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"The Best Man" Sequel in the Works from Malcolm D. Lee

by Jasmin
October 10, 2011 11:49 AM
34 Comments
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Addendum: Malcolm D. Lee recently Tweeted his confirmation of the original report:

And you know what they say, "once it's tweeted, it is true." Apparently, The Best Man Sequel is definitely under way. We'll keep our ears to the ground for news as it develops.

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More than a decade after The Best Man starred Taye Diggs, Nia Long, Terrance Howard, and Morris Chestnut as a group of old friends that reunite for a wedding, plans for a reported sequel are in the works.

Deadline reports that Malcolm D. Lee, who wrote and directed the first film, began considering a sequel to the romantic comedy after having a reunion dinner with several members of the original cast.

The film starred Diggs as a writer who plans to act as best man in the wedding of his football player buddy (Chestnut), but scrambles around the release of his autobiographical novel, which tells how he slept with the bride.

The sequel moves forward at Universal Pictures with Lee planned to write, direct and produce.

Word is that this film will reprise the original cast, which also includes Sanaa Lathan, Monica Calhoun, Melissa De Sousa and Harold Perrineau.

While I'm not sure how I feel about a sequel this late in the game, I'm interested to see how well it's executed, and what kind of story will be built around the characters this time around. And judging from the number of Best Man fans out there, my guess is that many of you will be checking for this film as well.

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34 Comments

  • CareyCarey | October 14, 2011 4:36 AMReply

    This “octopus” conversation has gone on long enough. I mean, since one of my “professions” is working with drug addicted individuals I see and hear this form of rationalization, justification and deflection on a regular basis. Many addicts are in deep denial and therefore shift blame to other people, places and things, as a way to deflect the core issues of their misconduct and poor decision making, which allows them to continue to do what THEY want to do.

    So now we have the core issue in this debate, interracial relationships, being used as a quasi weapon against those who oppose such relationships. First and foremost, those forms of unions are in the MINORITY. Okay, lets get that straight. Most white people and blacks alike, do not condone such mixing of the races. But those who do (Accidental Visitor has said his sister is married to a white man) try to flip the script with statements like this----->

    “Obviously there are folks who won’t support Diggs because of it. Sad but true. They have reasons that they feel are justified but white folks who have those same reasons, and would be clearly labeled as racists by the black masses, also believe that they are righteous in their views and not tainted by prejudice or insecurity. Both groups have issues in regards to their own personal bigotries and bitterness. But carey-carey suggests we should not speak for them so I’ll allow him to carry the banner proudly for those folks” by Accidental Visitor

    Justified but clearly labeled as racists? Here we go, the woefully false premise smokescreen.

    So, although the overwhelming majority of citizens in this world have reasons not to ingratiate the union of a white person and a black person, it’s justified to label them as racists, righteous, prejudice and insecure, while the MINORITY group (IR couples) acquires the role of the victims and the leaders of justice?

    That ploy of shifting blame and “fault” is not only used by drug addicts and the MINORITY who marry outside their race, it’s been used quite effectively by the gay crowd. Their tactic involves labeling those who do not believe that two men can make a baby, nor should they try to by any form of sex act, are “homophobic”. They use that word in such a manner to imply that the MAJORITY of people in this world -- who would not be here if their parents were homosexuals -- are the new demons of hatred. Yes, deflecting guilt, pain, and wayward activity, by attaching “negative” names on the opposing voices (which in this case - AGAIN - are the MAJORITY) is an effective weapon, but it does not work on everyone.

    But yet, we have Accidental Visitor usher in a small group (MINORITY among all black actors) group of black actors who married outside their race, as if their actions were to be emulated, and acceptable behavior to all humans. Please, spare us from that side show. And anyone who opposed those unions for whatever reasons, are bitter, racist, homophobic and insecure villains? PLEASE... save that for a kindergarten debate.

    In short, this conversation took a path that’s frequently traveled by those who desire to push an agenda that they themselves love. Listen, to assert that millions of people DO NOT make decisions on which movies they will and will not spend their money on, based on the “lifestyle” ... “marriages union” and color of an actors skin, is simply not true. It’s done every day by millions of people who are not amoral, nor without compassion. And definitely, not all of them are racist.

    Consequently, it’s become a futile effort and a fool’s errand to chase the opposing comments around this board as they shift, shake and cloud the issue to ease their own discomfort and false sense of righteousness.

  • AccidentalVisitor | October 14, 2011 2:28 AMReply

    {{{ I doubt that anyone is going to not see a Taye Diggs movie because his wife (Tony award winning actress Irina Mazel) is White. }}}

    Obviously there are folks who won't support Diggs because of it. Sad but true. They have reasons that they feel are justified but white folks who have those same reasons, and would be clearly labeled as racists by the black masses, also believe that they are righteous in their views and not tainted by prejudice or insecurity. Both groups have issues in regards to their own personal bigotries and bitterness. But carey-carey suggests we should not speak for them so I'll allow him to carry the banner proudly for those folks.

    {{{ How badly did having a non-Black wife hurt Billy Dee Williams, Sidney Poitier, and Richard Pryor with Black audiences? }}}


    Don’t stop there. Sammy Davis Jr., Lena Horne, Dorthy Dandridge, James Earl Jones, Diane Carroll, Diana Ross, Whoopi Goldberg. There have been many top black stars who were guilty as charged by marrying non-black people and yet somehow the American black community managed to survive. The black movie-going public even handed over their hard earned cash to watch these stars on the big screen. Perhaps they were just unenlightened.

    {{{ Really we could go before Fresh Prince TV show and go back to his underground rap. (Young) Black people knew him, liked him, and put mucho money in his pockets before anyone ever dreamt of the tv show. Is that not a major reason why he got his own show to begin with? Is that not why black rappers/singers get preferential treatment for acting roles?

    You’re probably doing the same thing as AV - starting at motion picture films instead of going back to the very beginning. Point is they were known in the black community (singing, acting on stage, acting on tv) first then went to mainstream film. In your examples of mainstream actors who I’M ASSUMING didn’t have a core black audience to get where they are (too lazy to look up their biographies) two of them aren’t even American and didn’t get their start here so I can’t speak to that.
    }}}

    The disagreement I have is that the first mention of this specific topic came about regarding comments of “core audience”. By media standards as soon as Will Smith became a mega star who films constantly made loads of cash, his core audience by definition had changed. Black audiences were no longer the core. His core became much broader and it is only because of that new core that rocketed him to A list heights. That is undisputable. When Smith, his producers and the studios talk about finding the right role for him that his core audience will get behind, do you really think they are referring to black moviegoers? The same can be said about Michael Jackson on the music side. An argument can easily be made that Jackson’s greatest and most loyal defenders were black people, but when he was at his peak his core audience was no longer the black consumers.

    The first audience tends to be a bit more loyal but that first audience is not necessarily the core audience once an individual reaches a certain level of success. Many citizens of Ireland go around claiming how they were the first to back their native son, Michael Fassbender. But as he grows bigger in the eyes of movie fans can those same Irish folks be considered his core support anymore? Not likely. Granted it may come down to how one interprets “core audience” in the first place. Nonetheless my stance remains the same. Black audiences are in general not loyal enough to enough of black actors and actresses to pat themselves on the back about being a core support to anybody. They let too many films not directed by Tyler Perry die on the vine. They couldn’t even get behind Oprah’s “Beloved”. Can anyone think of one black star that the studios will greenlight numerous projects for because there is such a successful record of a core black audience supporting mostly anything he/she does? I’m not talking about the black stars who have crossed over as mainstream A list types. If black audiences supported individual actors and actresses the way they do Mr. Perry, then plenty of more of them would be stars of major motion pictures. And then the black audience could truly claim to be the core audience that many of you are suggesting it already is.

  • AccidentalVisitor | October 14, 2011 1:48 AMReply

    {{{ Groups of black women came out to see Boyz In the Hood, Juice, anything Spike Lee put out, most anything else John Singleton put out, etc. }}}

    And groups of white women likely saw X-Men and a number of Martin Scorcese flicks. That doesn’t make them the key demographic of those motion pictures. Thing is I never said black ladies didn’t check out the films you listed as examples anyway. But I do beg to differ abot the overall attraction some of those movies had to that particular audience. "Waiting to Exhale"? Yes. "Menace II Society". No.

    {{{Why should we care who people date/marry off screen? You’re actually asking that question in regards to a movie about black marriage?}}}

    Yes, I am because believe it or not the people on the screen are acting a role. Imagine that. I would ask the same question of any gay person who objected to heterosexual actors playing gay characters in “Milk”. It is called performing. You sound like those folks who were worried that when Anne Heche started dating Ellen her career would be over immediately because straight men would no longer accept her playing heterosexual women in movies. The implication sounded stupid then and it sounds stupid now, even if we're talking about so-called racial preference instead of sexual orientation (there is also a well-known black celebrity who was a music star before she became an actress who has done her share of romantic comedies despite the widespread view that she is closeted lesbian). After all most actors and actresses play roles that contradict what they do and who they are in the real world. Hollywood is selling people mostly fantasies anyway. If anyone has a problem about the race of the significant other of an actor/actress, then that says something unflattering about the person doing the judging. It is none of our business. Hiding behind a front such as "well, it is a movie about black marriage so the person in real life should be blah, blah, blah" is a poor defense. And to be blunt the ways things are going it may be harder to cast such black romance films in the future without using "race-traitors" (which is basically what some of you are referring to them as). “Jumping the Broom” was the biggest such film of this year and its lead actress is married to a white man. Anyone here going apeshit over that? Should casting agents and directors do background checks of all black thespians in such films to ensure there isn’t any history of miscegenation in their past?

    {{{And in regards to some particular black male actors/singers/models it’s not just who they date/marry but that they feel the need to throw black women under the damn bus, usually in a pathetic attempt to justify why they date outside the race. }}}

    Those individuals that make such claims are to be avoided or boycotted if they upset you. There have been despicable things said out there and I don’t blame you for being weary of those types of clowns. From as far as I know most of them appear to be idiotic athletes on reality shows. The harsh reality is that many kinds of black people have made it a habit of disparaging their own people by their peculiar use of the adjective “black” at times. Instead of comments such as “men are digs” and “women are gold-diggers” as white people may say, far too many black folks go with “BLACK men are dogs” and “BLACK women are gold-diggers”. This is a disease within the community so should it be any surprise when it publicly shows its ugly head via the ludicrous statements of a handful of black celebrities? And it is not just people without brains making such statements. Successful black female novelists and playwrights such as Alice Walker and Ntozake Shange have expressed nasty and unflattering opinions of black men at one time or another during their careers. Equal blame within the race to go around in my opinion.

    However posters on this site are throwing black celebs under the bus EVEN if they didn’t make such insulting comments. These celebrities instead become targets of venom because they had the audacity to marry outside their race.

    You also write that while not certain you wouldn’t be surprised that if some male posters on this site did take shots at the actresses in ‘For Colored Girls” because of who they have dated or married in real life. That’s possible. But what about you? Did you take issue with whom Whoopi, Thandie, Kerry, etc. have dated/married? If the answer is “no” then that’s great. Those ladies should not be judge by that part of their personal lives and certainly their work should not be either. But you would be hypocritical if you decided to deride black male celebs for doing the same thing, and there is no getting around that. You would be saying it is okay for one group, not so okay for the other.

  • JMac | October 13, 2011 5:01 AMReply

    Thanks for the back up CC.

    Really we could go before Fresh Prince TV show and go back to his underground rap. (Young) Black people knew him, liked him, and put mucho money in his pockets before anyone ever dreamt of the tv show. Is that not a major reason why he got his own show to begin with? Is that not why black rappers/singers get preferential treatment for acting roles?

    You're probably doing the same thing as AV - starting at motion picture films instead of going back to the very beginning. Point is they were known in the black community (singing, acting on stage, acting on tv) first then went to mainstream film. In your examples of mainstream actors who I'M ASSUMING didn't have a core black audience to get where they are (too lazy to look up their biographies) two of them aren't even American and didn't get their start here so I can't speak to that. Jeffrey Wright isn't exactly someone I'd consider a "mainstream" black actor - but that's debatable. Morgan Freeman acted in plenty of black tv and movie films [after being the biggest, hippest "brotha" on The Electric Company] before his white audience breakout role in Driving Miss Daisy. Hell, the man even played Malcolm X! I vaguely remembered him in Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry. Alright. Outta Sight.

    {{I doubt that anyone is going to not see a Taye Diggs movie because his wife (Tony award winning actress Irina Mazel) is White.}}
    They might esp since he said stupid ish about black women - which is my main problem. Date/Marry who you want but keep your damn mouth shut. I'm not responsible for your family screwing you up to the point you can't date/marry sisters.

    {{How badly did having a non-Black wife hurt Billy Dee Williams, Sidney Poitier, and Richard Pryor with Black audiences?}}
    Did they say disgraceful, stupid ish about black women at the same time... when not under the influence of drugs (have to add that for Richard - just in case)?

    Everyone has their own limits.

    Slightly O/T - I ran across a book on Amazon called The Top 25 Things Black Folks Do That We Need to Stop!!! Issue #9 is Getting Rich and Famous... then Marrying White Women, lol. Many of the issues are pretty dead on but I'm still going to celebrate the Fourth of July. Only time you can shoot off fireworks within city limits.

  • CareyCarey | October 13, 2011 4:01 AMReply

    "I doubt that anyone is going to not see a Taye Diggs movie because his wife (Tony award winning actress Irina Mazel) is White. How badly did having a non-Black wife hurt Billy Dee Williams, Sidney Poitier, and Richard Pryor with Black audiences?"

    That's a totally moot point. First, JMac's comment referred to movies involving black Marriage/romance on screen! Beside, how many relationship films did any of the above actor participate in? Yeah, "Coming To Dinner" was ripe with controversy and I don't believe Sidney and the white women were even seen in a long embrace.

    "Granted Will Smith was in “Fresh Prince,” but his early film roles (“Where the day takes you,” “Six Degrees of Separation”) were NOT aimed at Black audiences"

    Excuse me, you should have stopped at Fresh Prince b/c that IS were he cultivated his black audience, not "Six Degrees. Nice try but no cigar.

    And again, who said anything about NOT seeing a movie because of the color of one's spouse -huh? Who's making that argument? I believe JMac said "genuineness of the actor playing a romantic role in a romcom movie. Kind of hard to lose yourself in the story when you know the person has black women issues in real life"

    Her comment was in reponse to someone saying romance between IR couples is not a big deal. Obviously it is, as the rest of her comment illustrated.

    So, if IR romance off-screen or on the big screen is no big deal to you, have at it. But you cannot and should not speak for others.

  • B-Rob | October 12, 2011 12:35 PMReply

    JMac wrote "No mainstream actor (or singer/musician for that matter) ever shot up to the big leagues without cultivating a core black audience first. Might be possible now but I doubt it anyone would want to try it."

    Huh? Granted Will Smith was in "Fresh Prince," but his early film roles ("Where the day takes you," "Six Degrees of Separation") were NOT aimed at Black audiences. You trying to tell me that Jeffrey Wright aimed his film career at a "core black audience" when he was in "Angels in America"? Morgan Freeman's entire career was built AVOIDING those roles that would be aimed at a "core black audience". Ditto Thandi Newton, Audra McDonald, and many other actors whose names I cannot even recall at the moment.

    I doubt that anyone is going to not see a Taye Diggs movie because his wife (Tony award winning actress Irina Mazel) is White. How badly did having a non-Black wife hurt Billy Dee Williams, Sidney Poitier, and Richard Pryor with Black audiences?

  • JMac | October 12, 2011 10:16 AMReply

    No, Michelle Obama 2012!!!

  • Cherish | October 12, 2011 3:17 AMReply

    "No mainstream actor (or singer/musician for that matter) ever shot up to the big leagues without cultivating a core black audience first. "

    That's the key right there. Kudos to Jmac for breaking it down.

  • CareyCarey | October 12, 2011 1:45 AMReply

    JMac, you killed the IR issue! I get so tired of black folks minimizing the true nature and affects of those that married white people while snubbing their noses a black women. And we all know there's a particular difference in black men that marry white women. You said it earlier JMac, their vibe sticks out like a sore thumb. In most crowds, after a short bit of conversation they will show their hand.

    The following smashed this "conversation"!

    "You’re actually asking that question in regards to a movie about black marriage? ... But here it’s obvious why it matters - genuineness of the actor playing a romantic role in a romcom movie. Kind of hard to lose yourself in the story when you know the person has black women issues in real life. And in regards to some particular black male actors/singers/models it’s not just who they date/marry but that they feel the need to throw black women under the damn bus, usually in a pathetic attempt to justify why they date outside the race"

    AND!

    "Wanna bet if Mel Gibson ever plays a role as a Jew or the white coach of a black football team some people won’t raise a big stink about it. A non-issue? HARDLY!!!!

  • Tessa | October 12, 2011 1:22 AMReply

    JMAC FOR PRESIDENT 2012!!! LOL

  • JMac | October 11, 2011 12:55 PMReply

    Now we're getting into a great conversation!

    Granted it's been some years ago, but the trailers I remembered seeing did not emphasize the number of black women in this film. The focus was on the guys with a hint of black women in the background. To say black women came out just to see other black women would be ignoring the fact that the men were still the main attraction....not just men but marrying men. Ka-ching! You seem to think that we (black women) are so particular we only go out in groups to watch chick flicks. Groups of black women came out to see Boyz In the Hood, Juice, anything Spike Lee put out, most anything else John Singleton put out, etc... Most of those films definitely weren't women-centered yet there we were.

    Why should we care who people date/marry off screen? You're actually asking that question in regards to a movie about black marriage? If it was just a standard cops and robbers or horror flick, it wouldn't matter. But here it's obvious why it matters - genuineness of the actor playing a romantic role in a romcom movie. Kind of hard to lose yourself in the story when you know the person has black women issues in real life. And in regards to some particular black male actors/singers/models it's not just who they date/marry but that they feel the need to throw black women under the damn bus, usually in a pathetic attempt to justify why they date outside the race. Okay I get it, all black women are screwed up and completely undesirable (evident by them dating every black woman in the world) so they had no other choice. Yeah. Right. Sure. Whatever helps them sleep. Cherish was being considerate when she quoted below. Other things that have been said are a lot worse. Wanna bet if Mel Gibson ever plays a role as a Jew or the white coach of a black football team some people won't raise a big stink about it. A non-issue? Hardly.

    I don't remember anyone here posting anything about the For Colored Girl's actresses' relationships but I bet some did somewhere. Probably the same black guys who laughed at Stacey Dash after learning about her divorce from a white guy over allegations of his domestic violence. Or the ones who snickered when Miss Halle claimed her ex-beau called her a nigger repeatedly. I did hear black guys lamenting about the lack of positive black men in the movie. Some here would say that's a non-issue too. I think it's relevant - in a overall sense.

    {{Guys like Diggs and Howard don’t get that type of boost from anyone in the black community.}}

    When it's a black movie that will attract and be marketed towards predominantly black audiences, they could and they'd need to.

    {{To be honest I don’t think Denzel, Will or Halle do either because they have crossed over to the mainstream}}

    Again, when you could only find them in black movies or black tv shows, they most definitely needed black audiences. Without our boosting them up, they wouldn't have gotten the attention of mainstream Hollywood.

    {{Did Will Smith go that route? Is Zoe going that route?}}
    See above. No mainstream actor (or singer/musician for that matter) ever shot up to the big leagues without cultivating a core black audience first. Might be possible now but I doubt it anyone would want to try it.

    I really don't know what measure you're using to assert that nobody knew Taye or Terrance before this movie. I already explained Taye's primary claim to fame/attraction. Terrance Howard appeared on several black tv shows for years before doing this movie. He wasn't an unknown. Black people at least recognized his face if not his name. Are you referring to white audiences?

  • Nikki | October 11, 2011 12:12 PMReply

    I was just watching this the other day. I love this movie, I will definitely see it.

  • Janice | October 11, 2011 12:00 PMReply

    Looking forward to this. Hope Terrance "Baby Wipes" Howard is included. :D

  • Starr | October 11, 2011 11:51 AMReply

    Thank you Malcomb!!!!now these negative comments must end.
    I'm glad that our Black writer producer will be giving people a chance to get to work. th epersonal lives of the actors are nobodys business. It's fiction, if you really pay attention to the story its all about love. Now, for the haters hate on!!!!cause Malcomb can choose who ever he wants and I truly loved the first movie. You are lying when you say Taye Diggs wasnt known, he was the real deal in Stella got her groove back, Terrance has so many films and movies he dont have to prove nothing to you, Morris Chestnut..............still fine.. excellent in plays, the dude with dreads starred in oz and many more. So stop all the negative comments and think of positive ones. Or maybe since you think you no the film business so good, go for a casting call ..we cant wait to see you and hear of all of your skeletons!!!Support black films!!! starr..mom of an actress

  • aliciafiasco | October 11, 2011 11:44 AMReply

    I fully support this sequel because I loved the cast, but my one condition is that it MUST BE BETTER WRITTEN. The first script had so many flaws and plot holes (I mean, what man reads a bogus ass book during his Bachelor party?!) that the cast had to make up for it. Also, Monica Calhoun gave the worst performance (second to Taye) and if I were writing it, she would run off with somebody else and leave poor Lance to find solace in Jordan's arms. But then, I'm not writing, lol! Either way, I'll probably go see it, I just hope and pray Malcolm has been honing his writing and storytelling skills over the past 10 years.

  • AccidentalVisitor | October 11, 2011 10:26 AMReply

    We'll have to agree to disagree, Jmac. I only knew of only one black lady interested in "The Best Man" because of Taye Diggs. People still barely knew him at the time, he wasn't THAT well known of a commodity. And he surely wasn’t an automatic draw for black female viewers. Those ladies must have not seen the ads for “The Wood” which came out the same year, huh? “The Best Man” simply happen to be the more entertaining film of the two. And hardly anybody knew who the heck Terrence Howard was during this time and yet someone here also claimed that black women went out in force to see him and Taye in the movie? Absurd. Black women go out in force (like in groups) to see movies which heavily feature black women. And ‘The Best Man” gave them the type of buppie, bourgeoisie romance that they love. One could argue that it set the standard for all the upper middle class black romantic comedies that have followed since.

    That being said some of these comments here are interesting. First of all are we as blacks lowering the bar mightily by claiming “The Best Man” is a classic? Really? It is an enjoyable film but that is about all.

    Why should we care about whom people decide to date/marry off-screen? What do their real lives have to do with opinion of their work or the films they appear in? Is this some sort of insecurity? Are we making our own black version of Storm Front? We can debate what’s going on with IR on screen but I wouldn’t stoop so low to judge a black person by whom they choose as a mate. If I had that type of bigotry within me (and yes it is bigotry) I wouldn’t think too highly of many of the high profile black actresses working in film today. However fortunately in understand it is none of my business whom these women (and men) sleep with. When there was criticism directed at the film version of “For Colored Girls” I can’t recall once when any poster went on about how a few of the black female leads have been or were in relationships with non-black men. Again it should be a non-issue.

    Taye Diggs’ comment about what his mother knew about whom he’d end up with may have been unnecessarily shared with a listening audience, but was it stupid? I don’t know the context of the conversation that took place but I didn’t read anything which suggested he was slamming black women or making some sort of ignorant statement in general. He has never made disrespectful comments about black women at all. His only “disrespect” appears to be his choice of a partner. That attitude says more about the person bitchin’ about it than it does Diggs.

    {{{ Haha, yeah hopefully they remember who their core audience is.}}}}

    Core audience? A core audience must almost always prop up the box-office of a particular performer. Guys like Diggs and Howard don’t get that type of boost from anyone in the black community. To be honest I don’t think Denzel, Will or Halle do either because they have crossed over to the mainstream. A person who does get that type of support? Tyler Perry. He has a true black core audience, a strong black female fan base in particular. Besides why should someone like Terrence Howard try to limit himself by having a core audience of black viewers? Did Will Smith go that route? Is Zoe going that route? No, and they can reach a greater audience as a result by not being tied down to the whims of a fraction of the movie going community.

  • Mecca | October 11, 2011 10:20 AMReply

    Hmm. Interesting.

    I'm wondering if they will bring back the actress who played the stripper? (Can't remember her name) she appeared in season 1 of Law & Order: L.A.

  • Neziah | October 11, 2011 5:19 AMReply

    Hopefully this makes up for the disaster known as Welcome Home, Roscoe Jenkins.

  • Nadell | October 11, 2011 5:03 AMReply

    Noooooooooooooo! Why can't folks just leave the classic, masterpieces alone???

  • CareyCarey | October 11, 2011 3:54 AMReply

    "Haha - good question! 3 out of the 4 male leads have non-Black spouses"

    REALLY! WHO? I didn't know that.

    Huuuuum, very interesting... I wonder who they are and the "background" of their spouses?

