Watch Now: Trailer for "Dear Daddy" Documentary About Fatherless Young Women

by Vanessa Martinez
August 23, 2011 6:51 AM
19 Comments
  • |

Thanks to S&A regular reader CareyCarey for bringing this to my attention. The feature-length documentary Dear Daddy by Janks Morton is currently raising funds through THIS Indiegogo campaign. The film has raised $8,227 of the $6,000 goal with 24 days left.

The moving documentary deals with the "life long effects of fatherlessness on women. The film follows the dramatic journeys of eight young women from the tough city streets of Washington, DC as they struggle to overcome poverty, poor educational systems, no healthcare, and the most difficult life circumstance they have been dealt... the absence of their fathers.


Dear Daddy is not only about the struggles to survive and navigate as a young woman of color, but at its core, it’s about the importance of a father's role in the lives of their daughters."

Take a look at the trailer.

  • |

More: Trailer , Watch Now, Fundraising

You might also like:
Free Indie Movies and Documentaries    

19 Comments

  • CareyCarey | August 25, 2011 9:23 AMReply

    Standing At The Scratchline... one of my favorite books. He also did a followup... can't remember it's name. But if Sergio's dad is anything like King Tramain (the protagonist) his daddy was a bad mofo and a killer of gangsters, southern rednecks and Germans.

  • urbanauteur | August 25, 2011 8:53 AMReply

    @Sergio, your Father's Story is Already a book!, via Standing at the Scrachline, written by poet-Maya Angelou's son., forgot his first name but his last is johnson and maybe you should reconsider and write that bad boy like Tamara suggested..i'm just saying:)

  • Vanessa Martinez | August 24, 2011 11:59 AMReply

    @Sergio and Carey Carey

    Thank you for sharing. This is an important and sore topic for many. Unfortunately, the lack of parenting of some/many men gives black men in general a bad rap.

    But like you said Sergio "They didn’t brag about it, they just did it." It's not about "I'm a good father because I make sure they have everything." Just be a FATHER. That's your blood, it is your responsibility and duty as a man. Also, you do it out of LOVE for your own.

  • Sergio | August 24, 2011 11:34 AMReply

    I've got to get this off my chest but my father was of the generation of what I call "the last real true men". He grew up during the Great Depression, fought in the hellhole of the Pacific during World War II, black men like him knew they had the responsibility to "uplift the race" And that also meant raising and taking care of a family. They didn't brag about it, they just did it. That was their job. Not all of them were perfect or even made good fathers, the vast majority of them knew they had duty to advance black people and they did it

    But then something happened. Generation of black men after my father have become, by and large, weak, spoiled, self centered eunuchs. So weak that when a taxi cab doesn't stop to pick them up they have a nervous breakdown. You think your life is hard, try surviving as a black man in this country 50, 60, 70, 80 years ago. You wouldn't have survived a day. Find out you're going to be a father and you run for the hills. Children growing today without a father is the result of black men losing their balls.

  • Sergio | August 24, 2011 9:01 AMReply

    My father would have been the last one who would have wanted to see a movie or book on his life. Like I said he did his job and was never looking for any compliments. And he also felt, no doubt, that what he did wasn't that remarkable since there were millions of other black men of his generation like him who did similar things. That is to raise your family and try to make the world just a little bit better

    The fact that you think he was unique only goes to prove my point again that too many black men nowadays have become soft, spoiled, superficial and weak

  • CareyCarey | August 24, 2011 8:55 AMReply

    Oh,, I forgot, in the next comment I forgot to mention something. There's a link to an article I wrote for a blog on co-parenting, which relates to Vanessa's post.. The Blog's host goes by Deesha. Well, as we were doing our thang, she said, "Btw, did you know that Tambay, founder of Shadow and Act, is my brother from another mother? Small world. I've known Tambay since 2003. maybe even 2002. I adopted him as my baby brother... no matter that he’s over 6 ft tall"

    Yeah, small world. Deesha once posted a request for submissions on a subject realted to The Wire (series). Well, she was my mentor and stand in editor. Anyway, at deadline they didn't have enough submiisions so they closed it down. I sure was glad b/c my stuff stunk like horse doo-doo and I knew it. They saved me the embarrassment of being rejected.

