The 2012 Best Picture Oscar Lineup in Terms of Race, Class, Gender and (Subjectively Speaking) Quality

Photo of Peter Knegt By Peter Knegt | The Lost Boys February 21, 2012 at 1:24PM

As a result of the hoopla that resulted from the LA Times' investigative report on Oscar voters are how insanely white and old and male they are (which though appalling is hardly surprising), I got to thinking about this year's best picture lineup. Yes, we all know how bad most of the movies are, but there perhaps hasn't been as much talk as there should be about another appalling aspect of Oscar, perhaps this year more than ever:
29
descendants

As a result of the hoopla that resulted from the LA Times' investigative report on Oscar voters are how insanely white and old and male they are (which though appalling is hardly surprising), I got to thinking about this year's best picture lineup. Yes, we all know how bad most of the movies are, but there perhaps hasn't been as much talk as there should be about another appalling aspect of Oscar, perhaps this year more than ever:

In terms of race, class and gender, the 2012 best picture lineup is astounding white, male and upper-class in a way it hasn't been in awhile.  Take out "The Help," and all we've got left for 2012's Oscars are films about a singular, white male and often filthy rich characters on some sort of journey of privileged self-discovery.

Is this the fault of the new system -- in which #1 votes make or break your presence on the best picture lineup, thus exposing the very old, white male voters preference for films featuring their cinematic counterparts? Possibly. Or is it just a typically bad year for representation ? Well, not really. There were loads of great films made by and about people that aren't rich old white dudes.

Whatever the reason, it's not some drastically new phenomenon. Many other years have featured similar makeups, it just seems like this year is collectively just a little bit worse. This is especially since there's 9 films in there. Both of the years that there were 10 films nominated saw a drastically more inclusive and diverse lineup of films.

As noted, there's also the issue that almost all the movies nominated suck. Personally I would only recommend 3 or 4 of the 9 films, and the critical consensus is definitely not too far off from that. 

Here's my brief take on each of them, as well as a look at how white, rich and male they -- and the people behind them -- are. Will do the same for last year tomorrow, which should make clear what a step backwards this year's Oscars are indeed.

The Artist:
Directed by: White male
Written by: White male
Lead character: White male
Class of lead character: Upper
Purpose of most prominent secondary female character: Love interest
Is it at least any good? It's a technical and artistic achievement to be sure, with some ridiculously charming performances. But it's definitely too slight (and frankly, boring) to be a the best picture winner it's about to become.
Reductive letter grade: B+

The Descendants:
Directed by: White male
Written by: White males
Lead character: White male
Class of lead character: Upper
Purpose of most prominent secondary female character: Daughter
Is it at least any good? I find it difficult to understand why so many folks would say yes. Most certainly Alexander Payne's worst film, this ode to rich-people-problems lacks the sincerity or humor that drew me to most of his other films. Most overrated film of 2011.
Reductive letter grade: C+

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close:
Directed by: White male
Written by: White male
Lead character: White male
Class of lead character: Upper middle
Purpose of most prominent secondary female character: Mother
Is it at least any good? No. How it got so many #1 votes and got nominated in the first place is a mystery since it seems like nobody would disagree. Sure, it has a few nice moments but in general it's an overlong, manipulative schmaltzfest with a very irritating lead performance.
Reductive letter grade: C

The Help:
Directed by: White male
Written by: White male
Lead character: Arguably actually a white female (Emma Stone), though its enough of an ensemble not to go there. Let's go with mix of black and white females (which is as good as its gonna get here).
Class of lead character(s): Mix of middle class women and the working class women who work as their maids.
Is it at least any good? In a decent TV movie sort of way, maybe. Historical inaccuracies and representational issues aside (and that's a big 'aside'), it's definitely an entertaining, cookie-cutter movie saved in large part by one of the best ensemble performances of the year.
Reductive letter grade: B

Hugo:
Directed by: White male
Written by: White male
Lead character: White male
Class of lead character: Lower
Purpose of most prominent secondary female character: Best pal
Is it at least any good? While certainly admirable in its aesthetics and ambition to champion film restoration -- I also found it mostly tedious  and boring (save the final act). Many would disagree with me, but "Hugo" is a snore.
Reductive letter grade: B

Midnight in Paris:
Directed by: White male
Written by: White male
Lead character: White male
Class of lead character: Upper
Purpose of most prominent secondary female character: Shrill girlfriend
Is it at least any good?  As a general fan of Woody Allen, I'd take "Vicky Cristina Barcelona" or "Match Point" over this anyday. Enjoyable in moments, it collectively felt underpolished and slight. If it hadn't made so much fucking money, I doubt it would even be here.
Reductive letter grade: B-

Moneyball:
Directed by: White male
Written by: White males
Lead character: White male
Class of lead character: Upper middle
Purpose of most prominent secondary female character: Daughter
Is it at least any good? Yes. Exceeding typical sports-themed movies in intelligence, humor and heart, "Moneyball" is incredibly clever and affecting. Taking on the notion of change in a quietly profound way, its one of two worthy movies on this list -- both of which happen to star Brad Pitt.
Reductive letter grade: A-

The Tree of Life:
Directed by: White male
Written by: White male
Lead character: White male
Class of lead character: Middle
Purpose of most prominent secondary female character: Mother
Is it at least any good? Absolutely. Though divisive to be sure, even its critics are likely to admire the film's cinematic ambition. For me personally, I found it awe-inspiring in every possible way and reducing my thoughts to a paragraph is essentially impossible. Though I think it does boil down to how much you can feel what's going on, and that's clearly very subjective. It certainly helps if you were the eldest son in a middle class family with a overbearing father. But even if you weren't, surely the lyrical beauty of Malick's filmmaking got to many of you...
Reductive letter grade: A

War Horse:
Directed by: White male
Written by: White male
Lead character: White male
Class of lead character: Lower
Purpose of most prominent secondary female character: Mother
Is it at least any good? Nein. See here (I'm getting lazy).
Reductive letter grade: C

Check out a rundown of 2011's lineup here.

So now let's compare (and for the hell of it, I'll add in 2010's #s without doing the full analysis treatment)....

Directed by:
2010 (8 white males, 1 black male, 2 white females)
2011 (9 white males, 2 white females)
2012 (9 white males)

Written by:
2010 (13 white males,  1 black male, 1 white female)
2011 (15 white males, 3 white females)
2012 (16 white males)

Lead characters:
2010 (7 white males, 2 white females, 1 black female)
2011 (7 white males, 5 white females)
2012 (8 white males, 1 white female*, 1 black female*)

Classes of lead characters:
2010 (2 upper middle, 6 middle, 1 lower middle, 1 lower)
2011 (2 upper, 1 upper middle, 2 middle, 2 lower middle, 1 lower) 
2012 (4 upper, 1 upper middle, 2 middle, 3 lower**)

Are they at least any good?:
2010 (5 yes, 3 mixed, 2 no)
2011 (6 yes, 4 mixed)
2012 (3 yes, 2 mixed, 4 no)

*-Suggests the arguable idea that Emma Stone and Viola Davis were co-leads of "The Help"
**-Suggests the arguable idea that the kid from "Hugo" is lower even though it seems in the end he's destined to return the the middle class he originally came from.

This article is related to: Peter Knegt, Academy Awards