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Watch Dark Skinned Women Reveal Their Feelings On Race In "Dark Girl" Trailer

by Cynthia Reid
May 26, 2011 8:05 AM
29 Comments
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Here's a teaser trailer that's just started circulating on the web. Called Dark Girl, it's a documentary in the works exploring the deep seated attitudes and bias regarding dark skinned women. It's very telling and seems like a companion piece for the post "Do Fair-Skinned Black Actresses Accept Praise But Deliberately Avoid The Color Privilege Debate?" which you can check out HERE.

It's directed by Bill Duke and D. Channsin Berry.

Dark Girls: Preview from Bradinn French on Vimeo.

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29 Comments

  • KaSwiss | October 21, 2011 1:44 AMReply

    The song I wrote entitled Dark Skin Chicks tells my point of view. I love me and you! This is for all shades :)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvQZmNM-gvA

  • CareyCarey | May 30, 2011 12:51 PMReply

    @ Cynthia, No, it was my pleasure. In fact, since no one is probably reading this, I think it's time I give you a personal message, and request.

    See, as you mentioned, I've learned to tell on myself as a means to never forget my past. Some of us use others as a way to their riches, fortune and fame because, although pimping ain't easy, there appears to be no shortage of people raising their voices in the air, acting like they just don't care.


    In this game of life, there's strife, loves gone, past memories - he's there to lead the way. Bold stride, loud talk, he'll carry you through. It's not the tail you sell - you don't have to be a ho' - that's on you. Player or purveyor -- it's just a state of mind.

    And you know what, I don't know if you've ever posted your blog site, so we all can see what you're working with, so I am going to show you mine, with the hope that you'll have the courage to show me yours.

    No shake, no fake, no crying foul, just lay it on the line. I am asking because you can be a danderous woman, and not know it. As the readers will see (if they continue reading the rest of the comments) you make statements that are misleading, porous and simply not true, and then don't come back and clarify (cleanup) your err(mess), AND YOU'RE PROUD OF IT... look what you said..

    "As I told you before, I prefer to watch from the sidelines and let readers interact with each other"

    Yeah, you've said that AFTER you've opened a topic/post in which many have questioned it's purpose and significance. And then you run and hide, peek and deny.

    Cynthia, You're leaving empty messages on the floor, and you called my comments propaganda?! Yeah, that still has me scratching my head.

  • Monique | May 30, 2011 4:34 AMReply

    This topic is closed, unless you have something to add about the actual trailer.

    -Monique

  • CareyCarey | May 29, 2011 10:54 AMReply

    @ Cynthia, before I address the core of you comment, I have to go .....

    "[Carey] Perhaps Sergio can bring “it” up next time and you can jump on his bandwagon since you get “it” when he says it as you’ve stated in a previous post.

    Now Cynthia, as you said, we've had a few dust ups, but before we go too far, I might suggest that we be careful what we ask for. I don't know exactly what you were trying to imply by that statement (I got most of it), however, since you seem to get very defensive when some disagree with you, I don't believe you can accept a full and honest critic of Sergio's "peers".

    I don't always agree with Sergio (who agrees, all the time) but I've noted what I like about the way he does his thang. He sometimes runs on (in the podcast) but he never runs from the issue (whatever that may be), and it appears he enjoys and welcomes differing views. I can't say that for everyone. Some say that we need to talk about "it", as they, on the other hand, run from it, with "I don't want to debate it". Fear of not being like, and the fear of not saying the "popular" thang, does not impede his progress. Again, I can't say that for everyone.

    So please, when you reference Sergio, say it loud and say it clear, or I might think you're on some mess, that you might not be able to handle. As I said, HE speaks with confidence. Some speak from a platform of... am I saying the right things?

    Now, my next comment.....

  • CareyCarey | May 29, 2011 10:09 AMReply

    @ Cynthia,

    "So black women spend their time making shit up?! "

    Who in the hell said that? DAMN DAMN DAMN!

    Listen Cynthia, you can twist this all you want, and I've never said "this issue" is not an issue that does not need a discussion. You can do the white girl cry all you want, and some may see your plea to act like a victim, but all closed eyes are not sleep.