  • CareyCarey | August 24, 2011 8:00 AMReply

    "To Carey, thank you for sharing your story, as well. It reads like a story. A memoir, even. I’m so glad you brought to our attention this doc" ~Tamara

    **Carey is now peaking around the corner looking for Mr. or Mrs. Truth who said, "Carey will type anything for a reaction. He brings nothing to our debates except attention whoring, mindless babble. He’s a nut job, and idiot, at best **

    Tamara, have you been talking with my lady? I am also a public speaker whose audience is generally youth and those experiencing drug and alcohol problems. I tell my stories and of course I write many of them down, posting them on my blog and other outlets. My motivation is to inspire others to look within to see how they can relate to my struggles (which are many) and then consider what they can change about themselves.

    Now, my lady has been on my back about putting my life's journey/struggles/indiscretions in a book or memoir format. In fact, just today she handed me a paper and told me to fill it in. The lines are titled... Subject-Title-Author-Bio-Description. See, she has taken it upon herself to begin the process of compiling all my "stories" (400 or more) and do the thang by herself.

    Now I don't know about that b/c when she starts digging around in my past life, she is going to start asking me too many damn questions like, "you did what, with whom where and why, tell me all the details and how that worked for you". And TamTam, I can't do that. A man has to keep some things in his back pocket.

    So Tamara, in short, I know we do the hi-jack thang, but don't be encouraging my lady or I'll have to cut ya. *lol*

    Here's a story that she knows about. It's called Baby Momma Drama -One Two and Three. I was a very bad boy and one woman pulled a gun on me while my son, by another woman, was standing at my side.

    Momma Drama here http://careycarey-carrymehome.blogspot.com/2010/09/babies-momma-drama-one-two-and-three.html

  • Tamara | August 24, 2011 6:50 AMReply

    I’ve got to get this off my chest but my father was of the generation of what I call “the last real true men”. He grew up during the Great Depression, fought in the hellhole of the Pacific during World War II...

    and

    I should have also added that my father was a college graduate and spent 30 years on the Chicago Police Force working the gang unit, the toughest dept there was, and spoke five languages (which is very necessary if you’‘re Chicago cop) Like I said one of the “last real true black men”. And he wasn’t all that unusual for men of his generation.

    Where can I view this movie or read this book? There's gold in them thar paragraphs! Fodder for some good fiction! Only it's real; a creative non-fiction tour-de-force! Sergio thanks for sharing.

    And to Lori, I'm with you 100% with Our children need both parents in their lives. I mean, that's the rub, the gist, the benediction! Kids need both their parents. Those two influences are so crucial, I agree.

    To Carey, thank you for sharing your story, as well. It reads like a story. A memoir, even. I'm so glad you brought to our attention this doc.

  • JMac | August 24, 2011 5:27 AMReply

    Without going into too much detail, I'll just say for the most part we have friction because we're too similar. Both stubborn. Both unable to back down from an argument. Both smart asses. Both want to be in complete, unquestioned control. We got along very well when I was a minor but now that I'm adult with my own opinions, it's best to just stay away.

    And then there's the effects of his Alabama upbringing. Now that he's older, he is a very irritable, disagreeable man - not that he was always Mr. Happy before. He charms the pants off of everyone outside the home but at home he diverts his anger and frustration on the family. Cause of the anger/frustration - dealing with real racism, expecting more out of life and realizing it's not going to happen or wouldn't have happened because he belonged to the wrong generation (or the wrong race).

    When the whole Jeremiah Wright thing blew up, I laughed at white people's shocked reaction. They just don't know.

  • CareyCarey | August 24, 2011 4:17 AMReply

    I can relate to Sergio's sentiments about his father and past generations.

    I think it's safe to assume Sergio's father and my father were born within 10 years of each other. When one speaks about responsibility and sacrific, it was my father who told me to leave his home and go raise my family when I was only a teenager. He said there will not be any fatherless children in this family. As I mentioned, I never saw my father cry, and for the most part, I never saw him complain. In fact, I can’t even remember him and my mother having a major argument. He just did what he had to do. For him, it was about pulling up his slacks and doing the damn thang. He didn’t even buy a car until all the children was gone from his home.

    On another note, back then, although he wasn’t allowed to swim in the city’s pool, he seldom voiced concerns about white folks. Another example of simply doing what he had to do in spite of the challenges he faced.

