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It's A Difficult Time To Be A Black Filmmaker w/ An imagination (Or An Open Letter to Viola Davis)

  • By Tanya Steele
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  • June 24, 2013 4:11 PM
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  • 139 Comments
I was so excited to see the Viola Davis spread in the LA times. I thought, my goodness, when is the last time I saw a Black 'star' take off the wig and go au natural. Loved it! I'm thinking, yes, we are becoming courageous enough to be who we are, not who others want us to be.

A Young Viola Davis Thought Experiment (An "Open Letter..." Rebuttal)

  • By Charles Judson
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  • February 14, 2012 6:42 PM
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  • 15 Comments
It’s been fascinating to read all the dissection of THE HELP and Viola Davis’s statements and career; a dissection that’s been filtered through mostly a 2011/2012 lens.

Post-Blackness: Every Movement Needs a Manifesto

  • By Andre Seewood
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  • December 19, 2011 1:26 PM
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  • 8 Comments
More: Reviews, oped

"Dreams Of A Life" Director Carol Morley In Her own Words On The Challenges She Faced In Financing The Film

  • By Tambay A. Obenson
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  • December 12, 2011 6:22 PM
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  • 2 Comments
By now, I'm sure you're probably all intimately familiar with Carol Morley's Dreams Of A Life, which stars Zawe Ashton, who Emmanuel recently interviewed (read that post HERE, if you haven't; you really should).

Thandie Newton's Recent Rants-- Is She Right, Or Does She Need A Reality Check?

  • By Emmanuel Akitobi
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  • October 25, 2011 9:48 AM
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  • 49 Comments
In the past month, several news outlets have reported on recent comments allegedly made by actress Thandie Newton regarding race and the entertainment industry.

Is Interracial Coupling On TV Meant To Soften The Blow Of Casting Black Leads?

  • By Emmanuel Akitobi
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  • October 24, 2011 7:22 AM
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  • 66 Comments
I recently got my hands on a DVD copy of the BBC's acclaimed 2010 legal drama, Accused. The six-part series features the stories of six separate characters who have, through various circumstances, found themselves entangled in the criminal justice system, sitting in a courtroom, awaiting their individual fates. Throughout each episode, viewers learn how they ended up there in the first place.

L.A. Rebellion 2011 Retrospective Review - Jamaa Fanaka's "Penitentiary"

  • By Brandon Wilson
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  • October 18, 2011 2:12 AM
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  • 9 Comments
In two weekends time, the L.A. Rebellion retrospective at the at the Hammer Museum, hosted by the UCLA Film & Television Archive, is shaping up to be the year’s most important series. Sadly, the competition is weak these days (what with the New Beverly devoted to grindhouse spanophilia, American Cinematheque having lost all of its programming chi and the LACMA film program having been decapitated – sorry times for L.A. cinephiles).
More: oped

Julie Dash's "Daughters of the Dust" 20 Years Later (L.A. Rebellion Retrospective)

  • By Jasmin
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  • October 12, 2011 5:15 AM
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  • 5 Comments
Here's the next installment in our ongoing coverage of L.A. Rebellion: Creating a New Black Cinema, the current retrospective of black filmmakers being showcased at UCLA.
More: oped, Event

On Film Criticism And Moving The Conversation Beyond Words (A History Lesson)

  • By Tambay A. Obenson
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  • September 26, 2011 4:06 AM
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  • 6 Comments
From time to time, I like to dig into the S&A archives and dig up old items (usually op-eds/editorials/interviews) to repost, often because the content of those entries still apply, are still relevant, or call for a reposting due to a recent conversation, debate, or other related recently-posted item.

Do You Eat Chitlins? "Electric Purgatory" And The Boundaries Of African-American Racial Identity

  • By Andre Seewood
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  • September 19, 2011 4:47 AM
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  • 8 Comments
The brilliant documentary film, ELECTRIC PURGATORY: The Fate of the Black Rocker, by filmmaker Raymond Gayle illuminates and challenges the boundaries of African-American racial identity as a substantive testimonial that reveals how the music industry and even some African-Americans themselves subscribe to a limited perspective on our own human potential and artistic ability.
More: oped