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The Playlist

Emile Hirsch Joins Toni Collette & Pierce Brosnan In Big Screen Version Of Nick Hornby's 'A Long Way Down'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 26, 2012 5:38 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Emile Hirsch certainly isn't predictable. The actor has vacillated from indie to movies to blockbusters to everything in between and you only have to look at recent batch of films -- "Killer Joe," "The Darkest Hour," "Savages" -- to realize that he moves very much to the beat of his own drum. So a movie based on a book by "High Fidelity" and "About A Boy" writer Nick Hornby? Why the hell not?

Review: Dim-Witted Edgar Allan Poe Thriller 'The Raven' Is Too Boring To Be A Guilty Pleasure

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 26, 2012 5:20 PM
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  • 3 Comments
About ten minutes into James McTeigue's "The Raven," a large, hairy man -- a writer and a critic, as it turns out -- is strapped to a table by a mysterious figure. A mighty blade, inspired by Edgar Allan Poe's "The Pit And The Pendulum," hangs forbodingly above him. And to his unseen captor, he screams "I'm just a critic! Why? Why would you do this to me?" After sitting through a further hundred minutes of McTeigue's inept, idiotic period thriller, we knew exactly how he felt.

Is Ang Lee's 'Life Of Pi' The Oscar-Contending, Blockbuster Surprise Of 2012? CinemaCon Wowed By Early Footage

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 26, 2012 5:02 PM
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  • 5 Comments
Let's just get this out of the way: making snap judgements about a movie based on ten minutes of footage is a bit ridiculous, but that said, first impressions mean a lot. It wasn't a fun week for Peter Jackson at CinemaCon who saw his 48 fps preview of "The Hobbit" heavily scrutinized, with many (including pushover fanboys) not finding favor with the hyper-realistic results of the new fancy schmanzy high-def footage. So today, Fox must've felt some butterflies when they decided to show footage from Ang Lee's big budget adaptation of "Life Of Pi," a movie that has been flying well under the radar so far. Well, not anymore.

Review: Restrained Werner Herzog Still Shines In Gripping 'Death Row' Series

  • By Jessica Kiang
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  • April 26, 2012 5:01 PM
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  • 1 Comment
The prologue of each of the four episodes of “Death Row” is the same: a restless camera prowls through the dismal ante-room, holding cell and injection chamber of an unnamed execution facility, while director Werner Herzog tells us in his familiar teutonic monotone that, as a German and a guest of the United States, he “respectfully disagree[s]” with the death penalty, legal in 34 states, and performed regularly in 16.

'The Place Beyond The Pines' With Ryan Gosling & Bradley Cooper Gets September 7th Release...In Spain

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 26, 2012 4:25 PM
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  • 9 Comments
One film that was a bit of a question mark before the Cannes Film Festival unveiled their slate last week was Derek Cianfrance's "The Place Beyond The Pines." The generational drama led by Ryan Gosling and Bradley Cooper was rumored to be one of the films announced, but as we know, that didn't quite happen. But it does seem the movie is near enough to the finish line that release dates are starting to appear....at least overseas.

Review: Nasty Nordic Thriller 'Headhunters' Doesn't Have The Courage Of Its Convictions

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • April 26, 2012 4:01 PM
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  • 2 Comments
For fans of the crime genre, both on the page and on the screen, Scandinavia has been the hottest source of new material in recent years (although obviously not literally). Steig Larsson's Millennium trilogy was a huge bestseller worldwide, and has already provided three Swedish films and David Fincher's upcoming remake "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo," while Kenneth Branagh has had great success on TV as Henning Mankell's "Wallander," and Danish series "The Killing" proved a huge hit at home and in the U.K, and was remade on AMC under the same name.

Tribeca: David Riker & Abbie Cornish Discuss Immigration Tale 'The Girl'

  • By John Lichman
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  • April 26, 2012 3:45 PM
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  • 1 Comment
Known for his neo-realist film about the plight of Latin American immigrants living in New York City, "La Ciudad," indie writer/director David Riker has spent the better part of 14 years evolving story of his latest feature, "The Girl" which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival last week. In the minimalist drama, Abbie Cornish plays Ashley, a minimum wage earner working in a podunk South Texas chain store, who is determined to get her son back; taken by child services after a drunken mistake. She finds out her wandering, absentee father (Will Patton) is on a self-proclaimed "lucky streak" which turns out to mean he's using his truck driving job to sneak Mexican immigrants into the country. When she tries her hand at it out of desperation, it goes terribly wrong --except she now has to deal with Rosa (Maritza Santiago Hernandez), a little girl that forces her to help find her mother and deal with her actions.

Watch: Blake Lively & Chloë Moretz Go White Trash In Red Band Trailer For 'Hick'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 26, 2012 3:43 PM
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  • 14 Comments
Well, we will say this. You ain't seen Blake Lively or Chloë Moretz -- or hell, most of the other cast really -- in anything like this before. Whether it all works or not is entirely a different matter, but the red band trailer for "Hick" is sure to grab your attention.

24th James Bond Film Now Slated For A 2014 Release, But Will Daniel Craig Return?

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • April 26, 2012 3:28 PM
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  • 3 Comments
It has been a long four years since we last had James Bond saving the world on the big screen. Throughout the history of the franchise, the producers have generally stuck to a new Bond film every two years, though there have been hiccups along the way (the longest gap was six years between "License To Kill" and "GoldenEye"). But it looks like with the motor back and running, Eon Productions aren't going to be wasting any more time.

Review: Richard Linklater's 'Bernie' Starring Jack Black Is A Harmless, But Charming & Funny Effort

  • By Edward Davis
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  • April 26, 2012 3:01 PM
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  • 0 Comments
Employing a laid-back, jovial and amiable mien, Richard Linklater's latest effort, the East Texas-set black comedy "Bernie," is not unlike the Austin-based filmmaker himself: affable, eager to please without pandering, and highly likeable. In fact, "Bernie," starring Jack Black as an endearing mortician and well-loved member of his small-town community in Carthage, Texas, is so delightful, and rather wryly comical, it’s easy to be charmed with the picture despite its modest ambitions, small-scale aims and slight nature.

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