The Playlist

Listen: 3 Pieces From Michael Giacchino's Score For 'John Carter'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 25, 2012 4:23 PM
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With Disney's years-in-the-making, reportedly $300 million, sci-fi specatacle "John Carter" hitting theaters in just over a month, it's likely we're going to be hearing and seeing lots more from the film soon. And while the jury is still out on whether the film will live up to the cult status of the Edgar Rice Burroughs source material or the money that has been spent on the project, at the very least, the reliable and always solid Oscar winner Michael Giacchino is scoring the film, so if that even if our eyes aren't pleased, our ears will be.

So Yong Kim Discusses Her Collaboration With Paul Dano & Battling The Freezing Winter In 'For Ellen'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • January 25, 2012 4:00 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Thanks to her previous films "In Between Days" and "Treeless Mountain," and a none-more-indie cast featuring Paul Dano and Jena Malone, So Yong Kim's latest "For Ellen" had to be one of the most anticipated films of Sundance, at least in certain circles.

Demi Moore Out, Chloë Sevigny In For 'Lovelace'; Javier Bardem Bails On 'Despicable Me 2'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 25, 2012 3:45 PM
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With all the buzz going on up in Park City, it's easy to forget that stuff is still happening in good ol' Hollywood, and the past day or so has brought some changes to some brewing films.

Sundance Review: 'Shadow Dancer' A Crackling Conspiracy Thriller

  • By John Lichman
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  • January 25, 2012 3:09 PM
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If “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy” represented the height of Cold War paranoia within the British intelligence community, then “Shadow Dancer” is the next chapter, replacing the ominous Russian government with a more localized threat: The Troubles in Northern Ireland.

Sundance: Mark Webber Talks Working With His Son On 'The End Of Love' & How The Michael Cera Scene Came Together

  • By John Lichman
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  • January 25, 2012 3:02 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Every artist takes inspiration from their personal life, but for Mark Webber, making his sophomore directorial effort, “The End of Love,” he didn't have leave home to find his muse. The film, which opened over the weekend at the Sundance Film Festival, focuses on a character named Mark and his two-year old son Issac; which is a coincidence since it stars Mark and his then-two-year-old son Issac. While not exactly a cinematic autobiography, like Webber's previous film, "Explicit Ills," which focused on the Philadelpha neighborhood he grew up, it allows the writer/director to approach a variety and thematic and narrative material with palpable sense of realism.

Sundance Review: The South Will Rise, But Not Like You Expected, In The Pagan, Powerful 'Beasts Of The Southern Wild'

  • By James Rocchi
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  • January 25, 2012 2:31 PM
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  • 4 Comments
Written and directed by Benh Zeitlin, whose short, "Glory at Sea," was shot through with purpose and promise, "Beasts of the Southern Wild" is as stirring and striking a film as you could wish for at Sundance. Shot and set in a Louisiana community called The Bathtub, on the wrong side of the levees that stop the water from encroaching on civilization, it's at heart the story of a little girl, Hushpuppy (Quvenzhané Wallis) who lives with her father Wink (Dwight Henry). That synopsis does not do the film justice, though, as the story -- based on a play by Lucy Alibar -- incorporates a flood that not only drowns The Bathtub but also huge, prehistoric beasts -- Aurochs -- returning to life from the frozen icecaps and stalking, gigantically, towards Hushpuppy's world. It's a flawed comparison -- and indeed, any comparison for a work as completely and startlingly unique as this will be flawed -- but I kept imagining "Beasts of the Southern Wild" as a pagan, powerful, Godless (but not loveless or hopeless) variation on "The Tree of Life," where parents and children cope with the passage of time and the end of life in a series of moments built as much on visual poetry as character interactions.

Sundance Review: '2 Days In New York' A Funny & Welcome Sequel Worthy Of Its Predecessor

  • By John Lichman
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  • January 25, 2012 2:18 PM
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  • 2 Comments
Taking place a few years after “Two Days in Paris,” with the events from that film summed up in a puppet show, Jack (played Adam Goldberg) is gone and Marion (Delpy) lives in New York with her boyfriend Mingus (Chris Rock), and their respective children from previous relationships. Both lead artistic New York lives as Marion is about to open a photo exhibit and Mingus is writing for the Village Voice along with hosting two radio shows. Marion's father Jeannot (Albert Delpy) and sister Rose (Alexia Landeau) are coming to New York to spend time as a family following the death of Marion's mother. The promise of foreign customs and crazy old men is fulfilled the second we meet Dad, locked in customs and removing the sausages he strapped to his chest.

Nick Cave Scoring 'West Of Memphis,' Laura Veirs Tunes Up 'Hello I Must Be Going' & More Sundance Sounds

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 25, 2012 1:24 PM
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  • 2 Comments
While Park City continues to buzz with celebs and films and the festival heads into its final weekend, let's take a moment take our eyes off the movies, and instead open up our ears. As it turns out, a good handful of the movies at the Sundance Film Festival are being powered by the music of some pretty impressive performers.

'The Hangover Part III' Moving Closer To A Summer Shoot, Memorial Day 2013 Release Being Eyed

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • January 25, 2012 1:05 PM
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  • 2 Comments
The Wolfpack is (almost) back. Following the over $580 million worldwide succes of the R-rated comedy sequel, Warner Bros. are very eager to get Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis and Ed Helms back for the third and final installment. And they are willnig to pay big bucks to make it happen.

Sundance: Mary Elizabeth Winstead On Playing An Alcoholic In 'Smashed' And Working With Roman Coppola & Charlie Sheen

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • January 25, 2012 1:04 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Every year, Sundance provides a massive career boost to a handful of people. Sometimes it's a total newcomer -- think of Carey Mulligan, or Elizabeth Olsen in recent years -- who suddenly find themselves on every casting wishlist around.

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