    Look, I am on the front lines of black women with all degrees of "issues" (serious issues) so please, you're preaching to the wrong choir. I'd venture to say that I've been face to face with 100 times more black women who are in serious storms, so again, miss me with your ambiguous cry. I see the pain, the struggle, the rewards and those that just talk a good game.

    So again, miss me with that one. My thang (in this discussion) has always been directed at how the "issues" are being discussed.

    You've said you read every comment, so you cannot deny that many move off point and become nothing but vents and moans, and crying "oh me". And as I've constantly said, that's cool for those that need that form of venting. But just to say we need to talk about "it", the "it" as I've repeated over and over, has to be defined. If not, there's no defined purpose, which could, and frequently does, lead to a ball of confusion. As witnessed by your comments. I am not going to question YOUR intelligence,

    So, lets do this again.....

    “Many of these ” racial” issues are brought to the table by women that simply love to gossip. Your reply: “Are you F*# kidding me? I was totally insulted by that then you go on to say… My reply: “My concern has always been the ways and means in which black American women voice their concerns on the subject. One cannot deny that it’s been a method (all their own) that lacks many fruitful results.”

    Your reply: "Again, are you kidding me?"

    Yeah, that's what I said and you cannot deny the truth. Define your issues (the "it" thing, you're referencing) and then bring back all the fruits from that labor.


    "Look, if you don’t understand just say so. Otherwise, you need to sit on the sidelines and LEARN A FEW THINGS!"

    Excuse me, I wonder who's really so entrenched in their own opinion, that nothing new can come in. I realize that 4 of the hardest things for humans to say are...

    I was wrong, I don't know, I am sorry, and, I love you. So I understand your propensity to cloud the issue and/or not address the real issues of my concern.

    So let's make this clear, ONE MORE DAMN TIME

    Carey said: …“Those of us that believe much of the “discussion” and “banter” we frequently witness from black American women on the color issue, lacks substance. period.”

    Your reply: Wow…just wow. So black women spend their time making shit up?!"


    Yeah WOW! WTH are you talking about now?!

    See, there you go again, talking in circles. Making WHAT shit up? Yeah, let's talk about lacking substance. Thanks for making my point. Geeez...

    But maybe, just maybe, our differences can be found in the words "WE" need to talk about "it". Look, I don't know who in the hell "WE" is/are? When "we" is not defined, and the issue is not defined, "WE" are not heading in the right direction, and therefore, "we" will never know when we've arrived, cuz we don't know where in the hell we're going , and who's invited to the party. That's MY major point of contention.

    You can cry all you want. Talk in ambiguous terms - all you want, and it may impress some, but not me. And please, lets not talk about intelligence (even in a snide way) a person has to bring some, to get some.

    You have to know that when you post something for the world to read, YOU have taken on the responsibility to be as concise as you can. Granted, it's basically impossible to cover all your back doors, however, you have to understand that many are going ask questions, It might behoove you to do the same thing, before you make rash and porous statements. You're talking to the world, and others may have a different view, and better view than you.

    Yeah, back at-cha.... "Otherwise, you need to sit on the sidelines and LEARN A FEW THINGS!

    Practice what you preach.

  • Cynthia | May 29, 2011 9:35 AMReply

    Once again...thanks for putting yourself on BLAST and saving me the time. Your words, and your very visible chauvinistic attitude, speak volumes!

  • CareyCarey | May 29, 2011 7:35 AMReply

    My dear Cynthia, let me wipe the tears from my eyes as you continue to shift the issue, and/ or feign ignorance.

    Look, maybe i did not make myself clear with the following statement..

    "I’d venture to say that I’ve been face to face with 100 times more black women who are in serious storms, so again, miss me with your ambiguous cry. I see the pain, the struggle, the rewards and those that just talk a good game"

    See, I left out the words "than you". Smug you say? No, it's what I actually do in my day job. When I said I am on the front lines, I actually am. I see hundreds of women, from the battered and the abused, racially mixed, and those dealing with drug and alcohol problems. .. on a daily bases. So please, I can talk about the finer points of constructive arguments-debate- discourse-discussions, etc. concerning women of color. Can you? Show me your rewards and the finer point on how YOU believe the issue should be approached. But wait, you're whole argument is "WE SHOULD TALK ABOUT IT". Yeah, again I say, with whom, when, where, how, what forum, and what's the central topic of discussion. If those finer points are not addressed, the discussion can be fruitless, and turn into a gossip fest.

    So please Cynthia, you can persist on making small tangent points, but I am sure you understand what I am saying. As I said, this is what I do, so it goes without saying that I also see (on a regular basis) those just like you, that live in denial, and always seem to cloud the issue when the fingers are pointing directly at them. It's deflection 101.

    Consequently, when you said something as baseless and completely off point as the following, I instantly knew you were simply trying to make an argument and point, all your own. Look at this...

    [who] would allow someone to say or write that “racism is not real, never was and black people just use it to gossip” and then act as if that’s a statement meant to be taken serious and “debated.”

    WTF?! Now Cynthia, either you're fooling yourself, or you think you're speaking to a room full of fools. Racism is not real? Who in the hell said that... but you. My god, you're becoming more and more "questionable".

    However, like you, I see this as a win-win situation. Others can look at how you tried to deflect the issues and make statements (assigning them to me) and then argue against that point( your own self serving point). Woman, you're fooling yourself if you believe others couldn't see through that. I'd venture to say you've lost a few props in your attempt to run from the truth. But maybe, just maybe, you truely do not understand the need nor purpose of defining exactly what the "It" ( the issue) is, before you can begin to address it.

    Anyway, through our exchange, it's my hope that all young ladies that find themselves in a struggle, has learned how NOTto approach the issue, and be fully aware of the dog that brought the bone. Just because they say "it's" right, does not mean it's so(true). Ask them which way are they going, and why? If they say "we need to talk about something" ask them if they meant to say, "THEY need to talk about it". And then, ask them to define the mission.

    Bring some game and something you know, and not, cry me a river. I see that every day.

    Yep, there's more work to do, move out of your own way. You're stagnating your own growth by feigning ignorance, and letting your pride get in your way. For whom does the bell toll- really?

    baseless propaganda? Oh no, here you go again. I see you love laying your ladder on the wrong roof and mistakinly believing others will follow you. Geez..... school yard politics, 101, and the white girl cry( pity po me and shame on the big black wolf) seldom works around black folks. We've seen that pity party a million times.

    I bid you adieu. School is out. See you later alligator.

  • Cynthia | May 29, 2011 5:56 AMReply

    Alright...first this annoyed me. Now I can only laugh. You say I speak in ambiguous terms yet, based on responses, everyone else understood completely. Then, somehow, you don't know what "it" is but you seem to get "it" when you want to write a five paragraph response? Contradictions Carey.

    And just so you know, there are many comments people make that I completely disagree. As I told you before, I prefer to watch from the sidelines and let readers interact with each other. However, if you say something that's beyond derogatory and attempt to use these boards as a platform for baseless propaganda and think YOU won't be challenged...think again.

    What you said about black women was insulting...period. I don't care how you try to TWIST your own words, the end result was the same. And it had nothing to do with being a hardy debate.

    I doubt you or any other reader of S&A would allow someone to say or write that "racism is not real, never was and black people just use it to gossip" and then act as if that's a statement meant to be taken serious and "debated." Please.

    My point in bringing up Sergio is that, again, you're full of contradictions. When he expresses talking about "it" on the podcast, you fully agree. When I say talk about "it" you seem to get selective amnesia.

    Lastly, your statement..."I’d venture to say that I’ve been face to face with 100 times more black women who are in serious storms" is full of smug, dismissiveness that makes this issue one that has prevailed and will continue if people decide to belittle it. We all know you can't change what you don't acknowledge.

    Ultimately, we don't agree and we can leave it at that but I do owe you a "thank you" because, in displaying your words and mentality, people can see that more progress and education is needed regarding this situation. And truthfully, we have a lot more work to do.

  • Cynthia | May 29, 2011 3:03 AMReply

    @Vanessa and @Carey...I'm sorry that you thing this is some "cry me a river" bullshit because it's not. Might I suggest that you READ what women have said below, and on other blog sites as well, before you make such despicable, dismissive statements. Better yet, ask a few black women in your personal life.

    @Carey...You and I have had our "run-ins" in the past but you scraped the bottom of the barrel by saying...
    "Many of these ” racial” issues are brought to the table by women that simply love to gossip. "

    Are you F*# kidding me? I was totally insulted by that then you go on to say..."My concern has always been the ways and means in which black American women voice their concerns on the subject. One cannot deny that it’s been a method (all their own) that lacks many fruitful results."

    Again, are you kidding me? Look, if you don't understand just say so. Otherwise, you need to sit on the sidelines and LEARN A FEW THINGS! And people wonder why women don't report rapes and molestations...ha!

    Even if I couldn't relate to these women, I would NEVER INVALIDATE another persons experience which you seem to do so swiftly and carelessly.

    If you only knew how many conversations I've encountered since the release of this trailer, you would be shocked to know how many women have "a story." And yes...most women have some kind of story. Whether they decide to tell you or not is what you should be thinking about.

    And finally, this statement you make tops it all..."Those of us that believe much of the “discussion” and “banter” we frequently witness from black American women on the color issue, lacks substance. period."

    Wow...just wow. So black women spend their time making shit up?! I thought you were more intelligent than that Carey.

    My only regret...I should have tackled this much sooner.

    Perhaps Sergio can bring "it" up next time and you can jump on his bandwagon since you get "it" when he says it as you've stated in a previous post.

  • CareyCarey | May 28, 2011 12:34 PMReply

    Since this is a discussion board, I can safely assume all conversations are welcome, and warranted. I mean, if the goal is to examine an issue from all angles, every leaf and evry angle has to be explored.

    Having said that, within this single tread, several issues have risen to the surface.

    I would suggest a person pick their poison. If something hits a personal cord, speak on it. It’s always nice for a person to show their hands and not speak in an ambiguous why, as if we are speaking over someone’s head.

    Now, I have continued to say that talking about an issue is possibly a great thang to do. But again, if the “issue” is not defined, and thus, has no defined purpose, direction, goal or parameters, the mission of talking about “IT” can be a fruitless effort.

    “Considering Bill Dukes directed it, I would think that he feels the subject is worthy of reflecting on. Or is he (as CareyCarey stated), “Clicking and Clacking” too?”

    And? I mean, Bill Dukes is a director, and? He felt it was a worthy subject to reflect on... AND? The Birth of a Nation (originally called The Clansman) is a 1915 movie, directed by D W Griffin.

    And come on... the following is not remotely related, or connected to this discussion.


    “Should we refrain from talking about the genocides in Rwanda and Sudan, not to mention the ongoing struggles of the Sudanese because Jewish people faced a similar genocide during War War II and their own ongoing struggles?”

    Surely you threw that in there for sh*ts and giggles. Those of us that believe much of the “discussion” and “banter” we frequently witness from black American women on the color issue, lacks substance. period. To equate the wars and struggles in Africa and the Jewish genocide, to “THIS” issue, is simply ridiculous.

    “who knows but to pretend it {intra-racism amongst black people across the disapora}
    doesn’t exist and that it only exists amongst black women (particularly African-American) is categorically false and misleading. I would even go so far as to say it is pure fiction”

    And who said it didn’t? My concern has always been the ways and means in which black American women voice their concerns on the subject. One cannot deny that it’s been a method (all their own) that lacks many fruitful results.

    If the discussion (“it“), the issue is designed as a form of catharsis, fine, do your thang, cry your eyes out.

  • CareyCarey | May 28, 2011 11:56 AMReply

    Wait, before you read my following comment, I have to throw this on the fire to get this party really started. I found this particular point of interest over at a sister tread...

