The Playlist

Soundtrack for 'New Year's Eve' Features Jon Bon Jovi & A Bunch Of Terrible Music

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • November 23, 2011 10:40 AM
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  • 12 Comments
"New Year's Eve" is coming, and we don't mean the debaucherous, end-of-year booze fest. We're talking about the latest rom-com in the holiday-themed (shudder) franchise whose claim to fame is overstuffing the movie with celebrities whose screen time each amounts to about five minutes. As is befitting to such a half-hearted endeavor, the soundtrack is equally lame, featuring artists you've either never heard of and/or didn't realize people still listened to. Though your mom might like it.

Grateful Dead To Get The ‘Across The Universe’ Treatment

  • By Ryan Sartor
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  • November 23, 2011 10:22 AM
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  • 1 Comment
Before there was Phish, the Grateful Dead were the original jam band, for which people traveled the country, doing drugs and attending multiple-hour-long concerts every year, up until frontman Jerry Garcia’s death in 1995. Now an “Across the Universe”-style film is in the works, one that would feature re-recorded Dead songs in a film that “captures that psychedelic Haight-Ashbury hippie spirit of the late 60s and early 70s.”

Review: Cronenberg's 'A Dangerous Method' An Insightful Look At Sexuality & The Mind

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • November 23, 2011 10:01 AM
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  • 5 Comments
The recent career of David Cronenberg has been an interesting thing to watch. Having made his name with a very particular, icky brand of fetish-happy body horror, he hasn't dipped back into that well for a decade now, preferring instead to take his obsessions and use them to spice up what in other hands could be standard fare. And generally speaking, it has worked well: "Spider," "A History of Violence" and "Eastern Promises" all have much to recommend them, all peculiarly Cronenbergian, but each pushing in a slightly different direction. But now he's made what, on the surface at least, might seem to be his biggest departure to date: a period piece, based on a stage play (one of several in Venice this year--have movies rediscovered theater as a source of material?), that examines the relationship between the two major forefathers of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung.

New Pics For Angelina Jolie's 'In The Land Of Blood & Honey' & David Gordon Green's 'The Sitter'

  • By Ryan Sartor
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  • November 23, 2011 9:40 AM
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  • 0 Comments
One movie is gunning for Oscar, while the other wants to tickle your funny bone, and both have new images. See how we tenuously tied these two films together?!

The Small Screen: Chiwetel Ejiofor & Matthew Goode To Star In 1930s Jazz World Drama 'Dancing to the Edge'

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • November 23, 2011 9:20 AM
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  • 0 Comments
His name might be pretty much unfamiliar to all but the most fervent Anglophiles, but Stephen Poliakoff is something of a legend among British writers. He started his career as a playwright in the 1970s, before moving into television, which has hosted the bulk of his work, followed by feature films like "Hidden City" and "Close Your Eyes," with Alan Rickman and Clive Owen. Poliakoff's consistently idiosyncratic, often oblique dramas have become a brand in to themselves, making him one of the few writers who can continually bring in huge audiences for serious, adult television when it airs on the BBC.

Gary Oldman Won't Be The Colonel In 'Akira,' Ken Watanabe Next On List

  • By Oliver Lyttelton
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  • November 23, 2011 8:56 AM
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  • 5 Comments

New Images Debut From Ridley Scott's Mysterious 'Prometheus'; Patrick Wilson Will Only Appear In Flashback

  • By Drew Taylor
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  • November 22, 2011 9:12 PM
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  • 9 Comments
Few movies have sparked as much speculation, excitement, and unease (just think of the potential disappointment!) as Ridley Scott's upcoming "Prometheus," which promises to return the famed director to the "Alien" universe that shot him into the directorial stratosphere. What, exactly, "Prometheus" is remains something of a mystery, but these new images, set to appear in next week's Entertainment Weekly, sheds a little bit of light. At the very least, they just upped the intrigue factor, at least for us.

Watch: Club Beats & Destruction Get Mashed Up In International Trailer For 'The Darkest Hour'

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • November 22, 2011 6:20 PM
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  • 7 Comments
With all the high profile movies already jockeying for a position in the next six weeks or so, we have to admit, we sort of totally forgot about Summit's "The Darkest Hour." Maybe they have to? The film is about a month from release with nothing much in the way of promo, so this international trailer from Singapore, via /Film, will have to do for now.

Aaron Sorkin, Gary Oldman & Colin Firth Each Confirm They Are Thinking About Maybe Making Something

  • By Kevin Jagernauth
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  • November 22, 2011 5:45 PM
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  • 2 Comments
As if the "offer story" wasn't bad enough, the "testing" or "reading for" stories have taken that to a lower standard. And listen, we get it. We've run those things before because a peek behind the curtain is interesting, particularly for high profile projects and it's a window into what direction studios are looking to take a project. But confirming offer stories? That seems kind of ridiculously excessive, but it's also a slow news week, so here we are.

'Play' Director Ruben Ostlund Preps 'Tourist'; Will Contain "The Most Spectacular Avalanche In Film History"

  • By Christopher Bell
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  • November 22, 2011 5:37 PM
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  • 0 Comments
This year's New York Film Festival had plenty to offer for film buffs salivating over the spring season's wealth of buzz movies. From the silent-era love letter "The Artist" to the impressive psychodrama "Martha Marcy May Marlene" (not to mention established champions like "The Descendants," "Carnage," "The Turin Horse," "A Dangerous Method," and more), very few from the anticipated roster disappointed the east coast crowd. However, much like your average fest, these well-known titles stole the spotlight from smaller films not containing Marilyn Monroe or Michael Fassbender's member. It's understandable -- there's only so much time and skrilla -- but one movie worth catching up with is Ruben Östlund's "Play." Based on a true story about a group of wrong-side-of-the-track kids bullying and robbing three better-off children, the Swedish director's third feature is an uncomfortable and often-times bizarre film. The man's got a voice and perspective so unique that the movie only incites a hunger for more -- and thankfully, we won't have to wait long for another helping.

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