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The Playlist

Tribeca Review: 'Supporting Characters' Is A Middling Movie, But A Decent Would-Be Pilot Episode For A Show We Might Watch

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 26, 2012 8:05 PM
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  • 0 Comments
What fascinates about “Supporting Characters,” the new relationship comedy premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival, is that it’s greatest strength also registers as its most notable weakness. This decidedly Noo Yawk tale of an editing team in New York City and their satellite friends wouldn’t be at home as an extended pilot on IFC, with these two best friend leads getting into all sorts of middle-aged male troubles. It’s good, and bad, just like TV.

Tribeca Review: 'Graceland' Mashes Together Suspense Thriller With Sobering Child Trafficking Drama, With Mixed Results

  • By Gabe Toro
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  • April 26, 2012 7:35 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Mild-mannered husband and father Marlon Villar is just having one of those days. The boss is on his case. His wife is being needy. His daughter is acting up. The cops are bugging him. “Graceland” begins as a compendium of what some adults would call a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. Wah wah.

'Anchorman' Director Adam McKay To Helm 'Uptown Saturday Night' Remake With Will Smith & Denzel Washington

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 26, 2012 7:08 PM
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This is a project that has been in development so long we figured it was simply never going to happen. First picked up way back in 2002 by Warner Bros. as a starring vehicle for Will Smith, the project has been kicked around for over a decade and David Dobkin ("Wedding Crashers") was long attached to direct. A year ago, there was some fresh movement when "Role Models" scribe Timothy Dowling was brought on to give the script a fresh rewrite, with Denzel Washington now linked to the project. And it was only in March that the writer teased the remake of the 1974 would -- for better or worse -- be in the vein of "The Hangover" in the tone it was aiming for. Hmm...maybe it's going for "The Other Guys" instead?

Tribeca Review: 'Beyond The Hill' A Slow Burn Without The Burn

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • April 26, 2012 7:02 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Initially a proficient micro-budget character study with promises of suspense, "Beyond The Hill" squanders its tension by hitting repetitive notes and devolving into a heavy-handed parable. Emin Alper's little bag of tricks can't sustain an entire film and no amount of beautifully-photographed landscapes make up for the fact that movie is essentially a slow-burn without the burn.

The Duplass Brothers To Write Drug Tale 'Mule' For Todd Phillips To Direct

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 26, 2012 6:29 PM
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  • 2 Comments
With two mega-hit "The Hangover" movies under his belt, Todd Phillips is a man who has options. And if you remember, back in Feburary, it was reported that he was eyeing four different projects for his next directorial gig after "The Hangover Part III." Well, it looks like one of them is beginning to move forward.

Tribeca Review: 'Deadfall' Starring Eric Bana & Olivia Wilde Is Trapped In A Blizzard of Coincidence & Two-Dimensional Characters

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • April 26, 2012 6:17 PM
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  • 4 Comments
"Deadfall" starts off strong enough – three criminals, led by Addison (Eric Bana) and his sexy sister Liza (Olivia Wilde) speed away from some unspecified job (it's later revealed to be a casino heist). It's icy out and their driver (the only black character in the whole movie) overcompensates, avoiding a deer, which sends their car cart wheeling over a snowy embankment. As Addison and Liza climb out of the wrecked car they notice their very-dead driver, his head through the windshield. "He should have been wearing his safety belt," Bana grumbles, dripping a syrupy Southern accent on top of his natural Australian drawl. It's a perfect way to begin the movie – darkly comic, oddly thrilling, weirdly sexual (there's definitely an incestuous vibe between the siblings) – but these opening moments are probably the strongest in the movie's 94 minute running time.

Emile Hirsch Joins Toni Collette & Pierce Brosnan In Big Screen Version Of Nick Hornby's 'A Long Way Down'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 26, 2012 5:38 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Emile Hirsch certainly isn't predictable. The actor has vacillated from indie to movies to blockbusters to everything in between and you only have to look at recent batch of films -- "Killer Joe," "The Darkest Hour," "Savages" -- to realize that he moves very much to the beat of his own drum. So a movie based on a book by "High Fidelity" and "About A Boy" writer Nick Hornby? Why the hell not?

Review: Dim-Witted Edgar Allan Poe Thriller 'The Raven' Is Too Boring To Be A Guilty Pleasure

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 26, 2012 5:20 PM
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  • 3 Comments
About ten minutes into James McTeigue's "The Raven," a large, hairy man -- a writer and a critic, as it turns out -- is strapped to a table by a mysterious figure. A mighty blade, inspired by Edgar Allan Poe's "The Pit And The Pendulum," hangs forbodingly above him. And to his unseen captor, he screams "I'm just a critic! Why? Why would you do this to me?" After sitting through a further hundred minutes of McTeigue's inept, idiotic period thriller, we knew exactly how he felt.

Is Ang Lee's 'Life Of Pi' The Oscar-Contending, Blockbuster Surprise Of 2012? CinemaCon Wowed By Early Footage

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 26, 2012 5:02 PM
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  • 5 Comments
Let's just get this out of the way: making snap judgements about a movie based on ten minutes of footage is a bit ridiculous, but that said, first impressions mean a lot. It wasn't a fun week for Peter Jackson at CinemaCon who saw his 48 fps preview of "The Hobbit" heavily scrutinized, with many (including pushover fanboys) not finding favor with the hyper-realistic results of the new fancy schmanzy high-def footage. So today, Fox must've felt some butterflies when they decided to show footage from Ang Lee's big budget adaptation of "Life Of Pi," a movie that has been flying well under the radar so far. Well, not anymore.

Review: Restrained Werner Herzog Still Shines In Gripping 'Death Row' Series

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • April 26, 2012 5:01 PM
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  • 1 Comment
The prologue of each of the four episodes of “Death Row” is the same: a restless camera prowls through the dismal ante-room, holding cell and injection chamber of an unnamed execution facility, while director Werner Herzog tells us in his familiar teutonic monotone that, as a German and a guest of the United States, he “respectfully disagree[s]” with the death penalty, legal in 34 states, and performed regularly in 16.

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