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"Toddlers" Movie Causing A Huge Hue And Cry

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by Sergio
January 6, 2012 10:44 AM
34 Comments
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Toddlers

I think it's been at least a week since a black film has caused some controversy; here's this week's addition.

I'm referring to the film Toddlers which was released on DVD in New York last month, and has stirred up a lot of anger, some even calling for a boycott.

The film, which was made entirely in Harlem and directed by Terrence Brown, is yet another one of those drugs and guns 'n' da hood" movies, but the gimmick is that the cast is made up of neighborhood kids, some as young as 12 years old.

Brown claims that he's not an exploiter or glorifying violence but, you know, just "keeping it real":  "That's what's going on, I'm just showing it, You hear about these murders, but people don't see how it happens. I show how these incidents happen. These are real life situations." (But then again, isn't that what filmmakers always say when conforonted about those kind of images in films like this? You mean there are some people on this planet who don't know? Sounds to me like Brown is really a guy out to make a quick couple of bucks. But then that's just me)

However, anti-gang and violence organizations are outraged by the film. Jackie Rowe-Adams who runs Harlem Mothers S.A.V.E said that the film should "be banned" and that it brought back memories of her son being killed: "All I could think about was that 13-year-old killing my son"

Iesha Sekou of Street Corner Resources in N.Y. is also upset with the film: "This is not entertainment. We don't need to promote kids carrying guns."

Both Sekou and Rowe-Adams are planning a boycott movement on stores that carry the DVD.

However Brown is not worried about any protests: "This is not new. It's entertaining in the end but it's not for everyone".

I'm sure you'll have your say abut this.

Below is the trailer:

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34 Comments

  • water | January 10, 2012 10:31 PMReply

    I'm with Ray on this one! what folks need to realize is that "THIS IS REAL"...maybe if this violence made the media "every day", families would wake up and take notice that the streets have more of a hold on our children then the people who gave them life. I'm a product of that enviroment, i grew up in the bronx and my hommies where all the local drug dealers and most had bodies on their belt. This movie isnt promoting violence its showing you that you need to tell your babies good night stories, walk them to school, kiss them, tell him he is smart, tell her she is all that, take them to lunch, take them on a car ride and dont wait for the school's field trip, its making you responsible for your babies, its waking you up that your baby, nephew, brother can be next!! The streets have taken away good men and talented woman but we also let them go. We have the power to change but we have become complasive as a community and we sit and wait to see what everyone else is going to do first and we are still coming up last.
    you always hear the whisper ( from God) now you have to listen, carry your own cross..dont blame the film maker for true life...it is what it is..now make a diffrence... my daughter graduated with her bachelors and my 11 year old son is an all star student, im only 38 ...some body call it.......

  • Mike | January 9, 2012 3:01 PMReply

    Why are people making such a big deal about the violence in this movie ? I seen it on CNN and the news anchor was making such a big deal about a violence in it. There are 1000's of movies with way more blood and violence in them !!

  • Hunter | January 9, 2012 2:57 PMReply

    What happened to production value?

  • urbanauteur | January 8, 2012 4:40 PMReply

    Toddlers, could be read as a linch-pin for societies ill's US -BoogieMen-Blackmen, but this troubled film is much more than a ABERRATION for some of these bourgie pathlogists & social wet dreamers, who dont see the forest beyond the trees, no matter how hard, cold or cruel dudes cinema hustle is, this paramount problem with KIDS should be GERMAINE to all of us ( it cant be without the other,no matter what some granola bar intellects say) Toddlers, should be read as a Bruce Lee-Iron Fist in conquering its eternal Parasitic Beast!(KILLER ILLITERACY)( i know for a fact, being a volunteer tutor, that these man-childs, to some degree, relish having some Grown Up(preferably a Man,in some instances) to teach,reach inside their wreched souls and conjole & sometimesbogart them into a somekind of self-respecting person whose self-worth,toil,vulnerablity is in safe keeping with our collective humility & unitied struggle in grasping books not glocks! even to the one's who espouse crocodile tears,but who constantly come back for old school discipline,aint lose one yet ;-).
    one of my favorite quo's i hang in my blackboard jungle:
    REVOLUTION START'S WITH THE MISFIT'S_ H.G.Wells

  • Ray | January 7, 2012 9:35 PMReply

    I respect your opinion Laura, I don't think we can get much of the "humanity" of the characters in Toddlers from this trailer, maybe there's more to it, I mean it's only a minute long, but I could be wrong! This isn't something I think I would see in theaters, but I would check it out on Netflix Instant, but if the story & characters suck, I wouldn't finish it. BUT, if it turns out to be good, I'm going to most def harass you to make sure you check it out ;) kidding, kidding!

