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The Playlist

Watch: First Full Trailer For 'Dredd' Reveals It's Basically A Futuristic Version Of 'The Raid'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 21, 2012 7:59 AM
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  • 9 Comments
In the future, drugs are still a problem, everything looks like "Blade Runner," and dudes in helmets with consta-growl voices are the only measure of justice. Welcome to the world of "Dredd," the remake of the "The Raid" you didn't know you wanted.

L.A. Film Fest Review: The Skillfully Shot ‘Thursday Till Sunday’ Is Slow To Make Its Arrival

  • By Emma Bernstein
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  • June 20, 2012 7:01 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Whether you are separating from your spouse or a child of parents who decide to split, divorce is a complex, sorrowful, bewildering event. It may leave questions unanswered, hearts broken, and individuals unfulfilled and without closure. Relationships are so layered that when it comes time to dissolve them, the process is anything but easy. And yet, it is at these most difficult times when the simplest words serve best. In her film, “Thursday till Sunday,” Chilean writer and director Dominga Sotomayor uses unfussy dialogue and a straightforward shooting style to translate the confusion and pain inherent in a couple’s withering marriage through the eyes of their quiet, precocious daughter.

L.A. Film Fest Review: 'Sister' Is A Beautifully Bleak Coming Of Age Story

  • By Emma Bernstein
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  • June 20, 2012 6:05 PM
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  • 1 Comment
A young child is dressing in a bathroom stall. We can’t tell what he looks like, as he layers on shapeless winter clothing and a neoprene mask hides all discernible features save for a pair of bright, knowing eyes. He goes through the pre-ski ritual, bundling up before braving the windy, snowy landscape of the mountain ahead. Except that this child isn’t dressing for a day of skiing, but rather a day of stealing. It isn’t until he lifts a backpack and a jacket, returning to the stall to sort through his loot, that his babyish face and soft, dirty blonde hair are revealed. This is the opening scene of “Sister,” the sophomore feature from Swiss director and co-writer Ursula Meier. The film, which won a Special Mention Silver Bear award at this year's Berlin Film Festival, examines the process of coming of age, and the challenges that face us as we arrive at adulthood.

'Safety Not Guaranteed' Writing/Directing Duo Derek Connolly & Colin Trevorrow Team For 'The Ambassador'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 20, 2012 5:23 PM
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  • 1 Comment
On paper, an indie comedy about someone who puts an ad in the classifieds, searching for a partner to go time traveling with seems pretty obvious and predictable. But writing and directing team Derek Connolly and Colin Trevorrow delivered something sharp, smart and surprising with "Safety Not Guaranteed." A low-key charmer that worms its way into your heart, the pair used the set up to explore (with a lot of laughs) the realities we construct for ourselves to make it through life, and what happens when they're broken. Anyway, it was a great feature debut for the filmmakers, and we're glad we don't have to wait long to hear what they're up to next.

Review: 'Kumaré' A Morally Questionable Docu-Comedy About Expensive Yoga Gurus

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • June 20, 2012 4:58 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Sick of spiritualists charging an arm and a leg just to spout incredibly vague musings designed to help you? Think they're all a bunch of scammers taking advantage of those who actually need real assistance? If so, you're in luck, because Vikram Gandhi is on your wavelength. This filmmaker has made a documentary not unlike "Borat" in which he pretends to be a native Indian guru (code name: Kumare), creating his own philosophy and gathering very dedicated followers. Unlike the Kazakh, the director will reveal himself to his peons at the end in an effort to prove that whatever change occurred was because of them and not him. Winner of the Audience Award and the 2011 SXSW Film Festival, "Kumare" is a tricky flick that makes a scary case on how easy it is to begin a cult, but it also (unsurprisingly) is a morally questionable film endeavor.
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Tim Roth To Star In David Cronenberg's Medical Drama 'The Knifeman'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 20, 2012 4:53 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Well, with "Eastern Promises 2" looking like his next feature film, David Cronenberg will take a quick break and move to the small screen first. He's already going to make a rare acting gig in the SyFy pilot "Rewind," and he's got his own TV show brewing in "The Knifeman" which has now found a lead star.

Rob Reiner Is Leonardo DiCaprio's Dad In Martin Scorsese's 'The Wolf Of Wall Street'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 20, 2012 4:22 PM
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  • 10 Comments
Well, if Martin Scorsese is looking to throw off any expectations people might have about his upcoming "The Wolf Of Street," he's doing a pretty good job. It's been a bit of an odd bunch assembled for the movie thus far, but apparently, we ain't seen nothing yet.

Review: Controversial & Upsetting 'Compliance' Is Still Affecting & Real

  • By Todd Gilchrist
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  • June 20, 2012 3:58 PM
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  • 2 Comments
If there’s a thin line between presenting unpleasant material to an audience and openly antagonizing them with it, there are going to be a lot of people accusing “Compliance” of the latter, when really what it’s doing is the former. Craig Zobel, the promising writer-director who made “Great World of Sound” in 2007, returns to the big screening with his deeply unsettling second feature, the fictional account of a real incident in which a caller impersonating a police officer contacted a fast food restaurant manager and enlisted her in enacting a sexual assault under the pretense of a criminal investigation. After immediately provoking intense feelings both positive and negative among audience members at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival, “Compliance” seems destined to become a lightning rod for controversy, but its success is so great in depicting the damage that can be done through complicity and inaction that the movie’s takeaway message may eventually be confused with the technique used in order to create it.

French Actress Jemima West Joins 'The Mortal Instruments'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 20, 2012 3:56 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Oh yeah, "The Mortal Instruments: City Of Bones," We nearly forgot about you. It seems this movie has been spinning its wheels, moving from on again to off again to on again over the past little while. But it seems some casting is now beginning to happen, and a new face is joining the film.

Lee Daniels' 'The Paperboy' Will Land On Theater Doorsteps On October 5th

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • June 20, 2012 3:34 PM
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  • 7 Comments
Critics were not kind to Lee Daniels' "The Paperboy" when it premiered at the Cannes Film Festival last month. Reviews were vicious, and we called it "a lurid, florid, humid, flaccid and insipid waste of time and money for the audience and for everyone who made it." While the starry cast  -- Matthew McConaughey, Zac Efron, John Cusack, Nicole Kidman, David Oyelowo and more -- combined with a retro story promised potential awards season material, that seemed to have been snuffed out by the film's reception on the Croisette. But don't tell that to Millenium Entertainment.

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