you called it - was right-on-right-on. Aside from it being on point, it's showed the man behind the smooth non-threatening, non-confrontational prose... if you know what I mean. You have this way of disagreeing with the opinions or position of another without offending them or causing unnecessary confrontation. I lack that skill.

    And I feel you on the what's - and whys - and how come's - in respect to the vents, rags, heat debates on movies that depict the black race in what some would define as " a negative light" .

    "I will watch almost any sort of subject matter as long as it’s done well technically-engaging/interesting story, good direction, brilliant acting..and that can go for WAR & PEACE just as much as PLAYER’S CLUB, depends on what they set out to do. But THE HELP looks to be a great movie, regardless of subject matter, & so does 12 YEARS A SLAVE"

    ________________

    YELP and YELP

    Now I want someone to give their opinion on Viola Davis's performance.

  • Jug | August 17, 2011 5:42 AMReply

    @Carey-

    "Not only did she excellently project the required emotions of each scene, those emotions were subtle (in many cases) yet varied, yet strong, all at the same time. Any C- actor can emote, however, the crème de la crème actor shows emotions without exaggeration, while nevertheless giving us all the secondary emotions that comes with them. lets say tears."

    "I am suggesting the Viola’s performance projected emotions - many times - without tears and - sometime - without words. On top of that, it was an array/vast variety of emotions, not just those associated with pain, that really caught my eye"

    You nailed it bruh.

  • Jug | August 17, 2011 5:40 AMReply

    @Tamara & Carey-And therein lies my big issue. I will watch almost any sort of subject matter as long as it's done well technically-engaging/interesting story, good direction, brilliant acting..and that can go for WAR & PEACE just as much as PLAYER'S CLUB, depends on what they set out to do.

    But I think when it comes to race, some folks can't get past subject matter & see the quality of a piece. And that handicaps our ability to tell ANY kind of story because it limits your spectrum of creativity. I can imagine myself as a psychopathic killer just as much as I can President of the United States. Same should be for the types of stories that A) ARE told & B) GET told.

    Yes, I agree, there need to be more stories with complex black characters other than Jim Crow, antebellum south, etc etc. But check it, if you do a period piece about AMERICA of the last 200 years (or much of the Western Hemisphere for that matter), then that's what you're gonna get. Weren't too many Rosewoods or Harlem Renaissance's going around...we are a YOUNG country & especially young (& immature) when it comes to race in our country & it's history. So, with that being said, unless you want to make a piece of total revisionist history a la INGLORIOUS, a period piece about America is going to deal with Black people often being in subservient, second banana roles. It's just a fact of the times.

    Now, with all that being said, there are a GREAT many movies being made that blow history to hell, whether period or not regardless of genre, so for me why is it that even in those situations you STILL have a lack of black characters (yeah I'm looking at you Romance & Sci-Fi!!) It's then that my ire comes up because those stories often have NO basis in historical fact. And even if they did, why must the focal point be one of race? It's like your favorite police procedural that every season has to have the obligatory "rap episode" and that is when they have the most black actors on screen, at one time, thus meeting their quota. It's just another excuse to have/not have actors of color, at least to me.

    But THE HELP looks to be a great movie, regardless of subject matter, & so does 12 YEARS A SLAVE, I don't see why there is such venom about the subject matter. What, folks don't think there are going to be white people in 12 YEARS A SLAVE with Chiwetel & Steve? Come on...IT'S ABOUT SLAVERY FOR CHRIST'S SAKE?! LMBAO

  • Jug | August 17, 2011 5:39 AMReply

    And for the Black American/Brit argument, I think there definitely is a "I don't want to be seen that way" thing going on that many Black British actors don't wrestle with, at least in an American way (from what I'm told, they have their own race/identity issues over there). Subconsciously, I think for many Black folks, there's been a programming of "WE were wrong" when we see images of slavery. I know I know, there's pain of it, the horror, the sheer inhumanity of it but it is a part of our history & it just seems that when people talk about slavery & depictions of it-the lack of education, the horrid living conditions, the murder, genocide & mutilation of blacks en masse-it seems as if we regard it with a bit of culpability (and I'm not talking about that "some blacks sold other blacks into slavery shit" either) and don't want to deal. Like a rape victim. Fuck that. I didn't do that shit, YOU did. Jews don't do that. You see SCHINDLER'S LIST, BOY IN THE STRIPED PAJAMAS, LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL, etc it's always the Germans. I don't know, it's just the feeling I get or it might be me. Sorry little tangential there :-P

    Anyway...back on message...