    Reg Said: "i have a question: who expect, or even WANTS, these actors to talk about this? unless they were specifically asked about it (an interview that would strike me as rather rude, at minimum), why would they ever address it? why would their opinion on such issues even be of particular interest? they’re PERFORMERS!! not intellectuals, much less sociologists or cultural anthropologists. i certainly wouldn’t expect angelina jolie, gwyneth paltrow, jennifer anniston (or any of brad’s other paramours) to go out and address the prejudice against, say, fat/overweight actresses (not that being fat is the same as being dark-skinned, but i hope you see my point). why should they? and who would care about THEIR opinion, if they ventured it, more than ANYONE ELSE’S? so, do “fair-skinned” actresses “deliberately avoid” the “debate?” who knows? but, if they do, it’s probably because they wisely realize they have nothing of particular interest to add"

    Oh boy, Reg brought the real thang. Now my comments follow,and do excuse ALL the misspelled words. Don't let that get in the way of the central message of "Black women need to look in the mirror to find the real answers and real issue"


    Alright now... keeping on reading..... if you dare *smile* and *eyebrow raised_

  • CareyCarey | May 28, 2011 11:39 AMReply

    Venessa said: "Black men were slaves too, they can be dark, but you don’t see them crying a river. UGH"


    UT OOH! Now we're talking about the real issue. Did I hear the thruth raise it's heart pounding head. Many of these " racial" issues are brpought to the table by women that simply love to gossip.

    We seldom see our black male actor crying and pointing fingers at their contemparies.

    Some of our leading male actors are taken to the woodshed (by mostly women) when they try to tell us to concentrate on real issues. Can I say Morgan Freeman. He said "get over that shit" and lord have mercy, you would have thought the sky was falling down.

    Ladies ladies ladies, follow the lead of the black man, then y'all might find some piece in the MOANing.

    Clickin' and Clackin', talking about her skin and their skin, ain't gonna get you nothing except dried wrinkled skin. Then of course, we'll probably her the other dead cry of "There ain't enough good black men to go around".

    And then we'll respond as we always do... "to get a do right man, you gotta be a do right woman", that stays in her lane, and don't bring us no bad news.

    So, I believe the real issue is black women that need to tell ( and show) their daughters how to recognize game and mess, and run from that sh*t like it's the plaque.

    Jealousy, envy, and gossip, is a mean game.

  • JMac | May 28, 2011 9:59 AMReply

    Well said Monique.

    I loove how all of a sudden dark skin/colorism issues are a female problem -as if black men don't perpetuate it or haven't suffered from it. You don't see black men crying about it? Since when do men cry about or talk openly about anything that deeply affects them emotionally? That's a woman's domain. Women internalize pain and let it eat them alive. Men lash out to make everyone else feel their pain. If you think a documentary couldn't be made with dark black men lamenting over their skin color, you really are oblivious.

    The only instances any man has ever physically hit me were by dark skinned men who were kind enough to explain I deserved it for being too damn light or not "black" enough in personality. I guess they were just black women stuck inside black male bodies. Poor little things.

    Also love how some people think if you just tell your daughter she's beautiful, she won't suffer from these issues. Stacie is right - this ish runs deep. My niece was fortunately born during a time where the only shows she watched were The Proud Family, That's so Raven, Sister Sister et al. She wouldn't watch shows with no black leads. She only played with black dolls because "they were prettier than the white ones." So why the hell did this black militant girl at the tender age 6 barge into our house after school proclaiming, "When I grow up I'm gonna marry a white man because all black men are ugly, stupid and poor?" We didn't teach her that. It wasn't from tv. It wasn't in her home environment. I argued with her for 30 minutes on how wrong she was but she was 100% convinced that all black men suck... esp. the dark ones. Eventually she grew out of that mentality but how did those thoughts even get there? Obviously this problem isn't that simple to resolve much less prevent.

    I know it hurts to have a mirror put up to you to see how ugly you really are but you need to deal with it, become aware of it, recognize it, and stop it. Stop pretending as if it's not important or not a problem because it makes you uncomfortable or embarrassed to see the pain these women have experienced at the hands of their own "proud" ( HA! ) race and often their own family members. You get over that if you can.

    Frankly, I could say that the belief Black people outside the US have the ability to economically uplift themselves would be a much more hilarious conversation than this documentary... but I wouldn't want to hurt anyone's feelings.

