Stick Fly pic of Lydia Diamond, Alicia Keys and Kenny Leon

Lately, announcements of new Broadway shows centered on stories about black people, are usually accompanied with the words "directed by Kenny Leon," who seems to have emerged as the go-to black director for black shows on Broadway.

Last year alone, he directed 2 Broadway plays - The Mountaintop and Stick Fly - both have since ended their runs.

And he's gradually working his way into more TV and film work, with the upcoming all-African American Steel Magnolias, and upcoming feature films he's been attached to in recent years, although none has been realized yet.

And he's got a stage version of the 1967 Sidney Poitier drama Guess Who's Coming To Dinner coming up, that will be housed in Atlanta, which he talks about in the 10-minute interview below with ATL's NBC affiliate. 

In that same video interview, Leon reveals some of his upcoming projects, which, as we already know, includes a Broadway musical based on the work of Tupac Shakur, but also another project I'm only hearing about for the first time: a Broadway adaptation of the classic 1987 thriller Fatal Attraction, which starred Michael Douglas and Glenn Close, directed by Adrian Lyne.

The much-discussed film (made for $14 million) grossed $156.6 million in the US alone (over $300 million worldwide), and was the second highest-grossing film of 1987 behind Three Men and a Baby. It also received six Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Director, and more.

It left a lasting impression, and is still a reference point for many films that have come after it today; so I suppose I can understand Leon's desire to turn it into a Broadway show. Leon himself seems to prefer high-profile projects, looking at his recent resume, so that should also make this decision less of a surprise; he also loves to work with *name* actors and stars, usually blending a mixture of Hollywood and theater talent into his works, so I'll look for a similar strategy with Fatal Attraction the stage play.

As for who might be cast in this - specifically, whether it'll be another all-black cast version of a popular work - Leon doesn't say. But I'm going to lean towards that, since it's a gimmick that seems to be all the rage these days. 

And given Leon's casting tendencies (mix of Hollywood and theater world *name* talents), who would you cast in this?

Watch the interview below: