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The Playlist

Exclusive: New Images Of Gael Garcia Bernal In Pablo Larrain's Cannes Hit 'No'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 21, 2012 10:00 AM
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He's still relatively little-known in the U.S, but we've become huge fans of Chilean director Pablo Larrain over the last few years. The director first came on the scene with the excellent "Tony Manero," and followed it up a few years back with the equally good, but very different "Post Mortem." Neither received more than a perfunctory release in the States, but that may be about to change; Larrain's closing out his self-described trilogy looking at his birthplace under the rule of General Augusto Pinochet with "No," which premieres in Un Certain Regard at Cannes tonight, and stars international star Gael Garcia Bernal.

Fox Searchlight Hands John Hawkes Led Sundance Sensation 'The Surrogate' New Title & October 26th Release

  • By Simon Dang
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  • May 21, 2012 9:40 AM
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Park City has been birth place of several award-season runs in recent years with "Precious" in 2009, "Winter's Bone" in 2010 or "Martha Marcy May Marlene" last year all coming into the Oscar conversaton a year after their premieres. This year, the water was a little murkier with no definitive picture leaping out of the pack though, along Benh Zeitlin's "Beasts Of The Southern Wild" and Ben Lewin's drama "The Surrogate" starring Sundance favorite John Hawkes seem to be the most likely candidates.

Luc Besson Directing Robert De Niro In Gangster Thriller 'Malativa'

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • May 21, 2012 9:20 AM
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Man, Luc Besson really didn't take to retirement, did he? Besson recently turned to a stack of scripts he's written in a co-financing partnership between Besson's EuroCorp and Relativity Pictures, getting support for two new Besson-ian efforts.

Cannes Review: Abbas Kiarostami Drives In Circles In Dull 'Like Someone In Love'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 21, 2012 9:00 AM
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After heading to Italy for his last effort "Certified Copy," famed Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami had a very simple reason for making Japan the next stop on his international production jaunt. "...if I make a film in Japan, I won't be accused of making a film for the West. Making a film in Japan is like making a film in Iran. Whether actors speak Japanese or Persian, there are still subtitles." Unless he makes "Men In Black 4," it's hard to fathom that Kiarostami would ever be thought of as submitting to the conventions of American filmmaking. And no matter what language its in, "Like Someone In Love" is pure Kiarostami, but whether or not it succeeds is up for debate.

Tahar Rahim To Star Opposite Marion Cotillard In 'A Separation' Helmer Asghar Farhadi's Upcoming French-Language Effort

  • By Simon Dang
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  • May 21, 2012 8:40 AM
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  • 6 Comments
Merely days after "A Separation" helmer Asghar Farhadi cast fellow Oscar winner Marion Cotillard in his mysterious French-language feature, the Iranian has added another prestigious Gallic talent to the project in actor Tahar Rahim.

Nicole Kidman To Reunite With 'The Paperboy' Helmer Lee Daniels For 'The Butler'

  • By Simon Dang
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  • May 21, 2012 8:20 AM
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  • 2 Comments
With their teaming on "The Paperboy" set to unveil this Thursday at Cannes, it seems Lee Daniels and Nicole Kidman aren't sick of each other's company just yet, with the two lining up a reunion on the helmer's next project, "The Butler."

Recap: Episode Eight Of 'Game Of Thrones' Season 2 Is More Filler Than Killer, But Has Its Moments

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 21, 2012 8:00 AM
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  • 6 Comments
As was the case last season, episode eight of season two of "Game of Thrones," "The Prince of Winterfell" was all about the calm before the storm. A chance to catch the breath, and flesh out some of the characters before things kick off. Stannis Barratheon closes in on King's Landing, Theon Greyjoy clings to Winterfell as repercussions get nearer, Jon Snow is in the hands of the wildlings, Arya Stark is escaping from Casterley Rock, and Jamie Lannister is on his way to be exchanged for the Stark girls. That's the plan, anyway. Not a lot actually happened this time around -- this was one of the shuffle-the-pieces around episodes. Which is fine, but it did feel a little like filler in places.

Watch: Trailer For Sam Mendes' New James Bond Film 'Skyfall' Starring Daniel Craig

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • May 21, 2012 4:32 AM
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  • 13 Comments
The stakes have arguably never been higher for James Bond. 007 came roaring back in the form of Daniel Craig with "Casino Royale" in 2006, and the film was the most successful of the franchise to date, and one of the most acclaimed. But two years later, the rushed, messy, poorly directed "Quantum of Solace" arrived, and while it outgrossed its predecessor in the U.S, it fell short worldwide, and got poor reviews. Furthermore, the property was then thrown into turmoil by the bankruptcy of its parent studio, MGM. So in any year, a return for Bond would have a lot riding on it, but given that 2012 marks the 50th anniversary of the birth of the franchise with "Dr. No," success seems to be even more crucial.

Review: You Can't Go Home Again In Maybe The Best Episode Yet Of 'Girls'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 21, 2012 4:30 AM
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Over the last couple of episodes we've lamented that Lena Dunham's "Girls" has taken a turn towards the sitcom, with episodes that have favored wacky shenanigans over the humanity and heart -- and the humor that followed -- that opened the season on such a strong footing. Well, we're happy to report that "The Return" harkens back to those initial shows, and marks easily one of the best episodes this season so far. While we've been critical of the softball, superfluous subplots given to Jessa (Jemima Kirke) and Shoshanna (Zosia Mamet), it's a bit revealing that with the story centering strictly on Hannah (Dunham), it allows for some of the most focused and observant writing we've seen yet on the show.

Cannes Review: Chris O'Dowd Shines In The Otherwise Uneven 'The Sapphires'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • May 20, 2012 7:13 PM
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  • 3 Comments
Among the The Weinstein Company's pre-Cannes Film Festival buys this year was the largely unknown (until it was bought) Aussie musical/drama/comedy effort "The Sapphires." It's certainly easy to see why this easy-to-digest, feel-good movie earned their attention. With a slate this year that includes "Lawless," "Django Unchained," "The Master" and "Killing Them Softly" they could probably use something that's guaranteed to have broad appeal, and that's something the first-time feature film from director Wayne Blair carries in spades. And it's largely thanks to the winning charm of unlikely leading man Chris O'Dowd.

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