  • sandra | January 7, 2012 2:59 PMReply

    That's not the Harlem I visited just two months ago. I won't support this project. I want to see black folks portrayed as humans. If you strive to keep it real, then your work will include balance. This was a pornographic trailer. I can get this for free when I watch mainstream media news.

    @LAURA I totally agree!

  • CareyCarey | January 7, 2012 3:26 AMReply

    DIS-INGENUOUSNESS has invaded this issue. Hide your grandbabies and clutch your pearls, another "hood porn flick" has been released on our poor suffering ignorant black youth. Well, another way to express my concerns over the recent comments/expressions of concern is that they seem to be self-serving and disingenuous. I mean, it's interesting that some folks are quick to speak FOR our youth in a tone - and with words - that clearly informs others that they themselves are not coming from a point of personal reference and experience, but as a condescending "adult" who has all the answers. They know exactly how troubled youth found themselves in their present predicaments (so they believe), although they've never walked in their shoes. They CAN NOT and WILL NOT talk from a reference point of someone who has fallen in the deep valley, wallowed in it, then came back to tell us how they fell in and more importantly, how they got out. Heck, it's easy to point fingers at filmmakers with a accusatory snarl on our face. However, if we take out any number of films that fall in this genre... would the world around our children change? I seriously doubt it. Plug the movies back in and then what happens? Conversation happens.

  • Ray | January 7, 2012 2:57 AMReply

    And the movie Kidz wasn't a "violent" movie per se, but it did have this one violent scene that's sad to watch, the skateboard scene where the teens jump this guy in the park after words were fired back & forth. This type of beating is similar to the 16 year old that was beat by a group of teens, and who later died in Chicago back in 2009, so again, you don't think this type of stuff happens all over America? Now I'm sure none of the Kidz that helped beat the kid in Chicago woke up thinking "hey we should beat a 16 year old to death with boards today, just like Telly & Casper's crew did the guy with the skateboards in the movie Kidz." http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYWIpbdjFl4&feature=related

  • CareyCarey | January 6, 2012 11:43 PMReply

    I am riding with Ray and Clayton on this one... and let me tell y'all why. First, as I've said many time, movies like this are a reflection of our society. They do not promote violence. Those who say such can not back those words with any concrete facts. In fact, since the images on the screen ARE a depiction of events past and present, I doubt any of the naysayers can usher in one gang-banger, murderer, hustler, con-man, pimp or ho, who would claim they started their life of crime after watching a movie. It's simply ridiculous and porous thinking to suggest such. Now, let me qualify my statement/opinion with a little facts of my own. I lived in an area/neighborhood in which 85 percent of the men went to the penitentiary... including myself. The reasons behind each of our downward spirals are multifaceted. Some didn't have a father at home, most did... I had both of my parents and none of my brothers went to jail. Violence? I've been shot and I have carried a gun. Education? Well, speaking for myself, I'll match mine against most who visit this board. Now, I've also worked in an industry in which I "saw" and worked with hundreds of victims and purveyors of violence, thugs and pushers and users... on a weekly basis. And, I am here to tell anyone with an open mind that movies of this nature have never been the leading force behind the predicaments of the aforementioned people. It never hit the table. In short, both Ray and Clayton supported their opinions with straight talk and facts. Yet, most of those who oppose this type of art seems to be letting their emotions fuel their words. I wonder if they watch ANY movies in which the grass isn't green or no one dies by the hands of another person? I also wonder if the naynay crowd watches any movies that promotes random sex? Come to think about it, is death the issue or are we talking about passing down "negative" messages to our youth? Huuummmm....

  • Laura | January 6, 2012 11:00 PMReply

    Ray, I am telling you the spots in which I work in are far worse. To my understanding this takes place in Harlem, the rapidly gentrifying Harlem, yeah that Harlem. I work in neighborhood far worse than Harlem. Yes and I grew up with kids like that to. I have lost count with how many people I grew up got strung up to crack, caught up in prostitution, the drug trade, killed, in prison, homeless, mental illness. But Ray tell me. When you were young sitting on the stoop, hanging out in the park, or whatever public place you and your friend ventured, this is what happened all day everyday out in the open? Gas masks....? Come on son... To me it is not as disturbing, as it is typical of adults who have no love and respect for our children and this is how they seem them. Soulless animals running around shooting and killing each other. I will venture to say this. Depraved humans like him would make sex films with if it was legal allowed in the states and idiot followers below like Clayton below would say ,"yo man he's keeping it real, kids be having sex"

  • Laura | January 7, 2012 8:13 PM

    My point Ray is that movies like City of God, Fresh and HBO series The Wire portrayed these characters as full fledge human beings. Not this piece of shit trailer above. It is porn. I have no issues with those films and the HBO series. The production value is shitty. The writing is shitty, direction is shitty. And this has nothing to do with how much money the film maker IT still would have been shitty if he had ten times the amount. Let me say this again. GAS MASK... come on, son. How can you defend GAS MASKS? But if your into that kind of porn. Well eat your heart out. It seems that they film maker found his market. And by the way sex is a subject matter also. You can tell a love story or you can do a skin flick. Some people rather see skin flicks. You know what I'm saying.

  • Ray | January 7, 2012 2:44 AM

    Nah Laura, I'm not saying this is what happened all day in the open, but I'm saying it does happen. I'm not denying the fact that you probably grew up in a rough area and saw some messed up stuff that most kids shouldn't have to see. I know people brought up movies like Kids, Fresh, City of God & let's not forget The Wire. There were characters depicted as young teen agers doing crimes that hurt your heart to even imagine someone doing, but that didn't make them any less of a human. They still joked with their friends, some had messed up family situations, some were just trying to carry on the legacy of their fathers that had street cred, but deep down the kid didn't but they wanted to portray that image. And let's not forget how Omar Little was killed in The Wire. As much as you want to pull for Omar, as many "Robin Hood" type murders he'd committed, he got knocked off by what seemed to be an 7 or 8 year old in The Wire. Did he do anything directly to that kid per se? NO. And in Fresh, really all he was about was making $, he didn't wanna be a killer, that wasn't his thing, in a way he didn't even seem like a bad kid, he just wanted to make money. His friend Chuckie though? He was in love with the "idea" of being a gangster. Remember him with the "I be busting those dope moves yo!f" As much as you wanted him to shut up and just be a good kid, he wouldn't, but that don't mean you didn't see his charisma and how funny he was as a kid. Remember the scene where the little girl that got shot & killed on the basketball court in Fresh, where the main character stayed there as she died and held her until she took her last breath? That could have different effects on different kids, to witness something like that. That's sad, does stuff like that happen everyday? Yes. Do you remember how that movie ended, when Fresh set the whole ending shootout up, and then sat on the hood of the car outside of the shop and watched all the shooting and killing go on, he was eating a freaking candy bar, knowing he masterminded the whole thing, he was only a kid, and inside people were being killed. That's what he had to do to protect his sister and get her out of the situation she was in. In Kids Telly was a smooth talking kid that you wanted to root for because he was just too slick, but he was still spreading HIV to other females, unknowingly. That's tough, and then sex scene, or "rape" in the party when all the kids are wasted, that's terrible. This stuff all happened out in the public's eye, some in the day, some at night, some behind closed doors, but it happened, it happened then and it happens today. I don't understand why the gas masks are such a hard concept to take in or why that's throwing you off. No one says this is how adults views today's youth, but this may be a small sampling of how SOME of today's youth is viewed. I gave all the examples from this movie only to say, no one says kids are soulless animals running around killing, they are young human beings, with emotions, you can see the character in all the kids from these movies. They're not animals, or just killing machines. For the most part they seem like normal kids, until they get in a situation and all the components of their environment comes down to "killed or be killed" and that's when the guns come out. When Fresh is playing that last chess game with Samuel L. Jackson, that's telling you there he's a kid that's seen a lot, and he's tired of it. That was a kid begging for help. Even in the movie Kids, it may have not been as violent, but it's still tough to watch, because those were kids doing all that stuff. I haven't said anything about the quality of acting in trailer, or how the quality of the film looks, I've only been speaking of the subject matter of does this stuff happen or does it not. So you're telling me that you don' t believe that kids shoot other kids in broad daylight in America? I never said it happens all day, but you're honestly saying that in the roughest places in America, kids don't kill other kids, just because they're out on the block in the daytime? Maybe the gas masks are throwing it off for you, but maybe ski masks would have been a better wardrobe choice? That's IF they even cover their faces. I think based on this trailer some may not like the acting or the cinematic feel, which is cool, but to say this movie is what desensitizes the youth, is just not accurate to me. No 10 year old is going to see this movie and say "hey you know what, I want to be gangster, I want to go kill someone, I want to live like that." as CareyCarey said, it's a multifaceted issue, it's very complex, and what some call a "poorly" acted, directed or designed film is not the blame. The production value is one thing, but the subject matter is an entirely different conversation.

  • Ray | January 6, 2012 9:34 PMReply

    Another hood film? Yes. Disturbing? Yes. But does that mean the guy can't make films like this? NO! It's easy for people to suggest what kind of film this guy could make to put a positive spin on it, and these "organizations" want to ban his shit, protest, and say why it shouldn't be viewed. How about the organizations do something to stop this vicious cycle of life that exist for the kids? If this guy does a "filmmaking course" to help a handful of kids in a NY neighborhood, that would be great! BUT... How many kids live like this in NY? How many kids grow up without proper parental guidance? It's NOT just his one film that's the problem. It's EVERYONE'S fucking problem. Sitting back, banning his film, protesting, or whatever else ain't gonna solve shit. Ok the term "keeping it real" makes some people mad. But at the end of the day, this shit DOES go on in NY, L.A., D.C., New Orleans, shit it's everywhere. So don't go saying this man's "hood film" isn't art because he's making one after all of the other one's have been viewed. Terrence Brown could say the same shit to the everyday Joe Blo or Jane Doe. What have YOU did to help a neighborhood kid that may be going down the wrong path? Say you're a lawyer by trade, have you sat down with some of the "bad" kids that may know your young sons & daughters, and tried to mentor them? Show them of all the possible career paths under the Judicial System? Maybe if you're a mechanic & you're tuning up your truck in the drive way, and the bad ass neighborhood kid walks by, you can call him over and show him how an engine works, just like you were showing our son. I'm in my late 20s now, and I can think of 2 guys now that are in prison that I grew up with. Somewhere around the 5h or 6th grade my Mom got a good grasp on me, but their parents didn't do so good with them, and you know what? My Mom forbid me to hang with them, if I did I was in trouble. She didn't want them in the house, didn't want them on our phones, or spending the night. But when you think about it, maybe some of those sleep overs she could have let them come over. Or maybe she could have let them come over for burgers and hot dogs on Birthdays? Maybe if she did, since they wasn't getting love at home, maybe she could have been an "extension" of a parent for them. Maybe she could have let them come over so she could help them with their homework, as she did with me. But she didn't. Is that the reason they're in prison? We'll never know if that led to it, but I'm optimistic, that if we ALL do what WE can to help out these kids we see going down the wrong path, then maybe it will turn out for the better. It's easy for everyone to point the finger, say this isn't art, or they're tired of the stereotypical messages in "black/brown" films, because the TOUGHER decision, is to go pick those 3 troubled kids up and take them to Church with you on Sundays, but instead you pass their house right up because you don't want them to shame your family. Remember that old proverb: "It takes a village to raise a child." So in conclusion, DON'T go blaming this film, or other films like it, START by looking in the mirror and seeing how YOU can fucking help, or how you can get other parents in the neighborhood to come together and you ALL help! That goes for ALL races, we're so desensitized towards raw human emotion and love that's it's downright shameful.

  • Cherish | January 6, 2012 11:03 PM

    Bullsh*t. Nobody here is claiming not to make this movie on this subject. People are telling the filmmakers to do a good job. This movie is crapola. Not just because of the topic because of how it's being depicted. And for all the kids who live this life - do you think this is what they need to see? You think this will help them feel better about their life and situation, to urge to get out of it? Bullsh*t again. You talk about de-sensitizing, that's exact effect movies like TODDLERS have on the masses . It de-sensitizes people to the raw violence that some people in our community faces because its so kiddiesh. Kiddie violence porn, as Laura killed it. Again, hustlers making a buck. Garbage in, garbage out.

  • Laura | January 6, 2012 10:05 PM

    Seems like a lot of guilt and anger coming from you, sir. You make the assumption that people who read this blog don't help in the community in their own way. That assumption is wrong on so many level. This is porn. Straight up porn. You can make a film about the violence that Black and Latino children go through everyday. (But if you do, hire me as a consultant, because I work with trouble youth all day everyday. You name it. Bloods, Crips, middle school age girls entering prostitution. A student who no longer go to school because he feels he has to take care of his schizophrenic mother who only speak spanish) I've seen it all.

    This film has no redeeming quality. Not because it does not have an answer. It is because these children have no recognizable human qualities. These kids have something in them that make them fully fledge human. They may never get their lives together, but they are still human. THE PRODUCTION OF THIS FILM IS SHITTY ON MANY LEVELS. Come on son... Gas masks? Kids shooting randomly every where. Shooting up in housing projects hallways as if its the norm. I assure you that I've never witnessed and experience that in the housing projects that I visit.. And I go around in these neighborhood by foot in the broad daylight via public transportation and I have been doing it for years. And I have worked in the neighborhood in which the film is set. And no its not like that. What pornography is to natural human expression this film is to trouble youth. I will say this in my years of working with trouble youth I have seen a population of Adult Black and Latino males (and females)have total disdain and contempt for our children. I should not be surprise that something like this would come out. This film is a manifestation of those adults view of our kids. It exploitation. But, hey, maybe Black and Latino children are the new "video ho's" of the millenium.

  • Laura | January 6, 2012 9:28 PMReply

    Hey Mom Look... It's kiddie violence porn.

  • Darkan | January 6, 2012 8:32 PMReply

    I don't see how anybody on this board can compare it to anything. It has the worst quality and acting ever and looks like pure horse manure. Smh.

  • Ghost | January 6, 2012 7:25 PMReply

    I'm sorry but it's time for this mess to stop. We have ENOUGH films that showcase Pookie and Ray Ray killing each other, we can watch the news and see Pookie and Ray Ray have killed Urkel, Tom or Chris and Menace 2 Society.

    We don't need another film like this. How about showing the boys in the hood that do make it without being thugs? What this director fails to realize is that there is no BALANCE in what our kids see from our race in the media.

    Nobody cares if this is "keeping it real". Stop showcasing the 30% that live like this. Show me the 70% that are making it.

  • RifRaf | January 6, 2012 12:23 PMReply

    Unless this were some documentary or something of *actual* kids that aren't characters simplified and drawn out into dialogue bits and glamorized pieces...this is pretty much just a lazy attempt at sensationalism and controversy. Please try and find a real compelling way to make a name for yourself.

  • Renoir422 | January 6, 2012 12:15 PMReply

    This is really about making a buck off the plight
    Of improvished Black youth. The level of artistry
    should match that of Kids or City of God,
    otherwise its exploitation. Just keeping it really
    real. I'll pass. A favela makes any PJs anywhere
    USA look like a palace.

  • Clayton | January 6, 2012 12:09 PMReply

    To all those mentioning the movie "Kidz," you can tell by the trailer that the only thing Toddler and Kidz have in common is the children. That's it. City of God? I see it. Kidz? No way.

  • mlm | January 6, 2012 3:52 PM

    Okay sure Kids wasn't violent that's because there wasn't as much violence back then. Both shot in New York the means streets of NY. Both centered on kids with no parental guidance. Both about kids having sex. City of God is a better comparison. Really it doesn't matter. right? ha I wanted to watch Kids when I was a kid b/c I didn't know kids were doing all that stuff. I def. think it will be kids watching this flick also.

  • Zeus | January 6, 2012 12:01 PMReply

    KIDS meets CITY OF GOD wannabe.

