'The King's Speech' Wins The 2011 Best Picture Award; Film Takes 4 Oscars Including Best Director

by The Playlist
February 28, 2011 1:08 AM
6 Comments
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'Inception' Ties For 4 Awards, 'The Social Network' Wins 3 Prizes In Total



EARLIER: OK, we've got all of our quips, zingers and up-to-the-moment thoughts on the Oscars happening on our liveblog right here. But if you just want to take a quick glance at the latest winners, this is your place to be. We'll update it as it happens and you can check in later for further analysis and context on those who won, who surprised and who were overlooked. Alright, after a very MTV Movie Awards-inspired opening the 83rd Annual Academy Awards are on. Maybe not the most original opening, but hell, it worked.

POST-SHOW: In what turned out to be one of the odder Oscar evenings on record -- Kirk Douglas; that NYU kid who won the Best Live Action Short; Autotune singing of various 2010 movies and a rather sleepy and deadpan James Franco as host with an always chipper Anne Hathaway -- the 83rd Academy Awards (finally) came to a close, strangely on schedule. Or close enough anyhow -- basically only 10 minutes over, give or take a minute.

To the things you actually care about: despite surging midway through the show with several expected wins (including the always positive-auguring Best Editing), "The Social Network" could not best the late season momentum for "The King's Speech" which took the Best Picture Award. While around the 3/4 mark, "The Social Network" had won three awards next to the sole 'King's Speech' award for Best Original Screenplay, the tone of the evening changed around the 11:00 pm mark when Tom Hooper took the Best Director prize. Shortly thereafter, Colin Firth took the Best Actor prize and the film's Best Picture win was a fait accompli.


While Christopher Nolan was overlooked for a Best Director nomination, as was the film in the editing category, "Inception," actually came out as the evening's runner-up tying "The King's Speech" for four awards, including both sound awards -- mixing and editing -- Best Visual Effects and a surprise Best Cinematography award for Wally Pfister. The night started out with a few surprises, the aforementioned cinematography award, "Alice in Wonderland" winning Best Art Direction and Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross taking the Original Score prize for "The Social Network," plus a strange tone to the opening ceremonies that took at least 20 minutes to find its rhythm, but the predestined winners generally found their way to the awards that many had expected. If you paid attention to this Awards season, the chips pretty much landed where expected: Colin Firth taking Best Actor, Natalie Portman scoring her first Oscar for Best Actress, two acting awards for "The Fighter" (Melissa Leo and Christian Bale) and "Toy Story 3" winning best Animated Feature. While "The Social Network" obviously dominated the critical season, "The King's Speech" dominated the more important guild awards much later in the frame and that hegemony continued tonight. While some, including us, thought that David Fincher might take the Best Director prize, while "The King's Speech" would win the top award, it was not to be and the unsmiling filmmaker ended up empty-handed. The winners are below.

BEST PICTURE
WINNER: "The King’s Speech" (The Weinstein Company)

Black Swan (Fox Searchlight)
The Fighter (Paramount)
Inception (Warner Bros.)
The Kids Are All Right (Focus Features)
The King’s Speech (The Weinstein Company)
127 Hours (Fox Searchlight)
The Social Network (Sony Pictures Releasing)
Toy Story 3 (Walt Disney)
True Grit (Paramount)
Winter’s Bone (Roadside Attractions)

BEST ACTOR
WINNER: Colin Firth in "The King's Speech" (The Weinstein Company)

Javier Bardem in “Biutiful” (Roadside Attractions)
Jeff Bridges in “True Grit” (Paramount)
Jesse Eisenberg in “The Social Network” (Sony Pictures Releasing)
James Franco in “127 Hours” (Fox Searchlight)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
WINNER: Christian Bale in “The Fighter” (Paramount)

John Hawkes in “Winter’s Bone” (Roadside Attractions)
Jeremy Renner in “The Town” (Warner Bros.)
Mark Ruffalo in “The Kids Are All Right” (Focus Features)
Geoffrey Rush in “The King’s Speech” (The Weinstein Company)

BEST ACTRESS
WINNER: Natalie Portman in “Black Swan” (Fox Searchlight)

Annette Bening in “The Kids Are All Right” (Focus Features)
Nicole Kidman in “Rabbit Hole” (Lionsgate)
Jennifer Lawrence in “Winter’s Bone” (Roadside Attractions)
Michelle Williams in “Blue Valentine” (The Weinstein Company)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
WINNER: Melissa Leo in “The Fighter” (Paramount)

Amy Adams in “The Fighter” (Paramount)
Helena Bonham Carter in “The King’s Speech” (The Weinstein Company)
Hailee Steinfeld in “True Grit” (Paramount)
Jacki Weaver in “Animal Kingdom” (Sony Pictures Classics)

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
WINNER: "Toy Story 3" (Walt Disney) Lee Unkrich

How to Train Your Dragon (Paramount) Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois
The Illusionist (Sony Pictures Classics) Sylvain Chomet