    My father died at a young age, 53. Even though I was grown, it left a huge void in my life. I cannot image what it must be like for young women to be raised without their fathers.

    Thanks again Vanessa, this is a great topic that needs conversations like this. I can see a deep soul-searching movie (with a black cast of course) that would kill this subject... with the right director. I wonder how many people, black men in particular, would accept it, without crying that it was simply beating up on "black men"? Hey, my momma says, "you gotta get that ass where they do their dirt and let the crying begin"

    “Generation of black men after my father have become, by and large, weak, spoiled, self centered eunuchs. Children growing today without a father is the result of black men losing their balls” ~ Sergio

    I’m laughing but it might be so true.

    “Got my crying up in here and appreciating my Dad on a day I really want to dislike him”
    ~ JMac

    Those words reminded me of my first days in the military. I was very naive. When I heard other soldiers say they hated their father, I couldn’t understand how that could be. I wonder if JMac would share a little more?

  • Vanessa Martinez | August 24, 2011 2:04 AMReply

    Indeed a tearjerker. Yes, I shed tears watching the trailer. :'-(

  • JMac | August 24, 2011 1:58 AMReply

    Damn Carey!!! Got my crying up in here and appreciating my Dad on a day I really want to dislike him.

    Really interested in seeing them confront the dad.

  • Sergio | August 24, 2011 1:34 AMReply

    I should have also added that my father was a college graduate and spent 30 years on the Chicago Police Force working the gang unit, the toughest dept there was, and spoke five languages (which is very necessary if you''re Chicago cop) Like I said one of the "last real true black men". And he wasn't all that unusual for men of his generation.

  • Tamara | August 23, 2011 10:59 AMReply

    Wow. The tears are comin'.

    Carey and 'Nessa done made me cry. Boo, on the both of you! Boo!

    And THANK YOU. I look forward to watching this. :-) Had to sneak and watch this trailer. Still at work. But S&A is on the ball today with the good stuff! Loving it.

  • CareyCarey | August 23, 2011 10:49 AMReply

    Hello Lori Jones Gibbs, you said: "often times the daughter was used by the mother and kept away from the father. Unfortunately, the daughter is told by the mother in some cases that her father didn’t want to be apart of her life and only sometimes provided financial support. Let’s stop the divorcing of our children"

    You sure said to say and what's right. In fact, there's a website that addresses that very issue; the responsibility and difficulties of both parents when divorce create a divide. Their home page says, Divorce Ends Marriages…But Families Endure.

    Co-parenting 101 @ http://coparenting101.org/

  • Lori Jones Gibbs | August 23, 2011 9:24 AMReply

    Thank you for this excellent trailer. I will definitely support this conversation. As the author of Yes, I Would Marry Him Again...Wives Salute Their African American Husbands. www.yesiwouldmarryhimagain.com
    At every event atleast one woman will talk about the pain of not having her father in her life. What's puzzles me the most is that father's who wanted to be in their daughter's lives but were denied the opportunity when things didn't workout between the mother and father..often times the daughter was used by the mother and kept away from the father. Unfortunately, the daughter is told by the mother in some cases that her father didn't want to be apart of her life and only sometimes provided financial support. Let's stop the divorcing of our children from parents when the marriage or relationship fails between the adults. Our children need both parents in their lives.
    Congratulations for creating a much needed conversation.

  • CareyCarey | August 23, 2011 9:04 AMReply

    Vanessa, thanks for posting this, my hat is tip in your direction.

    I was so moved by this documentary b/c of my own “absence” of a different color. Maybe I should explain...

    I’ve found a need to tell on myself. There’s serendipitous rewards on the other side.

    I've always thought being a man was about being tuff & and strong. I put a great deal of emphasis on providing for my family and protecting them. Looking back,the hardest thing for me to do on a continual basis was share my emotions. I gave my family most things I thought would be key for their survival. Yet I sometimes wonder if I gave them all the tools necessary to endure the long haul. I now look back and wonder if I gave them all of me, and what examples did I project. I could blame everybody and everything. I could open the door to excuses. Yet, I've come to believe that would be closing the door on growth.

    I've never had a defined purpose for blogging. Maybe - just maybe my purpose is being defined for me through my sharing and your thoughtful comments. So let me continue.

