Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Women to Watch: Anna Różalska of Match&Spark Management Women to Watch: Anna Różalska of Match&Spark Management Women to Watch: Actress and Filmmaker Ahd Kamel Women to Watch: Actress and Filmmaker Ahd Kamel Exclusive: Alfonso Cuarón & Alejandro G. Iñárritu Endorse Emiliano Rocha Minter's 'We Are The Flesh' Exclusive: Alfonso Cuarón & Alejandro G. Iñárritu Endorse Emiliano Rocha Minter's 'We Are The Flesh' Sundance Review: Moving Doc 'We Are X' Chronicles the Tragic Story of Japan's Biggest & Boldest Band Sundance Review: Moving Doc 'We Are X' Chronicles the Tragic Story of Japan's Biggest & Boldest Band Sundance ’16: Lebanese Comedy ‘Halal Love (and Sex)’ is a Hilarious Discovery from Razor Film Sundance ’16: Lebanese Comedy ‘Halal Love (and Sex)’ is a Hilarious Discovery from Razor Film Sundance Review: Why Culturally Sensitive Road Trip Dramedy 'Mr. Pig' is Diego Luna's Best Film Yet Sundance Review: Why Culturally Sensitive Road Trip Dramedy 'Mr. Pig' is Diego Luna's Best Film Yet Sundance Institute Announces New Merata Mita Fellowship for Indigenous Artists and 2016 Recipient Sundance Institute Announces New Merata Mita Fellowship for Indigenous Artists and 2016 Recipient Sundance Review: The Daniels' Heartfelt 'Swiss Army Man' is a Zany Existentialist Buddy Comedy Sundance Review: The Daniels' Heartfelt 'Swiss Army Man' is a Zany Existentialist Buddy Comedy How GKIDS Shook the Oscar Animated Race with First Latin American Nominee and a New Ghibli Hit How GKIDS Shook the Oscar Animated Race with First Latin American Nominee and a New Ghibli Hit Kosovo Gets First Oscar Nomination with Short Film 'Shok' Kosovo Gets First Oscar Nomination with Short Film 'Shok' 'The Boy and the Beast' Dir. Mamoru Hosoda on Shared Fatherhood & Why His Films Deal with Two Worlds 'The Boy and the Beast' Dir. Mamoru Hosoda on Shared Fatherhood & Why His Films Deal with Two Worlds 7 Latin American and Latino-Themed Films Vying for an Oscar Nomination 7 Latin American and Latino-Themed Films Vying for an Oscar Nomination Charlie Kaufman on the Meaning Behind 'Anomalisa' at PSIFF: 'See the film' Charlie Kaufman on the Meaning Behind 'Anomalisa' at PSIFF: 'See the film' 'Ixcanul' Director Jayro Bustamante on the Strength of Mayan Women & Guatemala's Indigenous Majority 'Ixcanul' Director Jayro Bustamante on the Strength of Mayan Women & Guatemala's Indigenous Majority Review: Why Alê Abreu's Sublime 'Boy and the World' is the Best Animated Film of the Year                                                Review: Why Alê Abreu's Sublime 'Boy and the World' is the Best Animated Film of the Year Romania 's 'The Chosen One' Marks the Beginning of the 2015 Golden Globes® Campaigns Romania 's 'The Chosen One' Marks the Beginning of the 2015 Golden Globes® Campaigns LatinoBuzz: Actress Kate del Castillo on Premios Platino and Working in Her Native Language LatinoBuzz: Actress Kate del Castillo on Premios Platino and Working in Her Native Language 30 Essential Iranian Films to Watch in Honor of Nowruz (Persian New Year)! 30 Essential Iranian Films to Watch in Honor of Nowruz (Persian New Year)! LatinoBuzz: Interview with Elvis Nolasco from ABC's 'American Crime' LatinoBuzz: Interview with Elvis Nolasco from ABC's 'American Crime' Oscars 2015 : Best Foreign Language Film Contenders - Europe Part 1 Oscars 2015 : Best Foreign Language Film Contenders - Europe Part 1

LatinoBuzz: Fernando Eimbcke on Filmmaking: "I Don't Want to Think Too Much About Style"

Photo of Vanessa Erazo By Vanessa Erazo | SydneysBuzz October 9, 2013 at 8:30AM

At the screening of his newest film, Club Sandwich, when asked about his aesthetic choices Mexican filmmaker, Fernando Eimbcke, rejected the notion that his films have a particular look. “It’s not a style. I don’t want to think too much about style.” His preference is to focus on the actors’ performances and the story. But even a lack of style, is a style. It’s a deliberate choice.
0
Dir.Fernando Eimbcke
Dir.Fernando Eimbcke

At the screening of his newest film, Club Sandwich, when asked about his aesthetic choices Mexican filmmaker, Fernando Eimbcke, rejected the notion that his films have a particular look. “It’s not a style. I don’t want to think too much about style.” His preference is to focus on the actors’ performances and the story. But even a lack of style, is a style. It’s a deliberate choice.

Eimbcke’s filmmaking is distinct; the camera stays still to capture intimate moments and conversations. His quiet, dialogue-driven films were selected to be part of the Emerging Artists sidebar at the Lincoln Center’s illustrious film event of the year, the New York Film Festival. The spotlight on directors in the beginning of their career is intended to showcase their entire body of work. For Eimbcke this includes screenings of his award-winning opera prima, Temporada de Patos (Duck Season), his second film Lake Tahoe, and his most recent project Club Sandwich.

The delicately balanced tone of Club Sandwich relies on a simple premise. Hector, a boy on the verge of manhood, is on vacation with his mother. She is young, has an eyebrow ring, and at first seems more like an older sister than his mom. They spend their days in lounge chairs sunbathing by the hotel pool, listening to their iPods. Hector’s mom, Paloma, is listening to Prince. “Why do you like Prince?” he asks her. “Because he’s a great musician and he is sexy,” she replies. “Am I sexy?” he asks. She responds just like a mom should, “Yes. You are. You are sexy in your own way.”

Fernando Eimbcke's 'Club Sandwich'
Fernando Eimbcke's 'Club Sandwich'

Hector’s budding sexuality and impending puberty come up against one obstacle. He has never met his father and his mother is his best friend. He has to learn how to be a man on his own. When he notices that he starts to smell bad, he has no choice but to use his mom’s flowery-scented deodorant. When he shaves his faint mustache for the first time he uses his mom’s pink disposable razor. Small moments like the pink razor gliding over his face elicit laughter from the audience. There are no jokes but there are laughs. They come from long awkward silences and short awkward conversations.

Teenaged Jazmin is staying at the hotel with her parents. She and Hector quickly become friends. Hector is slowly pulling away from his mom. The crux of the film is in this painful moment when Paloma must learn to let go, to let her little boy grow up. Emotions are understated, communicated mostly in glances and gestures. The interactions often banal, the hot, sticky weather a favorite topic of conversation. The faint buzzing of a powerful fan acts as the soundtrack. Paloma has confronted the inevitable, her son is becoming a man. But at night lying in bed with the lights out things remain the same. “I love you,” she tells him. He replies, “me too.”


This article is related to: Fernando Eimbcke , Duck Season , Club Sandwich , Lake Tahoe , New York Film Festival , Latino, LatinoBuzz, Mexico, International Film Festival, International Sales Agent, International Film Market, International Film Business, International

E-Mail Updates