ART DIRECTION
WINNER: "Alice in Wonderland" (Walt Disney), Robert Stromberg (Production Design), Karen O’Hara (Set Decoration)

The King’s Speech (Paramount), Eve Stewart (Production Design), Judy Farr (Set Decoration)
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 (Warner Bros.), Stuart Craig (Production Design), Stephenie McMillan (Set Decoration)
Inception (Warner Bros.), Guy Hendrix Dyas (Production Design), Larry Dias and Doug Mowat (Set Decoration)/span>
True Grit (Paramount), Jess Gonchor (Production Design), Nancy Haigh (Set Decoration)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
WINNER: "Inception" (Warner Bros.) Wally Pfister

Black Swan (Fox Searchlight) Matthew Libatique
The King’s Speech (The Weinstein Company) Danny Cohen
The Social Network (Sony Pictures Releasing) Jeff Cronenweth
True Grit (Paramount) Roger Deakins

COSTUME DESIGN
WINNER: "Alice in Wonderland "(Walt Disney) Colleen Atwood

I Am Love (Magnolia Pictures) Antonella Cannarozzi
The King’s Speech (The Weinstein Company) Jenny Beavan
The Tempest (Miramax) Sandy Powell
True Grit (Paramount) Mary Zophres

BEST DIRECTOR
WINNER: "The King’s Speech" (The Weinstein Company), Tom Hooper

Black Swan (Fox Searchlight), Darren Aronofsky
The Fighter (Paramount), David O. Russell
The Social Network (Sony Pictures Releasing), David Fincher
True Grit (Paramount), Joel Coen and Ethan Coen

BEST DOCUMENTARY
WINNER: "Inside Job "(Sony Pictures Classics)

Exit through the Gift Shop (Producers Distribution Agency)
Gasland, A Gasland Production
Restrepo (National Geographic Entertainment)
Waste Land Lucy Walker and Angus Aynsley (Arthouse Films)

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT
WINNER: "Strangers No More" Karen Goodman and Kirk Simon A Simon & Goodman Picture Company Production

Killing in the Name Nominees to be determined A Moxie Firecracker Films Production
Poster Girl Nominees to be determined A Portrayal Films Production
Sun Come Up Jennifer Redfearn and Tim Metzger A Sun Come Up Production
The Warriors of Qiugang Ruby Yang and Thomas Lennon A Thomas Lennon Films Production

BEST EDITING
WINNER: "The Social Network" (Sony Pictures Releasing) Angus Wall and Kirk Baxter

Black Swan (Fox Searchlight) Andrew Weisblum
The Fighter Paramount Pamela Martin
The King’s Speech (The Weinstein Company) Tariq Anwar
127 Hours (Fox Searchlight) Jon Harris

BEST FOREIGN FILM
WINNER: "In a Better World," Denmark

Biutiful, Mexico
Dogtooth, Greece
Incendies, Canada
Outside the Law (Hors-la-loi), Algeria

BEST MAKEUP
WINNER: "The Wolfman" (Universal) Rick Baker and Dave Elsey

Barney's Version (Sony Pictures Classics) Adrien Morot
The Way Back (Newmarket Films in association with Wrekin Hill Entertainment and Image Entertainment) Edouard F. Henriques, Gregory Funk and Yolanda Toussieng


BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
WINNER: "The Social Network" (Sony Pictures Releasing) Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross

How to Train Your Dragon (Paramount) John Powell
Inception (Warner Bros.) Hans Zimmer
127 Hours (Fox Searchlight) A.R. Rahman
The King’s Speech (The Weinstein Company) Alexandre Desplat

BEST ORIGINAL SONG
WINNER: “We Belong Together” from "Toy Story 3" (Walt Disney) Music and Lyric by Randy Newman

“Coming Home” from Country Strong (Sony Pictures Releasing (Screen Gems)) Music and Lyric by Tom Douglas, Troy Verges and Hillary Lindsey
“I See the Light” from Tangled (Walt Disney) Music by Alan Menken Lyric by Glenn Slater
“If I Rise” from 127 Hours (Fox Searchlight) Music by A.R. Rahman Lyric by Dido and Rollo Armstrong

BEST ANIMATED SHORT FILM
WINNER: "The Lost Thing" (Nick Batzias for Madman Entertainment) A Passion Pictures Australia Production Shaun Tan and Andrew Ruhemann

Day & Night (Walt Disney) A Pixar Animation Studios Production Teddy Newton
The Gruffalo A Magic Light Pictures Production Jakob Schuh and Max Lang
Let’s Pollute A Geefwee Boedoe Production Geefwee Boedoe
Madagascar, carnet de voyage (Madagascar, a Journey Diary) A Sacrebleu Production Bastien Dubois

BEST LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM
WINNER: "God of Love" A Luke Matheny Production Luke Matheny

