The Playlist

SXSW '12 Review: 'Eden' Is A Gripping Sex Slavery Drama That Isn't As Dour As It Sounds

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • March 19, 2012 4:46 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Often the problem when making an "issue" movie, wherein you tackle some far-reaching social, systemic, or religious injustice, is that scope often becomes too burdensome, with the given topic often begging for thoughtful, intimate conversation and not the broad strokes that cinema offers. The best issue movies, things like Steven Soderbergh's multi-layered "Traffic," make the central concern seem both universal and incredibly personal, often setting aside crass moralization (the stuff "Crash" was mired in – hey, racism still exists, everybody!) for actual entertainment. "Eden," the Narrative Feature winner at South by Southwest, similarly tackles the issue of sex slavery, but it does so in a way that never feels too clumsy or overarching. Instead, it's a character study with thriller elements; it exposes you to a horrible underworld without ever beating you over the head with it.

Attention NYC: Win The Rialto DVD Box Set & Tickets To 15th Anniversary Screenings At Film Society Of Lincoln Center

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 19, 2012 4:23 PM
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  • 2 Comments
While New Yorkers have plenty of opportunity to see classic films on the big screen, you'll be hard pressed to find a lineup as front to back awesome as the Film Society Of Lincoln Center's "15 For 15: Celebrating Rialto Pictures."

Exclusive: Gary Oldman, Colin Firth & Tom Hardy Talk 'Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy' In 3 Clips From The BluRay

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 19, 2012 3:19 PM
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  • 4 Comments
While "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy" didn't bring home any Oscar gold in February, Tomas Alfredson's expertly calibrated spy thriller proved that the genre can deliver just as much thrills with dialogue, obversation and a deeply intelligent approach, than movies packed with gadgets, martinis, babes and tuxedos. The picture finally earned Gary Oldman his long overdue first Oscar nomination, and brought together an ensemble of Britain's finest acting talents the likes of which we may not ever see again.

Woody Allen's 'Nero Fiddled' Now Titled 'To Rome With Love'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 19, 2012 3:09 PM
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  • 7 Comments
First known as "Bop Decameron" before switching over to "Nero Fiddled" last fall, the latest effort from Woody Allen has now settled on its final title.

No One Is From The Future: New Trailer For Zal Batmanglij's 'Sound Of My Voice' Starring Brit Marling

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 19, 2012 2:40 PM
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  • 1 Comment
If last year we saw the paranoia and fear of someone leaving a cult in "Martha Marcy May Marlene," in 2012 we'll see those feelings explored from people entering that strange world in "Sound Of My Voice." The film, one of two starring Brit Marling that wowed Sundance audiences in January 2011 (the other being "Another Earth" which hit theaters last summer), is on the way to theaters and after showing off the first twelve minutes a few weeks ago, a standard trailer has arrived, adding another layer of intrigue to the picture.

Vengeful Gods, Slaves & Mere Mortals: Deconstructing The ‘Prometheus’ Trailer

  • By The Playlist
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  • March 19, 2012 2:06 PM
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  • 13 Comments
The trailer for Ridley Scott’s upcoming, much-anticipated sci-fi film, “Prometheus” has landed and pardon our French, but holy shit, it’s rather astounding. Christopher Nolan you’re officially on blast and you may need to raise your game for ‘TDKR’ trailer number two.

SXSW '12 Review: 'Citadel' Is A Sometimes Scary, Sometimes Silly Entry In the Hoodie Horror Sub-Genre

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • March 19, 2012 1:20 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Over the last few years an interesting subgenre has developed in British horror – dubbed "hoodie horror" by the press and named after the young, urban kids who wear hooded sweatshirts – these films were set primarily in England's low income housing "estates" and played up the fears of "Broken Britain," a term coined by conservative newspaper The Sun, to describe the country's perceived social and moral bankruptcy. Everything from the Michael Caine revenge thriller "Harry Brown" to last year's gleeful South by Southwest smash "Attack the Block" have used elements of this subgenre. "Citadel," which just won the Midnight award at South by Southwest, further explores the fears and anxieties of urban Britain (and Ireland), and the results are sometimes scary, sometimes silly, and always politically questionable.

10 Reasons Why '21 Jump Street' Exceeded Expectations

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • March 19, 2012 12:57 PM
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  • 8 Comments
On paper, "21 Jump Street" was not an enticing proposition. A reboot of a 1980s TV series with a ludicrous premise -- fresh-faced cops go undercover as high school students. Produced by Neal Moritz, a man whose last attempt at an action-comedy reboot of a famous property was the dreadful "The Green Hornet." Directed by two first-time live-action feature directors. Written by the man behind "Project X." And starring Jonah Hill, coming off a terrible R-rated comedy flop, in "The Sitter," and Channing Tatum, a man whose previous turns weren't so much performed as whittled out of wood. 

Halle Berry To Star In Brad Anderson's Call Center Thriller 'The Hive'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • March 19, 2012 12:22 PM
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  • 2 Comments
So has Halle Berry been struck with the Oscar curse, or just been making mostly bad choices? Ever since winning for "Monster's Ball" a decade ago, she did the franchise thing in "Die Another Day" and the 'X-Men' trilogy of films and between those, she lined up a string of stinkers including "Catwoman," "Gothika" and "Perfect Strangers." Her attempted return to Oscar a couple of years ago, "Frankie & Alice," barely got a release and while "Things We Lost In The Fire" was a brief return to something substantial, this spring she toplines the dreadful looking shark movie "Dark Tide." So a thriller that takes place in a call center? That's right up her alley these days it seems.

SXSW '12 Interview: 'The Raid' Director Gareth Evans Talks Sequel & Going Hollywood; Mike Shinoda & Joseph Trapanese Discuss Scoring The Film

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • March 19, 2012 12:04 PM
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  • 6 Comments
Few films at this year's SXSW Film Festival have knocked us back in our seat like Gareth Evans' assaultive "The Raid: Redemption." Opening later this month, it's a slickly realized, breathlessly paced actioner about an unlucky SWAT team that invades an apartment building that is more or less exclusively populated with very bad dudes. (A kind of warlord/drug kingpin resides in one of the top floors.) Appealing to the typical SXSW audience's love of extreme violence and foreign weirdness, the movie went over like gangbusters. We got to sit down and talk with the film's director, the very British Gareth Evans, about where the movie came from, what we can expect from the sequel, and being saddled with that goofy subtitle. And as an added bonus we also get to hear from the film's composers – Mike Shinoda (from Linkin Park) and Joseph Trapanese (the man chiefly responsible for wrangling Daft Punk's "TRON Legacy" score). Guest stars!

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