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6 Tips on How to Finish Your Micro-Budget Film

  • By Ted Hope
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  • October 28, 2011 8:30 AM
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  • 3 Comments
We don't want to repeat each other's mistakes. We have to learn to admit what we've done wrong. And we have to share the lessons we've learned. We learn what to do better the next time, by fucking up famously the first time. Second films are rich terrain precisely for this reason. I would love to be in a room of filmmakers who just finished their second film just to harvest the sweet tidbits from the conversation. Fortunately, recent sophomore feature grad, Preston Miller, shares today some of the morsels of knowledge he gathered his second time out.

Collaboration 101: Working With Your Partner (In Life And On Set) -- Part 3 of 3

  • By Ted Hope
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  • October 8, 2011 12:52 PM
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  • 1 Comment
The last two days, Sophia Takal and Lawrence Michael Levine have been sharing how they have navigated both a personal and professional collaborative relationship. For me, my curiosity about their process was sparked when I watched Sophia's GREEN, a feature that moved, impressed, and scared me. I look forward to collaborating more fully with my wife on our movies (albeit only behind the camera), but watching Sophia's film, I knew I had a lot to still learn about the how to of the dual pursuit.I will be presenting GREEN in a little more than a week from now at my HopeForFilm screening series, and it is not a film you should miss. GREEN premiered at SxSW this year and deserves to travel far and wide. It has lodged itself into my memory. If you haven't been following Sophia & Lawrence's very revealing conversation this last three days, I suggest you travel back in time and start from Thursday's post and read it one sitting.

Collaboration 101: Working With Your Partner (In Life And On Set) -- Part 2 of 3

  • By Ted Hope
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  • October 7, 2011 12:30 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Yesterday, in an effort to determine whether "Can A Couple Truly Collaborate Creatively (And Survive?)" we started to look at the origins of the collaborative filmmaking team of Sophia Takal and Lawrence Michael Levine -- who just so happen to be entangled romantically too. Today, they share a bit about what they went through when they embarked on their first feature, Lawrence's GABI ON THE ROOF IN JULY. They are as honest and forthcoming about their process, as they are in their filmmaking itself. As I said yesterday, "Whether you aspire to work with your significant other, or just collaborate well with your team, the back and forth and growth that Sophia and Lawrence have committed themselves to, can all teach us a few things."

Can A Couple Truly Collaborate Creatively (And Survive?)

  • By Ted Hope
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  • October 6, 2011 12:30 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Jealousy is great fodder for creation. Our hunger for love puts stress on us even once we have found it, earned it, and secured it. Love is both incredibly deep and incredibly delicate. It is strong and it is fragile. We can make movies about love until the end of time, and not even scratch the surface.Indie & Truly Free Film are both currently awash in collaborative filmmaking teams. Some are siblings, some are friends, and at least one of them is a couple: Sophia Takal and Lawrence Michael Levine. When I saw Sophia's GREEN, I was incredibly impressed and moved. Not only does Takal tackle the subject of jealousy straight on, she does it by also starring in it with her boyfriend/fiance; just to complicate things, their roommate, plays his lover. I understand creative challenges, but know I have a lot to learn when the creative challenges the personal. I asked Sophia and Lawrence to tell us a bit about how their collaboration came to be. Whether you aspire to work with your significant other, or just collaborate well with your team, the back and forth and growth that Sophia and Lawrence have committed themselves to, can all teach us a few things.

25+ Things I Want To Know From New Filmmakers

  • By Ted Hope
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  • July 6, 2011 3:00 AM
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  • 8 Comments
When I moderate a panel, I get to ask some questions that aren't the kind I often get to ask in a regular meeting. The questions are as much, and maybe perhaps more so, for the audience. Still though, I am generally trying to get at something: the how and why of creativity at this time in the world.I learned a lot from moderating the "New Faces Of Indie Film" panel at Lincoln Center on Saturday June 11, 2011. Yes, in the future when I am involved on a panel I will insist upon diversity, and yes, I will set a limit to the number of people on the panel. But I also learned from the answers folks gave. I didn't get to ask all of them, but had I, I had the list prepared. These are those questions.

Guest Post: Martin Donovan "Gestation: A Case Study"

  • By Ted Hope
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  • June 28, 2011 3:00 AM
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  • 3 Comments
I set a lot of goals for myself that I can't reach. I feel I have a really good understanding of many of the steps that one must take to transform good work into something better. I long lists on what can be done to help a film from being overlooked. But I am human. I can't do all I want. I come from modest means. I have bills to pay. I have made commitments and honor my responsibilities and relationships. On any movie, there's a great deal that I want to do that will never get done. It doesn't stop me from trying to inspire others to do more though.

Your Second Chance: New Faces Of NYC Indie Film Video

  • By Ted Hope
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  • June 12, 2011 1:00 AM
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  • 31 Comments
We had a packed house at Lincoln Center for our "New Faces Of NYC Indie Film" panel. It was a good conversation. Sure, my game show idea did not work out, but hey, when you have eleven people up on the stage with you, it means you have eleven people not talking and that's hard to keep it lively. Luckily, all eleven people had a lot to say and are clearly a group of passionate and committed filmmakers, making sacrifices for the privilege of making their art. If you didn't get there, now through the miraculous power of the internet, you can give us two hours of your time and see what it is you missed.

Guest Post: Conor Horgan "What I Learned From Making My Movie"

  • By Ted Hope
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  • March 28, 2011 3:00 AM
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  • 2 Comments
One Hundred Morning screened at Slamdance 2010. It then won The Workbook Project's Discovery & Distribution Award. We hosted it at our Goldcrest Screening Series to great success. It is now having a NY run and the NY Times honored it with a Critics' Pick notice. When we screened it I noted: "End of the world scenarios come in all forms, but rarely are they dressed in such human(ist) clothing. Big concepts too often forget that it is all about life and how we live it. One Hundred Mornings keeps the characters (and all their foibles) front and center in the most relatable of manners. As much as we need each other, we are still only human. Society may have broken down but the every day stuff of love, jealousy, betrayal, and jerky neighbors is still what it takes to get through the day." I dig the film and love the use of genre to get to deeper subjects.
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