    In America, we don't teach classical training as rigorously as they do (they practically invented the shit, incidentally in musicals it's the reverse) so there are many more opportunities to have been exposed to other forms of performance before someone says "Be thug #2". In American training institutions, many places briskly touch on classical training because whether it's stage or not & unless it's your passion, you won't do much of that work unless you hit the various Shakespeare festivals around the country. And you almost certainly won't be asked to do it in film/tv because, let's face it, nobody is LOL.

    And no Carey, I'm not proving your argument that British actors are better LOL Just saying their training is different, like Krav Maga training is different than Jeet Kune Do. End of the day, both will kill your ass flat LOL

  • CareyCarey | August 17, 2011 5:11 AMReply

    "@ Carey, Oscar-time for V’s role in “The Help?” Hmm. Is there a particular scene? What about Octavia’s portion? Any scene with her worthy of little ‘O? Just curious"


    Good question Tamara, and because of our past exchanges, I took your question as pure curiousity... no worry.

    Okay, first, when I assess an actors performance, it has little to do with one scene, it can’t. I look at how the actor captures all the subtle nuances of the role that makes me believe that character, and not see that the actor is acting. In that regard, I can list numerous scenes in which Viola D didn’t waver.

    Not only did she excellently project the required emotions of each scene, those emotions were subtle (in many cases) yet varied, yet strong, all at the same time. Any C- actor can emote, however, the crème de la crème actor shows emotions without exaggeration, while nevertheless giving us all the secondary emotions that comes with them. lets say tears. Say for instance a person is crying, what might have precipitated those tears - and - what emotion(s) might they be feeling while they’re crying, i.e., remorse, fear, confusion, sorrow, relief, disgust, bewilderment, lost hope, despair, abandonment, rejection, love, quizzical, frustration, joy, happiness, death, etc? I am suggesting the Viola’s performance projected emotions - many times - without tears and - sometime - without words. On top of that, it was an array/vast variety of emotions, not just those associated with pain, that really caught my eye - to a tee.

    1.Short list Tamara (many have not seen the movie)

    2.The many scenes in which her character and Octavia’s character shared laughs in the kitchen.

    3.Every scene in which she spoke of her son, especially the one pertaining to his “move” to the hospital.

    4.Her scenes in which she had to stand behind a wall or in the company with her employer and her friends when they made disparaging remarks about her.

    5. How about the bathroom scene.

    6. Her narration over several scenes.

    7. The night there was violence in the street

    8. Her scenes with the little girl and the differing emotions in each.

    In all those scenes Tamara (and more) not only did her facial expressions, her timing and cadence, capture the essence of the scenes, her body movements/physical actions, put a cherry on top of the cake. It's all about range and exemplification

    And I can say all the above - in many cases - for Octavia.

  • AccidentalVisitor | August 17, 2011 4:19 AMReply

    {{{ @ Mecca, why not try some up and coming black American actors who are on some of these series and looking for work. There’s plenty of them. (Don Cheadle,Mekhi Phifer, Omar Epps, Mechad Brooks, Amin Joseph, Tobias, Omari Hardwick, Truvillion, etc) }}}


    Considering the real life Northrup's mother was only a quarter black, I'm not certain that Ejiofor is a great match from a physical standpoint. But I sure as hell knows he is a better fit than Cheadle, Epps and Phifer. And in case you didn't realize it the short film careers of Epps and Phifer are essentially over.

    Mehcad Brooks hasn't proven he has the acting chops nor has Hardwick. They are terrible choices frankly.


    {{{ It’s not like they’re Chiwetel is a HUGE box office draw! }}}


    What black actor is other than Will and possibly Denzel? Ejiofor doesn't need to be a huge box office draw, just a great actor. I think he got that last part covered.

    {{{@ Accidentalvisitor who says? I was thought by my family and am very well informed of slavery and the results of it on the black American culture. The american history of slavery and racism is in itself an experience unlike any other culture.....}}}


    That doesn't mean a black actor from another country can't be just as good if not better than any African American actor in this role.


    @ Accidentalvisitor who says? I was thought by my family and am very well informed of slavery and the results of it on the black American culture. The american history of slavery and racism is in itself an experience unlike any other culture. There are many actors I personally know who have some status and would more than likely love to play the role. But it’s more about politics these days than anything. BS!!!

  • Tamara | August 17, 2011 3:54 AMReply

    Is it the subject matter or the perceived “quality” & pedigree associated?

    Just askin’...