  • Monique | May 28, 2011 7:03 AMReply

    I'm not here to chastise anyone over their opinions but I wanted to chime in on a few things...

    I think some of you totally missed the point of the documentary. Considering Bill Dukes directed it, I would think that he feels the subject is worthy of reflecting on. Or is he (as CareyCarey stated), "Clicking and Clacking" too?

    Sharing experiences and thoughts on one particular subject does not invalidate another. I've also found that comparing one circumstance or experience against another can often times be pointless. There are too many factors to be weighed for their to be an even measure. This isn't the angst nor oppression Olympics.

    For instance: Should black people across the diaspora stop talking about injustices and challenges they face within their respective countries because there happens/has happened to be similar issues faced by other racial groups in other countries?

    Should we refrain from talking about the genocides in Rwanda and Sudan, not to mention the ongoing struggles of the Sudanese because Jewish people faced a similar genocide during War War II and their own ongoing struggles?

    I think that if you asked most reasonably forward thinking people, they would say no. One doesn't invalidate the other. Everyone should have a chance to express themselves and share their stories. It helps us to learn and grow as individuals and a people.

    So there continues to be intra-racism amongst black people across the disapora and I say 'across' because it it true. It's not only happening in the U.S. but across the globe (see the Dominican Republic, Brazil, England, Cuba, Puerto Rico...the list goes on). And it's not only black people, a few minutes of research will lead you too a plethora of academic and personal stories about intra-racism/ colorism amongst other ethnic groups in the Phillipines, India, New Zealand even up and down the African Coast. We can say it stems from the legacy of Colonialism or another reason -- who knows but to pretend it doesn't exist and that it only exists amongst black women (particularly African-American) is categorically false and misleading. I would even go so far as to say it is pure fiction.

    To me, dismissing and laughing off someone's painful experiences simply because I haven't had them or can't relate would be very unfortunate. I thank Cynthia for all the work put into writing about this film and these particular issues that may (or may not exist) in Hollywood. I've spoken with her privately and although she may not have faced the same challenges in her own life as the women in this film, I have in some ways. I was not willing to share my experiences in a public forum nor debate them. She, on the hand noticed and questioned these things -- that she was brave enough to start a dialogue on this subject knowing how some folks would react to it -- well, that's to be commended, at least from my point of view.

  • Vanessa | May 28, 2011 6:57 AMReply

    This is ridiculous. How can we create all this hate?? If we just start to accept ourselves this wouldn't be a huge issue. And notice this is ONLY black women....Black men were slaves too, they can be dark, but you don't see them crying a river. UGH.

  • Nadell | May 27, 2011 5:19 AMReply

    This whole constant debate, battle and issue is emotionally draining. The great skin-tone divide angers me. It's never ending and unfortunately it will never end. And what is absolutely ridiculous and down-right shameful is the fact that we do it to ourselves. NO, it was not established by us but it continues through us. We've become the very vessels of this continued war.

  • NothingButAMan | May 27, 2011 3:48 AMReply

    This whole situation is pathetic to me. We really have nothing else more pressing to discuss than who among us is considered "pretty" and how and why? If I ever have daughters, I wouldn't allow them to be so concerned with "pretty" in the first place...

  • Laura | May 27, 2011 2:51 AMReply

    Let me share two things. First I learned earlier age that it was beneficial be brown skin; not dark skin nor light skin. This was because brown skin girls were exempt from the colorism attacks. Brown skin girls for the most part were neutral grounds. We may have done the attacking but we were rarely the target.

    I saw that first hand. Both my parents were Black American. My mother looked Latina and my father was dark skin. All eight of us kids were from light to dark. I saw how relatives treated us based skin color/good hair.

    I saw how my light skin sisters/brothers and my darker skin sister/brothers were treated differently by all kinds of folks: white, black, latino, asian, caribbean. You name it. I grew up being grateful that I was that brown invisible skin color. For better or for worse, that's how I felt.

    Also, about 5 years ago. My daughter and I were in the neighborhood park playing. My daughter is light skinned, reasonably lighter than my self. She was 9 years old at the time.