The Confession (National Film and Television School) A National Film and Television School Production Tanel Toom
The Crush (Network Ireland Television) A Purdy Pictures Production Michael Creagh
Na Wewe (Premium Films) A CUT! Production Ivan Goldschmidt
Wish 143 A Swing and Shift Films/Union Pictures Production Ian Barnes and Samantha Waite

BEST SOUND EDITING
WINNER: "Inception" (Warner Bros.) Richard King

Toy Story 3 (Walt Disney) Tom Myers and Michael Silvers
Tron: Legacy (Walt Disney) Gwendolyn Yates Whittle and Addison Teague
True Grit (Paramount) Skip Lievsay and Craig Berkey
Unstoppable (20th Century Fox) Mark P. Stoeckinger

BEST SOUND MIXING
WINNER: "Inception" (Warner Bros.) Lora Hirschberg, Gary A. Rizzo and Ed Novick

The King’s Speech (The Weinstein Company) Paul Hamblin, Martin Jensen and John Midgley
Salt (Sony Pictures Releasing) Jeffrey J. Haboush, Greg P. Russell, Scott Millan and William Sarokin
The Social Network (Sony Pictures Releasing) Ren Klyce, David Parker, Michael Semanick and Mark Weingarten
True Grit (Paramount) Skip Lievsay, Craig Berkey, Greg Orloff and Peter F. Kurland

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
WINNER: "Inception" (Warner Bros.) Paul Franklin, Chris Corbould, Andrew Lockley and Peter Bebb

Alice in Wonderland (Walt Disney) Ken Ralston, David Schaub, Carey Villegas and Sean Phillips
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 (Warner Bros.) Tim Burke, John Richardson, Christian Manz and Nicolas Aithadi
Hereafter (Warner Bros.) Michael Owens, Bryan Grill, Stephan Trojanski and Joe Farrell
Iron Man 2 (Paramount and Marvel Entertainment, Distributed by Paramount) Janek Sirrs, Ben Snow, Ged Wright and Daniel Sudick

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
WINNER: "The Social Network" (Sony Pictures Releasing), Screenplay by Aaron Sorkin

127 Hours (Fox Searchlight), Screenplay by Danny Boyle & Simon Beaufoy
Toy Story 3 (Walt Disney), Screenplay by Michael Arndt. Story by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton and Lee Unkrich
True Grit (Paramount), Written for the screen by Joel Coen & Ethan Coen
Winter’s Bone (Roadside Attractions), Adapted for the screen by Debra Granik & Anne Rosellini

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
WINNER: "The King’s Speech" (The Weinstein Company), Screenplay by David Seidler

Another Year (Sony Pictures Classics), Written by Mike Leigh
The Fighter (Paramount), Screenplay by Scott Silver and Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson. Story by Keith Dorrington & Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson
Inception (Warner Bros.), Written by Christopher Nolan
The Kids Are All Right (Focus Features), Written by Lisa Cholodenko & Stuart Blumberg

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6 Comments

  • Ryan | February 28, 2011 6:41 AMReply

    When i look at films I've been happy to see win in recent years (The Departed, No Country for Old Men) they share sensational elements that the Academy responds to: violence, nutso performances (in a good way). The Social Network--for all its comparisons to TV movies and court room procedurals--can be agreed upon here as far superior to The King's Speech, right? It had a sharp script, great performances and a real ambivalence to its characters' morality--the third element being is what killed it. These old sacks who vote for the Academy Awards want to know how they're supposed to feel--that was the whole campaign for The King's Speech ("Some films you see, others you feel.")

    It's one thing to argue that a film's job is to entertain--few films this year entertained me as The Social Network did. What disappoints me is that when a film requires us to think (but not even--just leaving open the possibility of Thought), it is derided as a film for critics and not audiences. I hope in the future, something can win Best Picture not for encouraging sympathy or sensationalizing anything from violence to speech therapy, but for evoking moviegoers and inspiring not emotion, but discourse about our society. A movie like that doesn't have to win every year--I love a good crowd-pleaser--but once would be nice.

  • Corsiva | February 28, 2011 5:57 AMReply

    Ladies and gentlemen, Trent Reznor is now an Academy Award winner. That was pretty fuckin ninja.

  • Christopher Bell | February 28, 2011 5:39 AMReply

    I was on a set with the director of "God of Love." Very cool, down to earth guy. Glad he won.

  • Abinas Jagernauth | February 28, 2011 4:50 AMReply

    Great reporting!

  • Michael Bay | February 28, 2011 4:37 AMReply

    fail

    king kong kin ka kin king kong you can see the KINGS SPEACH before ya hear it

  • Jackie | February 28, 2011 12:13 AMReply

    Ode to Oscar, old and new
    For 83 years you’ve made dreams come true!
    A gilded knight, crusaders sword,
    You compel the contest to unfold.
    On top of a reel of angled spokes
    You represent the many folk
    Who make us dream and laugh and cry
    And let our troubled worlds pass by.
    Now Colin, Natalie, and the rest,
    Have bared their souls and joined the best.
    How much this little statue means
    To everyone in the world – it seems!
    http://irishheart.com

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