The Playlist

George Lucas Insists Greedo Always Shot First & Says 'Star Wars' Is "Not A Religious Event"

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • February 9, 2012 6:10 PM
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  • 18 Comments
It's kind of amazing that after putting fans through countless tweaks and changes, a dreadful prequel trilogy, and shoveling mountains of shitty merchandise their way, the "Star Wars" faithful have still supported the filmmaker and turned his sci-fi adventure into a $20 billion industry. George Lucas has always had disdain towards the very people that built up his mountain of wealth, and there's a reason why -- the fans have allowed him to. With every iteration of a "Star Wars" re-release, the faithful grumble and moan and make threats and then hand over their money anyway, so what reason does Lucas have to change anything he's doing? So it's no suprise that on the eve of the 3D re-release of 'The Phantom Menace,' Lucas has no problem shooting from the hip because he knows that come Sunday night, the movie will have made him a few more million dollars anyway.

Review: Greta Gerwig Is Unleashed, For Better And Worse, In 'The Dish & The Spoon'

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • February 9, 2012 5:05 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Whether you like it or not, we're going for a ride with Greta Gerwig. Opening with a perspective from the backseat, we see mostly the road ahead through the windshield, an endless dark tunnel with minimal traffic. A cellphone yelps for the driver's attention, to which the actress responds by tossing it out of the window -- obviously something is off, and at that point it becomes apparent (through a single, carefully framed shot in which we can see the unlit face in the rearview) that the woman is sobbing profusely. Rose (Gerwig) is not having a good day.

Watch: Jean Dujardin Auditions For Every Villain Role In Hollywood; Plus Bloopers & Making Of Doc For 'The Artist'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • February 9, 2012 4:58 PM
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  • 2 Comments
In case you haven't noticed, suave and remarkably handsome Jean Dujardin has arrived in Hollywood in a big way and all signs are pointing to him walking home with an Oscar at the end of the month, thanks to his charming turn in "The Artist." There are many rites of passage for actors looking to make an impression in the U.S., but one of them seems to be Funny Or Die. All kinds of talent have been using the video channel to show off comedic sides to their persona or simply let people know they can be in on a joke (see Sean Penn on "Between Two Ferns") or try and rehabilitate their image (Mel Gibson's tribute to Robert Downey Jr. with Jamie Foxx and Garry Shandling).

Scott Eastwood Joins Dad In 'Trouble With The Curve'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • February 9, 2012 4:39 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Clint Eastwood doesn't mind keeping it in the family. His son, Scott Eastwood, is following in his dad's footsteps, paying his dues with roles in the upcoming "Leatherface 3D" and "Of Men and Mavericks," but Clint has lent him a hand in his career giving him small roles in "Flags of Our Fathers," "Gran Torino" and "Invictus." And now, father and son are going to team up again.

Sean Durkin's 'Mary Last Seen' Short Screens For Free On February 20th In New York

  • By The Playlist
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  • February 9, 2012 4:00 PM
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  • 1 Comment
First time feature-length filmmaker Sean Durkin made a huge splash last year with his haunting Sundance debut “Martha Marcy May Marlene.” About a damaged woman who struggles to re-assimilate into her family after fleeing an abusive cult, the poignant drama instantly placed Durkin and lead actress Elizabeth Olsen on the map as ones to watch (and indeed, the Durkin-produced “Simon Killer” already made waves at Sundance 2012).

Susanne Bier To Direct Adaptation Of Best Seller 'Cutting For Stone'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • February 9, 2012 3:56 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Danish director Susanne Bier has never been shy about traveling the world for her films. Her Oscar-winning "In A Better World" split time between Denmark and an African refugee camp. Her upcoming comedy "All You Need Is Love" is set in Italy, while past efforts have seen her journey to the United States ("Things We Lost In The Fire") and (partially) to India ("After The Wedding"), and Bier has lined up another effort that will see her returning to Africa.

'Junebug' Director Phil Morrison Returns With 'Lucky Dog' Starring Paul Giamatti, Paul Rudd & Sally Hawkins

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • February 9, 2012 3:08 PM
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  • 3 Comments
It seems directors coming out of the wilderness is a trend that's going to continue in 2012. Last year saw new feature films from long-absent folks like Lynne Ramsay, Alexander Payne and Terrence Malick (who is suddenly on some kind of productive tear), while this year will see Whit Stillman's latest in decades, "Damsels In Distress," finally hit theaters. Well, another helmer we haven't heard from in ages is excitingly coming back.

Legendary Realizes A Big Budget Movie Based On 'Paradise Lost' Not A Great Idea; Pulls Plug

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • February 9, 2012 2:54 PM
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  • 4 Comments
The writing was on the wall for this one. Originally set to start a lengthy production in January in Australia, Alex Proyas' "Paradise Lost" was a massive endeavor, promising a 3D mo-cap take on the literary classic that would've required twenty weeks of pre-production, eight weeks of principal photography and seventy-two weeks of post-production. But as that start date loomed the studio got nervous, putting the film on hold, citing both budget and story issues. Perhaps feeling optimistic that they could get that $120 million budget whittled down, a summer start was still on the table, and the film's star, Bradley Cooper, said as recently as two weeks ago that the movie would be in front of cameras in June. But alas, it is not to be.

Superman Henry Cavill Will Climb 'The Great Wall' For Director Ed Zwick

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • February 9, 2012 2:24 PM
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  • 3 Comments
You see that face up there? Get used to it. With "Man Of Steel" hitting in just over a year, the marketing ramp-up/onslaught is just around the corner and Henry Cavill's face and name will soon become recognizable even to your Mom. And Legendary Entertainment, who are co-producers on the superhero pic, are eager to keep Cavill under their roof.

Review: Oscar Contender 'In Darkness' A Refreshing & Complex Tale Of Survival During The Holocaust

  • By Alison Willmore
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  • February 9, 2012 1:59 PM
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  • 0 Comments
In her director's statement for "In Darkness," one of this year's Oscar nominees for Best Foreign Language Film, Agnieszka Holland writes of representations of the Holocaust in literature and cinema that, "One may ask if everything has now been said on this subject. But in my opinion the main mystery hasn't yet been resolved, or even fully explored." The feeling she's facing may be less that everything that can be said has been said about the 20th century's greatest atrocity, and more that people feel like they've already heard it all. To read about the true story on which "In Darkness" is based is to have your mind skip ahead and (probably correctly) fill in many of the details: Leopold Socha, a sewer worker and thief in Nazi-occupied Lvov, hides a group of Jews in the tunnels after the ghetto is liquidated, first for money and later just out of a desire to keep them alive. They survive underground for 14 months as the war rages on above them, as Socha risks his safety and that of his family to keep bringing them supplies.

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