    Touche...and yes. lol

    @ Carey, Oscar-time for V's role in "The Help?" Hmm. Is there a particular scene? What about Octavia's portion? Any scene with her worthy of little 'O? Just curious.

  • darkan | August 16, 2011 12:20 PMReply

    @ Mecca, why not try some up and coming black American actors who are on some of these series and looking for work. There's plenty of them. (Don Cheadle,Mekhi Phifer, Omar Epps, Mechad Brooks, Amin Joseph, Tobias, Omari Hardwick, Truvillion, etc) It's not like they're Chiwetel is a HUGE box office draw!
    @ Accidentalvisitor who says? I was thought by my family and am very well informed of slavery and the results of it on the black American culture. The american history of slavery and racism is in itself an experience unlike any other culture. There are many actors I personally know who have some status and would more than likely love to play the role. But it's more about politics these days than anything. BS!!!

  • T'Challa | August 16, 2011 11:30 AMReply

    Black Brits are taking over! I'm not mad..Chiwetel is a good actor, and if he wins in the end without being "saved" then I'm down with that, despite it being another slavery movie.

    I'm waiting on that French comedy movie about slavery, "Case Depart".. honestly that looks way more interesting than all these other "Black" films being put out..

  • AccidentalVisitor | August 16, 2011 11:29 AMReply

    Jamie Foxx is playing a slave, darkan. That should make you feel better/

    And frankly an African American born in modern times is not necessarily more likely to have a better grasp of "relating" to slavery than a black Brit of Nigerian heritage. And must I point out that the vast majority of African slaves brought to the new world did not end up on American shores? Therefore understanding of the issue is not necessarily limited to black people of the United States?

  • Neziah | August 16, 2011 11:25 AMReply

    McQueen's great and Ejiofor's great, enough said.

  • Mecca | August 16, 2011 10:54 AMReply

    @ Darkan

    Which actors do you have in mind?

  • darkan | August 16, 2011 10:47 AMReply

    No, no no!!! They need not do this. I can't understand how they have sooo many black Brits playing historical figures and roles dealing with black history and slavery. They can never relate with what black Americans have been through. It's funny how Hollywood is so quick to put them in the roles about our history but its rare to see American black actors play black British when there are some who can clearly get the job done!!!

  • Jug | August 16, 2011 10:47 AMReply

    Hmm I'm noticing that all the comments have been positive. Where are the "I don't wanna see that slave shit no more!!" rants?

    Is it the subject matter or the perceived "quality" & pedigree associated?

    Just askin'...

  • Tanya | August 16, 2011 8:15 AMReply

    I doubt it was Brad Pitt, his producing partner Dede Gardner usually does the heavy lifting where Plan B is concerned, Pitt doesn't really do too much.

    I am very interested in McQueen and Ejiofor working together on this though,should be fantastic with those two involved and I hear the source material is quite compelling.

  • Cynthia | August 16, 2011 8:10 AMReply

    Good for Brad Pitt for stepping outside his safety zone! I wonder if this project would have been looked at without him attached?

  • Tamara | August 16, 2011 8:01 AMReply

    And can we go ahead and pencil in Chiwetel for an Oscar nomination whenever this is released?

    Sure, why not? Chiewtel's awesome....and sexy. *wink*

    Give him free!!! ...and an Oscar. :P

  • urbanauteur | August 16, 2011 7:44 AMReply

    @Vanessa,hopefully not at the detriment of our slain(read:censored-writers/directors) whom SLAVE for years to get somekind of revelant voice dealing firsthand with OUR unblemished past.

  • Vanessa Martinez | August 16, 2011 7:23 AMReply

    You beat me to it :-) I can't wait to see what McQueen is developing, especially in the visual aspect.

    I had seen a screen adaptation for Northrup's odyssey years ago. I'm sure this will be totally different..

  • Mecca | August 16, 2011 7:22 AMReply

    Urbanateur, Yes he did!

    It was entitled "Solomon Northrup's Odyssey" S&A should check that one out.

  • JMac | August 16, 2011 7:22 AMReply

    If he did urbanauteur I'd rather watch that than this.

  • Mecca | August 16, 2011 7:20 AMReply

    Well, I hope it doesn't become a white savior film. You know how everything that gets made depicting an historical era always gets the Hollywood treatment.

  • urbanauteur | August 16, 2011 7:14 AMReply

    Did`nt director-Gordan Parks,sr. cover this in a PBS/america playhouse circa 1978- starring a young Avery Brooks?.

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