Scripted Film Starring People & Stories From Ethiopia's Omo Valley Tribes Blows Past Fundraising Goal

News
by Tambay A. Obenson
March 15, 2013 4:02 PM
5 Comments
  • |

Speaking of over-$100,000 Kickstarter campaigns, and the very low percentage of them that are actually successful (about 1%)... here's a project that I featured exactly a month ago on S&A, which has beat the odds and, not only raised its $150,000 campaign goal, but surpassed it by $12,000, with 4 days still to go in the campaign.

At the time of my posting in mid-February, the campaign had raised a third of its goal (about $50,000); so it's received over $100,000 in contributions since then! Obviously there's interest in the project and it looks like this film will be made.

I'd like to think that we had a little something to do with that... even just a little, wee bit.

Recapping the story...

In anticipation of what I know some of you will say - yes, I know, it's yet another film about Africans made by a non-African, specifically a white filmmaker.

But this one intrigued me greatly, and I liked the filmmaker's pitch/ideas for it, and felt that the campaign was worth a plug here last month.

It's a scripted feature narrative film (not a documentary by the way, which tends to be the common choice when white filmmakers make films about Africans), and it's titled People of the Delta.

The breakdown, courtesy of the project's Kickstarter page, reads:

People of the Delta is a cinematic narrative film collaborating with real people and stories from the tribes of Ethiopia's Omo Valley. 

The script was written with true events in mind, shaped from the collective wisdom of stories handed down from the elders of the Dassanach and Hamar tribes. These two tribes are historically known for competing against one another for the limited amount of fertile land found along the Omo River. This fragile way of life becomes the backbone of our film’s plot. 
Conflict over resources extends to every culture and country on the globe today, and is expressed with an entirely unique perspective in the film.

The story is told in two chapters from two unique perspectives. Kulcho- a young boy from the Hamar tribe who becomes a warrior, and Bona- an elder chief of the Daasanach. Although they are from rival tribes, their lives become connected.

The filmmaker's name is Joey L. - a Canadian commercial photographer/photojournalist director and published author, based in Brooklyn, NYC, who considers himself a "sensitive observer of endangered cultures and traditions," and who travels and shoots the world, creating lush portraits like the one you see above.

Some of his clients are top corporations like Coca-Cola, National Geographic, Verizon, Nickelodeon, History channel, The Government of Abu Dhabi and others. And his work has been exhibited in print, digitally, and at museums.

Based on the work of his that I've seen online, and the ideas he presents in the pitch video below, at the very least, this should be a well-shot piece of cinema. Of special note, he plans to use local men, women and children in casting the film. So this is very much their story. No white man in the picture, with Africans as background filler.

The campaign actually met its $150,000 goal 5 days ago.

Watch the pitch below, and if you'd like to add to the $162,000 that's been raised thus far, click HERE (or in the widget below) to head over to the project's Kickstarter page to make your contribution:


News
  • |
You might also like:
Free Indie Movies and Documentaries    

5 Comments

  • jeanettesdaughter | March 18, 2013 3:38 PMReply

    it's lovely. ' real stories and real people from the tribes,' bring it! i really don't care who the film makers are as long as the work is good and i do have the ability and the 'power' to evaluate that on my own. vanishing africa needs to be documented and dramatized. the past is prologue. as for those who want more urban stories featuring africans in clothing, there is plenty of that coming out of africa, too. has been since ousmane sembene began ages and ages ago. meanwhile, the outlook for the omo coming into the cities is not good. i say, let the indigine stay whereever they are and live where they want to live. global free enterprise ( it isn't really free, is it?) is driving the indigine/indigenous away from the land and into the cities. there are reserves to keep the wildlife alive and thriving, why not the indigine? we don't need any more " negros" trapped in poverty in the cities, trying to survive in the crossfire between the military (or the police) and the thieves and violent criminals that run the ghettos and slums everywhere!

  • Bani Productions | March 16, 2013 10:16 AMReply

    Of course it's going to get funding. It will have the visuals of Africa that everyone in the West believes is the "true Africa": nomads, warriors and naked people.
    Let me see one for a modern story set in the city, showcasing Africans in modern times without a western "saviour/protagonist/lost-tourist-in-search-of-him/herself" and I'll really applaud...

  • BluTopaz | March 16, 2013 11:30 AM

    Did you even watch the video, or simply decide to jump on the anti white savior trope bandwagon?

  • Winston | March 15, 2013 11:30 PMReply

    This is definitely one to look out for. Go Ethiopia!

  • sen2860 | March 16, 2013 7:47 AM

    I agree :D

Follow Shadow and Act

Email Updates

Most "Liked"

  • Taraji P. Henson Drama 'From The Rough' ...
  • Electro (Jamie Foxx) Faces Off Against ...
  • Watch Omar Sy In Action As Bishop In ...
  • Black Movie Trivia - Congrats to our ...
  • Interview: Chatting with RZA About Paul ...
  • Sidney Poitier Made Oscar History Today ...
  • Watch TV ONE’s Fascinating & Informative ...
  • Critically-Acclaimed Doc 'The Trials ...
  • Weekend B.O. April 11-13 (Close, But ...
  • GLAAD Awards Honors Jennifer Lopez-Produced ...