    Some girls from the neighboring public housing played along my daughter as well as other girls in the park. They were the same age as her. Their playing turned rough and very mean spirited. My daughter decided she did not want to play anymore.

    I tried to make a life lesson out of the situation. I asked her "do you know they played that way". Her answer: "because they are dark skin and they're not smart. Needless to say I was floored. It was a life lesson for me. That was not something I taught my daughter, but some how at 9 she internalize concept that dark skin is associated with negativity.

    I had to correct her. I say this to point out that this colorism is in us but it is also all around us. It is reinforced reiterated inside various black communities and outside of it.

  • Melissa | May 27, 2011 1:29 AMReply

    I am a 'brownskinned' african woman (am I dark/light I dunno...never been discussed) and I find this all hilarious. maybe I wouldn't find it as funny if I grew up in America but still...

    Anyways, hope they get over it because there are more pressing issues in the world like the economy of Black people around the globe.

  • Stacie | May 26, 2011 12:49 PMReply

    The surprising thing is that this mentality is still being spread to our children. I work as a substitute teacher in the public school systems and I have heard high school kids on down to elementary school kids make negative comments about dark skin and nappy hair. I have heard high school girls talk about how they wouldn't want to have a daughter with a dark complexion but it would be ok for their son to be dark.

    I think that it needs to be discussed and people need to realize that saying these things in front of their children is harmful. They will think twice, if they know better. They just don't honestly know better.

    Just because you are conscious now does not mean everyone else is too. I regret that I did not stop those high school girls and tell them how wrong their attitudes are but I have made an effort since then to try to change children's attitudes about their own skin and hair.

    Parents also need to realize how much other kids can influence their children's beliefs and ideals. I just recently was in a situation where a college kids said that he preferred light over dark skinned girls, right in front of his dark skinned mother. She was shocked. He didn't learn that at home. He learned it from his outside environment.

  • AfroStyling | May 26, 2011 12:14 PMReply

    How can they get over it if people keep telling them to get over it? If its something that needs to be discussed (and it obviously is) then it should be discussed. Glossing over it will only worsen the situation.

  • Kia | May 26, 2011 11:47 AMReply

    Interesting and not at all surprising it's an issue that won't go away. How can it, when mostly every faucet in this country (in the world) seems to suggest "black" as negative connotation.

  • Joe | May 26, 2011 11:47 AMReply

    Yes, these sistas have serious repressive childhood memories certainly not to be taken lightly. If you have dark skin just deal with it reminds me when white folks say slavery is past-get over it. I'd like Brother Bill to document the degree of discrimination light skinned women face. Lastly, black sho is beautiful. Sadly, many black folks don't subscribe to that.

  • Lynn | May 26, 2011 10:40 AMReply

    First off, these women have serious repressive childhood memories. If you are dark skin just deal with it. I mean even if you bleach your skin you are still Black. What are they escaping from?

    People act like light skin women don't face the same amount of discrimination as dark skin women. At the end of the day we are all Black. Regardless of skin pigment shades we are Black.

  • Zeus | May 26, 2011 10:33 AMReply

    With all the things black folk have to face, you have to be a special kind of a stupid asshole to still have hang ups about other black folk being too dark or too light. Especially if you are another black person.


    Viola Davis is a gorgeous sista and I hate how Hollywood insists on making her HIDE her beauty.

  • lee | May 26, 2011 10:17 AMReply

    This saddens me to the core. I am ashamed at how far behind we are as a race. Shameful. We should not get mad at other races if they look down on us because we don't even love ourselves.

  • Fefe | May 26, 2011 9:27 AMReply

    thank you.

  • KikiDee | May 26, 2011 9:24 AMReply

    Just heartbreaking! Especially the little girl's belief that light is all right! Unfortunately, it starts that early. I've seen and experienced all the things these ladies talk about throughout my childhood. It takes a long time and a lot of work to LOVE yourself! Hopefully, to those who see this film, will start us ALL on the road to healing and loving ourselves.

  • JMac | May 26, 2011 8:51 AMReply

    Oh, Cynthia you've done it now. Prepare to duck!

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