    Jug, are you one of the writers? Your storyline would sell like a prostitute in a prison camp and a Hostess Twinkee at a weight loss farm. .

  • JMac | October 11, 2011 3:08 AMReply

    Oops, I forgot my obligatory screech...

    Morris Chestnut! Wooooooooooooo!!!!

    Yeah, he's the only one I cared about in that movie. Ever since Boyz, I've loved, loved, loved him. Never checked out his relationship status 'til now but it doesn't surprise me he married a sister. Some black men have that vibe more than others.
    **********************
    Back to the post

  • Cherish | October 11, 2011 2:28 AMReply

    "...hopefully none of the men will say some stupid ish before the film opens."

    Oh why Jmac, could you be referring to ish like:

    "My Mom always knew I would marry a White girl."

    or

    "I want a woman with 'good hair' "

    Haha, yeah hopefully they remember who their core audience is.

  • Cherish | October 11, 2011 2:25 AMReply

    Jmac,

    I agree. Taye Diggs did play a role in me and my girls seeing that movie as well.

    But when Morris Chesnutt appeared on the screen, we literally went "Taye who?" LOL

    Orville, hopefully the story will be told from that perspective (fortysomethings and life issues being dealt with.) We could use a Black story from that end. It's rarely shown.

  • JMac | October 11, 2011 1:29 AMReply

    Oh, and hopefully none of the men will say some stupid ish before the film opens.

  • Tariq | October 11, 2011 1:28 AMReply

    Terrance married to a white woman (now divorced tho)

    Dude w/ dreads married to a white woman

    Taye married to Jewish woman

    smdh...get it together fam

  • JMac | October 11, 2011 1:26 AMReply

    Speak for yourself AV :D You know Taye Diggs was still riding high off of How Stella Got Her Groove Back when this flick came out. I know it motivated several of my girlfriends. True they would have watched w/o him (and w/o some of the other men) but it was icing on the cake.

    At least it won't be as terrible as that 'Put a Ring On It' dvd bomb. Let's hope he doesn't TP it either.

  • orville | October 10, 2011 12:34 PMReply

    I think sequel would be interesting since all the actors are in their 40s now. It would so nice to see a sequel but it has to be good!

  • Jug | October 10, 2011 12:04 PMReply

    BM part 2-Lance is a wife beater, Harper is divorced..three times, Merch has come out (or is on the down low), Quentin has AIDS & Jordan, Robin & Mia all scream at each other & have lost their jobs thanks to no count, low down dirty men.

    Sorry...thought TP was doing this one

    jk, can't wait for this, hope it goes the distance!

  • misha | October 10, 2011 11:35 AMReply

    Eeeeeee!!!! LOL The Best Man is one of my absolute favorites so I'm definitely excited about this news. I know many others are too, considering how often Malcolm is asked about it on twitter. And here it is finally coming to fruition. I know some may hesitate to support a sequel but I have faith that Malcolm will once again deliver.

    @JMac Ha. Despite souring on both Terrence and Taye, I can honestly say that I still very much enjoy their characters/performances every time I watch this film. This is one of the few films in which I actually like/love all the characters

  • AccidentalVisitor | October 10, 2011 11:24 AMReply

    {{{ What a difference a decade makes. Will black women flock to this film [with Taye and Terrance] like they did with the original? Maybe. I’m also curious how this will turn out.

    }}}}

    Black women didn't flock to the film last time because of those two. They went to see the film because they wanted to see themselves on the big screen in a reasonably good movie.

  • Sonny | October 10, 2011 9:59 AMReply

    Really? They better leave this alone! Like when they talked about remaking or making a sequel to Love Jones. See how the crowd reacted to that! This is another classic that needs to ride solo. Just make another black romantic dramedy but not a sequel!

  • Cherish | October 10, 2011 9:56 AMReply

    @Jmac.

    Haha - good question! 3 out of the 4 male leads have non-Black spouses. LOL.

    But I don't think that will have a big impact on turnout. I rather see a different film. I guess it will depend on look of film.

  • JMac | October 10, 2011 9:27 AMReply

    What a difference a decade makes. Will black women flock to this film [with Taye and Terrance] like they did with the original? Maybe. I'm also curious how this will turn out.

  • Jai | October 10, 2011 9:19 AMReply

    Interesting, will the 'couples' still be together?

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