  • Clayton | January 6, 2012 11:54 AMReply

    Why are people trying to protest an artist expressing what he knows? We're advised to do so at the start of our filmmaking careers but reprimanded for doing it. Kids are killing kids in the NYC. Just a few months ago, a rising female basketball star at the high school I graduated (Bishop Loughlin) was gunned down in her housing projects in Harlem, mistaken for some dude that had beef with some other kids (http://youtu.be/kJmbJ09niI0). It used to be a lot worse when I was growing up in the scary 80's and early 90's, and if I ever told the stories I have come across over the years in Brooklyn, people would really be appalled (just listen to "Ready to Die" by Notorious B.I.G., Jay-Z's first album, Mobb Deep first album, etc.). Terrence Brown is telling these stories and when inspired I plan on doing the same, trying to maintain some social relevance in the telling and acknowledging the problem instead of acting like it doesn't exist. And if it happens to feature kids, which most of my stories from the 80's NYC do, then so be it. The reality existed and that will never change. Meanwhile, you have people wasting their time protesting this young auteur instead of using that effort to support other low-budget films they may prefer -- like mine ("Pro-Black Sheep" - the antithesis to Toddlers) that is also on the market and available for viewing.

  • BluTopaz | January 6, 2012 5:20 PM

    Dude already said the flick is just "entertainment" and there is no intended message. And he is NOT an "auteur" (God help us), he's a hustler with a camcorder and he probably brags about that. If you want to be a good filmmaker you need to learn the difference between glorifying violence, or creating a story arc where the main character experiences changes. The excellent movie Fresh is a good place for you to begin. Otherwise we can just watch the news to see niggaz shooting each other and innocent bystanders.

  • Cherish | January 6, 2012 1:20 PM

    This movie is not a documentary or social commentary on gang violence. It's a low-rent hood film, that's all. Who is the audience for this film? Who will most likely see this? Sociologists, educators, activists, parents who need to address the violence and make a difference? No, mostly the same kids and people who are in the middle of the sh*t anyway. And what will they get out of it? Not much other than justification and excuse for their ant-social behaviors. "They keepin' it real, son. That's real-life. That's how it is out in here."
    GTFOH. We've been through this sh*t before. These movies are a glorification of the violence and cesspool that urban neighborhoods have become. Stop rationalizing and justifying the existence of these movies, or at least be honest and call it what it is. This ain't art. These dudes are trying to capitalize off the misery that exist in their neighborhoods. Just another bunch of hustlers trying to make a profit.

  • T'challa | January 6, 2012 11:52 AMReply

    It's a straight to DVD movie, that probably would have gone unnoticed & ignored had they not decided to protest it. Haven't seen the film, but in principle the director has a right to make whatever he chooses. People have a right to either support or ignore it.

  • mlm | January 6, 2012 11:48 AMReply

    what's this like the black version of kids?

  • Mediagirl | January 6, 2012 11:42 AMReply

    I've reached the point where I'm tired of hearing about "keeping it real". The reality is that our children are dying and nothing is done to change or remedy the situation. Perhaps this filmmaker could volunteer his time and run a program for young children in digital film production or script writing. Maybe, after months of positive outcomes, he could then make a documentary about the positive changes his program brought to the same neighborhood youth depicted in this film. Wow, just imagine if we re-wrote the script for "keeping it real" to "re-defining our destiny".

  • jjstone | January 6, 2012 11:28 AMReply

    Young Black and Brown children are murdering each other. It is a sad-perverse reality. One that leaves me with a broken heart. If a filmmaker has a story to tell on this subject manner, I have no problem with that -- even if the images are disturbing and/or violent. I do have an issue with films that are poorly written and executed. Has anyone on the forum seen Toddlers?

  • Darkan | January 6, 2012 8:43 PM

    What you mean the trailer wasn't enough to tell you what it's about?

  • Clayton | January 6, 2012 12:06 PM

    You said it, JJSTONE.

  • David | January 6, 2012 11:15 AMReply

    Terrence Brown needs to keep his conscience real by maybe catching a screening of The Interrupters.

  • Nadell | January 6, 2012 10:52 AMReply

    DISTURBING to the highest degree!
    Although I'm sure this is reality in some cities but nonetheless it shouldn't be immortalized into a film. Yes, there have been movies such as New Jack City but these were grown folks -- I just can't take the kids/youngsters conducting themselves in this manner.

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