    How does one prepare for the departure of their only daughter. In many ways my daughter was a bond that kept my family together. She was an integral part of my family unit. She was not planned. Her mother and I were kids playing house and she became pregnant while we were in high school. We married and struggled as young parents. We shared dreams and spent many days and nights preparing our daughter for the day I will never forget.

    Being a young father, I was just like the birds and the four legged animals that found safety in trees to hide from harm. I could change my spots to look like a man and talk like a man but I wasn't a full grown man. I seldom reached inside to find the soul of a man. I had always mimicked my father, he was a great influence on my life. I watched his moves but I never saw his tears. When I became a boy with a child I was scared and insecure... I masked my fears and shoved emotions behind. And I used drugs to mask my pains and hide my emotions. I thought it wasn't manly to show fear... I found it hard to admit that I didn't know how to handle certain things. I was about to leave my daughter on the steps of a large University, with strangers.

    My daughter had never seen me cry. my wife had never seen me cry. .In truth, after leaving my parents home ... I had never cried. I thought back to the day my father told me to leave his home and go raise my family. I remember his pain .....I now was sharing those same emotions. I wondered if I was making the right decision or was I living through my daughter by suggesting she go to a large University far away from home, when she could have gone to a local college with similar benefits. Did I think her chances of being an Olympic star were greater... living my dream?

    My wife and I were about to leave our daughter at her new home, The University of Kentucky. We were proud yet fearful. I was her track coach. I had accompanied her on most of her trips. My wife would always be by my side... assisting as mothers do. She even ran along during training... we used her as a rabbit. My daughter would spot her yardage and try to beat her to the line. My son was along ....he was just joyful of the promise of a Happy Meal. My daughter was a high school and national age group champion... she now was going to Kentucky... A College National Champion.

    In many ways my wife and I didn't plan for this day. Sure, we planned for our daughters new day but not our lives together, without our little girl. The days were gone when we would nudge one another to see who would change her diaper or pick her up from practice. There would be no more loading of the car .....the four of use for family trips to wonderful cities. What would my wife and I do when we didn't have our daughter around? Someone we felt we had to stand guard over. Was this like retirement? Was I retiring from being daddy and she daddy's little girl?

    I couldn't fake this one... I couldn't change my spot from a sad, insecure and fearful father to one that appeared as if he had it all together... this was real. Emotions flooded me.. I looked at my wife for answers... her eyes and posture told me that she too had visited a dark place. Emotions I seldom dealt with, invade my soul... rationalization and ambiguous thought were no match for the pains and discomfort I was feeling.

    I was the leader of the family. As we got closer to the moment of goodbyes, I again looked in the eyes of my wife and with some reserve and trepidation I looked into the eyes of my daughter ....they both were looking for answers from their leader. That was a defining moment in my life. At that moment I think I became closer to being a real man,I lost it, I cried,I couldn't talk, I cried. I showed my vulnerability. I didn't have all the answer and I didn't know anything else to do - but cry.


    http://careycarey-carrymehome.blogspot.com/

  • Laura | August 23, 2011 7:37 AMReply

    Yes folks, that's what it looks like. And the young girls hide it by being tough. Moreover the come to believe no one will be there to protect them, physically, psychologically, and spiritually.

    Looking forward to seeing it. Want to know one of the reasons why young Black women make rotten choices in relationships. Straight up Daddy-hunger.

  • De | August 23, 2011 7:28 AMReply

    Just watching the trailer hurts...I know the feeling and this documentary is SO NECESSARY. I'm def going to support, give and spread the word on it. Well done.

Follow Shadow and Act

Email Updates

Most "Liked"

  • Taraji P. Henson Drama 'From The Rough' ...
  • Electro (Jamie Foxx) Faces Off Against ...
  • Watch Omar Sy In Action As Bishop In ...
  • Black Movie Trivia - Congrats to our ...
  • Interview: Chatting with RZA About Paul ...
  • Sidney Poitier Made Oscar History Today ...
  • Critically-Acclaimed Doc 'The Trials ...
  • Weekend B.O. April 11-13 (Close, But ...
  • GLAAD Awards Honors Jennifer Lopez-Produced ...
  • A Look At Seattle International Film ...