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10 Most Clever Bank Robberies in Movies

By Spout | Spout August 10, 2011 at 5:03AM

by Christopher Campbell This list was originally published on July 1, 2009. It is being reposted ahead of the opening of the bank robbery comedy "30 Minutes or Less."
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4. Lola Keeps it in the Family, in "Run Lola Run" (1998)


When she is desperate to get her hands on 100,000 Deutche Mark to pay a ransom, Lola’s (Franka Potente) options are depicted in three different scenarios. In the second of these segments, she decides to rob the bank where her father works. It’s a bold plan, but in a way it’s pretty clever because nobody would expect a banker’s daughter to be a bank robber. Of course, in the long run (no pun intended) such a crime wouldn’t really work, because she’s so easily identifiable, but in the short run it’s perfect, and hilarious, how the cops outside the bank don’t believe a young woman with bright red hair is the one robbing the bank.


3. Thomas Jane Investigates His Own Crime, in "Stander" (2003)


This film gets special props for being a true story, because it’s not often enough that real-life criminals are more clever than movie criminals. Thomas Jane plays a South African police Captain (named Stander), who starts robbing banks when he grows tired of his normal life. In the movie he often looks ridiculous, wearing disguises that seem straight out of the Beastie Boys’ “Sabotage” video. But his heists work out due to how unbelievable they are. Because he’s a cop, nobody suspects Stander for a long time, even when he’s recognized by a teller while leading an investigation of a robbery that he himself committed (this same irony occurred in the search for the informant “Deep Throat,” too).


This article is related to: Remakes, Full Films





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