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Hope for Film

Guest Post: Jennifer Fox "PART 3: How MY REINCARNATION Broke All Kickstarter Records"

  • By Ted Hope
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  • June 23, 2011 3:00 AM
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  • 2 Comments
Yesterday, the profoundly generous Jennifer Fox shared with us four more of the lessons she learned crowdfunding. This after a run two week's earlier where she shared a host of other (1st six here, next 14 here, next 9 here).

Guest Post: Jennifer Fox “PART 2: How MY REINCARNATION Broke All Kickstarter Records"

  • By Ted Hope
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  • June 22, 2011 3:00 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Two weeks ago Jennifer Fox shared with us some of the lessons she learned crowdfunding (1st six here, next 14 here, next 9 here).

Guest Post: Jennifer Fox "How MY REINCARNATION Broke All Kickstarter Records & Raised $150,000"

  • By Ted Hope
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  • June 8, 2011 3:00 AM
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  • 4 Comments
Two weeks ago Jennifer Fox shared with us some of the lessons she learned crowdfunding (1st six here, next 14 here) . Since then, she has gone down in the record books for both the number of donations and the amount thereof. If they gave records for quality as well as quantity she probably would have gotten those too.

The Next Step Towards Your Personalized Pleasure Planet

  • By Ted Hope
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  • June 6, 2011 10:48 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Suggestion engines tell you what might appeal to you: i.e. you loved "REPULSION" and "CACHE", so you will also like "MARTHA MARCEY MAY MARLENE". But if you are at all like me, you've already found enough movies to get you well past your life expectancy rate. It's now more you crave, but less!

Guest Post: Felicia Ptolemy "Tool Review: Transcendent Man on The Dynamo Player"

  • By Ted Hope
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  • May 26, 2011 3:00 AM
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  • 5 Comments
A while back we had Dynamo Player's founder Rob Millis introduce us to this useful tool for DIY Distribution. But how do the filmmakers using it, feel about the Dynamo Player? Today, Felicia Ptolemy, one of the producers behind one very successful film, Transcendent Man, shares their thoughts on the Dynamo Player.

itzon – a new film platform. It’s film, but different.

  • By Ted Hope
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  • May 23, 2011 12:30 PM
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  • 0 Comments
I got a press release last week announcing a new platform for indie film that I thought you all would like to know about, and it's FREE. The press release is below. Let me know what you think about this new platform for indie film.

Guest Post by Jennifer Fox: "Change Or Die: How 22 Years On One Film Lead To Desperate Measures

  • By Ted Hope
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  • May 20, 2011 3:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
I have been producing for about 25 years now. I have routines, methods, and even rituals that help me get done what I have to get done. But if there is one thing that is constant in the film/media biz it is change. If we don't remain eternal students, we don't evolve and grow. Both our art and our business requires that we sometimes abandon all we have learned and take new approaches. We have to learn new tricks and embrace them with the love of a true amateur.

Guest Post by Ross Howden: "How Do You Sell A Film That's Being Given Away?"

  • By Ted Hope
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  • May 18, 2011 3:00 AM
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  • 4 Comments
The most important thing for filmmakers is to have an audience. Survival (aka Economic Returns) probably falls next on the list. Using the available tools to distribute and aggregate, are these two pursuits compatible?

Guest Post by Jon Fougner: Cinema Profitability Part 3

  • By Ted Hope
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  • May 13, 2011 3:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments
This is Part 3 of Jon Fougner's guest series on Cinema Profitablility - today he focuses on the channels:

Guest Post: Rob Mills "Online Distribution: 10 Lessons from Dynamo Player"

  • By Ted Hope
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  • April 28, 2011 5:30 AM
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  • 8 Comments
It used to be that indie filmmakers generally made their films for an audience/market of 6-10; those days their audience was the buyers at the film festivals. Those days made life simple: filmmakers had two responsibilities -- make your damn movie and then surrender. The idea then was that distributors would distribute the work we made. Several years ago folks started to realize that this model covered less than 1% of the films made in America (forget about the rest of the world).

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